Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Nashville Japanese Film Festival Returns to Watkins Aug. 28-30 with 8-Film Lineup

Posted on: July 28th, 2015 by Caroline Davis No Comments

From horror to anime to documentaries, Japanese film is known for its inventive storylines and beautiful cinematography, and the second annual Nashville Japanese Film Festival (NJaFF), running August 28-30 at Watkins, will indeed showcase a wide range of Japanese storytelling. The eight offerings (all with English subtitles) range from a documentary on the legendary director Hayao Miyazaki to a historical drama about a “kitchen samurai.”

Nv-Japanese-Film-Festival-logo-sq-WwebFour of the films are being shown free of charge through the support of the Japan Foundation and the Consulate-General of Japan in Nashville. For the remaining, general admission is $10 per film and tickets are available online or at the door.

The mission of NJaFF is to celebrate all aspects of Japanese culture, as experienced through the medium of film and the expression of Japanese film makers. For tickets and further information, including opening night reception details, visit  NashvilleJapaneseFilmFestival.org.

NJaFF 2015  Schedule:
NJaFF kingdom of dreams WwebFriday, August 28
6:00 PM — Reception (ticketed reservations required)
7:30 PM — The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness  * $10
A documentary film which follows legendary filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki over a year as Studio Ghibli prepares two releases

Saturday, August 29
11:00 AM — Ramen Samurai * Free *
A Tokyo designer returns to his tiny hometown to take over his father’s dream of running a ramen shop amid memories of his tumultuous childhood
1:30 PM — Mourning Recipe * Free *
A unique woman leaves behind a recipe book for life to lead her husband and stepdaughter through their grief after her death, with help from a few of her unusual friends
NJaFF uzumasa Wweb4:00 PM — A Tale of Samurai Cooking * Free
This Edo-period drama tells the true story of a ‘kitchen samurai’ who reluctantly married a legendary cook to move his career forward in the midst of revolution
6:30 PM — Uzumasa Limelight  * $10
An aged actor whose specialty is dying in martial arts movies struggles to get by in a changing world before taking on a young woman as a sword-fighting apprentice.

Sunday, August 30
1:00 PM — The God of Ramen * Free
A documentary film on the so-called ‘God of Ramen,’ whose new style of ramen inspired two-hour lines at his tiny restaurant.
3:00 PM — Kasamayaki * $10
In this documentary, a woman shaken by the 2011 disaster returns to her hometown to reconnect with her family and heritage through pottery
5:00 PM — Shady  * $10
A bullied high school girl becomes friends with a popular classmate, but the situation may be too good to be true as she sees her friend’s pleasant demeanor transforming before her eyes

NJaFF kasamayaki Wweb

Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Blvd. in Metro Center. The Watkins Theater is in the main academic building; free parking is available in the campus lot.

 

Photography Alumnae Fill WAG’s August 1 Show with ‘The Spaces We Leave Empty’

Posted on: July 7th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents The Spaces We Leave Empty, an exhibition of photography, video and mixed media by Watkins Photography alumnae Sam Angel, Lisa Deal, Jennifer Georgescu, C. A. Greenlee, Jenna Maurice and Abby Whisenant, at its downtown gallery WAG during the August 1 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl.

Since graduation, the six artists have pursued photography and fine art in Nashville and other cities throughout the country; their show title refers to the photograph’s connection with reality and ultimately with an irretrievable past. It also alludes to the lives as students that they have left behind.

“Each of these women contributed in so many positive ways to the life of the school,” says Watkins Professor and Chair of Photography Robin Paris. “The work in this show demonstrates their commitment to a life of creativity and artistic accomplishment.”

About the artists:

• Sam Angel (Nashville) – samangelphotography.com

Sam Angel

Sam Angel

With a background in photography and sculpture, Sam Angel (Watkins ’12) often finds the two intermingling, resulting in opportunities to create objects that explore how space affects us. Her images and constructed realities examine the spatial relationships within our environments and our selves. 

Lisa Deal

Lisa Deal, “Not Withstanding” (mixed media)

• Lisa Deal (Nashville)

Lisa Deal (Watkins ‘09) is a fine art photographer, mixed media artist, co-founder of Platetone Printmaking press, and an art teacher at Pope John Paul II High School. Her investigation in the design of engaging arts classes has included participation in the Harvard Graduate School of Educations’ program The Arts & Passion-Driven Learning. Her work observes reflexive resistance to impermanence. She examines the tension between the persuasiveness of stasis and submission to continuous transmutation. Rudimentary constructions and permeable figures teeter in the landscapes of her photographic and mixed media configurations, describing the effect that contingencies and proximities bear on behaviors and degrees of comfort as incubated within the body.

• Jennifer Georgescu (San Francisco) – jengeorgescu.com

Jennifer Georgescu, "Blood Roots"

Jennifer Georgescu, “Blood Roots” from The White Series

Jennifer Georgescu’s work describes instinctual aspects of humanity correlating to and differing from societal structuring. With a background in painting and photographic arts, she utilizes medium format film photography, installation, and digital technology. Her projects analyze dualisms in language, relationships, mythologies and control. “I often search for the balance that exists in between these dichotomies. This is how I view humanity; always teetering on the line between fiction and reality, domination and submissiveness, self and other.”

After obtaining a BFA from Watkins in 2008, Georgescu was awarded a yearlong residency at Vanderbilt University’s Gallery F. She has received numerous awards, from Artist Portfolio Magazine, Camera Obscura Journal of Literature and Photography, and the Julia Margaret Cameron Trust. Her works have recently been exhibited in the Masur Museum of Art (Monroe, LA), the Detroit Museum of New Art, and PhotoCenter NW (Seattle).

• CA. Greenlee (Oakland, CA) – greenlee.work

C. A. Greenlee, "Beelining Pinhole Camera on the Field”

C. A. Greenlee, “Beelining Pinhole Camera on the Field”

C. A. Greenlee’s art practice is interdisciplinary, immersive, and research-based. Rooted in the practices and philosophies of photography, she also makes use of other mediums such as performance, drawing, video, sculpture, bookmaking and, most recently, reenactment. A native of Hunstville, Alabama, Greenlee received her MFA from California College of Art after her BFA studies at Watkins (‘12). She works in San Francisco, teaching digital photography at the youth mentoring program First Exposures, science at Camp Galileo, and 4D design at Southern Exposure art gallery.

Statement: “My art practice shifted when I learned how to line honeybees. Beelining is a practice that uses ancient techniques to find a wild hive. In immersive and investigative ways, the process of beelining is similar to the process of art-making. I search and listen. I follow tradition with a critical lens. I honor spontaneity. One small idea strikes a cord, contracts, and expands. I research my own heritage, and study military and historic ephemera. Presently, I am feeling the tension created by making inauthenticity visible while expressing real experiences and referencing actual artifacts.”

• Jenna Maurice (Denver) – jennamaurice.com

Interdisciplinary artist Jenna Maurice earned an MFA from the University of Colorado at Boulder after her BFA studies at Watkins (‘06). Relationships, relational dynamics, communication and problems with language are the things she questions, ponders and experiments with in her work. She is interested in the human experience of empathetic response, as well as the subtleties of the body as a tool for non-verbal communication. Maurice’s current studio practice centers around dabbling in whatever makes sense for solving the problems she wants to address. Her work has been exhibited in solo and group shows, including at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Boulder, Deluge Contemporary in Victoria, Canada, and the Contemporary LivingGallery in Lecce, Italy. She is presently interim director of admissions at Watkins.

• Abby Whisenant (Nashville)

An artist, storyteller and community-builder, Abby Whisenant graduated from Watkins in 2008. She has taught photography workshops to children, teens and adults over the last ten years and is currently the Program Coordinator for the Underground Art Studio at Oasis Center in Nashville, a program she founded in 2013. As a creative professional in the youth development field, she

Abby Whisenant, image for Klexos series

Abby Whisenant, image for Klexos series

offers teens an opportunity to use creativity as a pathway for self-exploration, healing, community service, and transformative justice. Whisenant recently initiated an interactive mural series with Nashville artists and youth involved in the Davidson County Juvenile Court, which received funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. One of her public art designs was also selected for the upcoming round of Bike Racks by the Metro Nashville Arts Commission and is scheduled for installation at Edgehill Public Library in Spring 2016.

Statement: “Klexos is a playful investigation of impermanence and experience. While visiting my hometown of Yazoo City, Mississippi, I explore places steeped in seemingly banal memories that have followed me for years like a restless ghost. Using raw imagery void of little to no physical connection to the memory itself, I create a space to honor the ordinary places and moments in my life and project onto it a series of changing layers.”

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

firstsaturdayartcrawl-bordered WwebWAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues.  For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

About WAG
The Watkins Arcade Gallery–WAG–is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape. The venue will present shows year-round featuring work by Watkins students, alumni and other professional artists. For inquiries, contact [email protected]. WAG is the second Watkins-run gallery space, joining the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, the primary exhibiting space on the College’s campus in Metro Center.

Also opening August 1, nearby in the Arcade at 40AU Gallery (space 69), alumna Jaime Raybin (’06) will present Composite Internet Boyfriend.

JaimeRaybin Aug1_2015show evite morecreepy WwebThe show is an autobiographical narrative, exploring the nature of loneliness and a longing for connection: after an 11-year relationship ended, Raybin downloaded a dating app. The work includes personal writing (handwritten directly on the gallery walls) that jumps between the real world and speculation about the person on the other end of the conversation, and watercolor illustrations, as well as extended interactions with fake profiles of celebrities. A zine version of the show will be available for sale at the opening.

Raybin’s exhibition history includes Northwestern University, the University of the South, Athens Institute for Contemporary Art, the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, and threesquared gallery.  In 2014 she was awarded a fellowship to attend a month-long residency program at CAC Woodside in Troy, NY. She also recently completed residencies at Grin City Collective and Tiny Circus, both in Grinnell, IA, and in New Orleans. For more information, contact [email protected].

 

Click to enlarge evite

Click to enlarge evite

Watkins Artists Find A Show ‘Place’ at Global Mall

Posted on: June 29th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

In Place, a group exhibition organized and curated by Watkins Fine Art senior Mika Agari and Fine Art alumnae Alexine Rioux ( ‘14) and Kayla Saito (‘15), has found an unusual location for its July 10-12 showing: Storefront #122 of The Global Mall (formerly Hickory Hollow Mall) in Antioch, Tennessee.

Featuring work from 26 artists from across the U.S., In Place opens Friday, July 10, from 3:30 to 8:30 pm, and continues Saturday, July 11, 8 am to 8 pm, and Sunday, July 12, noon to 6 pm.

Chelsea Velaga

Chelsea Velagast, “sandast, baela (resist, repress),” sand installation and drawings

The objective of In Place is to open up a dialogue on contemporary art and contemporary consumer culture. Staging the exhibition in an entropic consumer space allows the work — which includes installation, drawings, video, animation, screen prints, mixed media, photography and sound recordings — to function outside of a traditional gallery context and lends to a discussion of art existing within a consumer society.

The Global Mall (5252 Hickory Hollow Parkway) was once a thriving consumer space formerly known Hickory Hollow Mall. Many of the previously occupied stores in the Global Mall are currently empty.  Storefront #122 is a former clothing store with over 3,000 feet of space.

In Place artists

From Nashville:

  • Chelsea Velaga

    Aaron Harper

    Aaron Harper, “Totem Piece,” oil on linen

  • Blake Holland (Watkins alumnus)
  • David Anderson (Watkins student)
  • Mati Hays (Watkins student)
  • Kayla Saito (Watkins alumna/curator)
  • Aaron Harper (Watkins student)
  • David Hellams (Watkins staff)
  • Zack Rafuls (Watkins alumnus)
  • David King (Watkins student)
  • Ariel Lavery (Watkins faculty)
  • Sophia Stevenson (Watkins student)
  • Marlos E’van (Watkins student)
  • Morgan Higby-Flowers (Watkins faculty)
  • Mika Agari (Watkins student/curator)
  • Alexine Rioux (Watkins alumna/curator)
    and

    David Hellams

    David Hellams, photo from “Crappy Magic”

  • Courtney Asztalos, Los Angeles, CA
  • Michael Benevenia, Baltimore, MD
  • Alice Gadzinski, Baltimore MD
  • Matthew Gualco, Brooklyn, NY
  • Lauren Jo, Beaver Falls, PA
  • Angelo Kozonis
  • Maria Lux, Champaign IL
  • Simone Schiffmacher, San Antonio, TX
  • Kate Shannon, Mansfield, Ohio
  • Cyane Tornatzky, Fort Collins, CO
  • Christina Yglesias, Oakland, CA

    InPlace Ariel Lavery, Bits-and-bellows1 Wweb

    Ariel Lavery, “Bits and Bellows,” installation

 

 

Click to enlarge evite

Click to enlarge evite

Watkins Welcomes Dr. Jay Kline as President on July 15

Posted on: June 16th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

The Board of Trustees of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film has announced the appointment of Joseph (Jay) Kline to the position of president, effective July 15, 2015.

Currently Dean of the College of Fine Arts at Eastern New Mexico University (ENMU) in Portales, Dr. Kline brings nearly 20 years of higher education administrative experience to his new role at Watkins, with expertise in student recruitment, interdisciplinary programming, curriculum assessment, fundraising and strategic partnerships. He holds a Ph.D. in Fine Arts and his career has also included distinguished work as a teacher, writer and performing artist.

In making the announcement, board chair Samuel E. Stumpf, Jr. said, “Jay brings a wealth of arts education experience to Watkins. We believe that he is uniquely qualified to build upon Watkins’ many past accomplishments and to lead Watkins to an even stronger future.”

Dr. Kline becomes the 16th president in Watkins’ 130-year history, succeeding Ellen L. Meyer, who is retiring after seven years in office.

“I am honored to be joining Watkins at this point in its most distinguished history,” said Dr. Kline. “The college is a cultural and social institution of Nashville and has grown to become a regional leader in arts education. From its dynamic and engaged board of trustees, to its acclaimed faculty and staff, to, most importantly, a student body of great accomplishment and enormous potential, there is not one element of the institution that is anything but of the highest caliber. I am  impressed in every way and fully committed to lead the college to even greater levels of achievement.”

Prior to ENMU, Dr. Kline was Professor and Chair, Performing Arts Department, and Producing Artistic Director, School of Performing Arts, at the Savannah College of Art and Design. He also served as Chair of the Departments of Production Design and of Dramatic Writing. Previously, he was Associate Professor and Chair, Performing and Fine Arts Department, at DeSales University (Center Valley, PA), with executive supervision of majors in TV/Film, theatre and dance and oversight of the university’s fine art and music offerings. While at DeSales, he was a member of Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival’s artistic staff.

Dr. Kline will assume leadership as Watkins bolsters its position as one of the nation’s leading colleges of art and design through increasing recognition of work by its accomplished students, alumni and faculty. In addition to expanded BFA degree programs in Film, Fine Art, Graphic Design, Interior Design and Photography, a BA program in Art, and Certificate programs in Film and Interior Design, recent Watkins milestones include reaffirmation of accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, the opening of a downtown exhibition space, WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery), and increased Community Education and Pre-College Program enrollment.

The presidential appointment follows a five-month national search conducted by a committee of Watkins trustees, staff and faculty representatives, chaired by board member Larry Papel.

“Jay’s demonstrated leadership skills, understanding of the Watkins mission and curriculum, and past success in administration and the classroom distinguished him as the leading candidate among dozens of applications,” said Mr. Papel. “The committee is confident that Jay’s presidency will not only enhance Watkins but greatly benefit the Nashville community as well.”

Dr. Kline holds a Bachelor of Arts from Colorado State University, a Master of Fine Arts from the Catholic University of America, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Fine Arts from Texas Tech University.

‘Number’ Chooses Watkins Senior David Anderson for Cover Art

Posted on: June 12th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Congratulations to Fine Art senior David Anderson, whose artwork  graces the cover of the Spring 2015 issue of the independent arts journal Number. 

David Anderson, "Distance"

David Anderson, “Distance”

Distance, an 8″x10″ oil paint on panel, is a meditation on organic and patterned structure, and references clothing, textile, and the body.

Check out Number: 82 for interviews and reviews, including one of the March show of photography at WAG, and Living.

WAG’s July 3 Show Salutes Paintings by Casey Payne

Posted on: June 12th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film will present paintings by Watkins senior Casey Payne at its downtown gallery WAG during the July edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl. This year, the crawl will be held on Friday, July 3, to avoid conflicts with Independence Day activities.

Click to enlarge evite

Click to enlarge evite

A native of Amherst County, Virginia, Payne is studying for a BFA in Fine Arts, and works primarily in painting and printmaking. His work has been seen in the Co. H group shows Attention (Track One) and Mystic Truths (Currey Gallery), and in The Philosophy of Risk (Haus/40AU), a collaboration with assistant professor Brady Haston.

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

firstsaturdayartcrawl-bordered WwebWAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues. For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

Watkins Gets SACSCOC Stamp (Again)

Posted on: June 12th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Terrific news! Earlier today, Watkins learned that the Board of Trustees of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) has voted to reaffirm our accreditation. Watkins received its initial accreditation in 2010, and this reaffirmation was part of the required five-year interim review.

SACSCOC is the regional body for the accreditation of degree-granting higher education institutions in the Southern states. It serves as the common denominator of shared values and practices among the diverse institutions in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Latin America and other international sites approved by the Commission on Colleges that award associate, baccalaureate, master’s, or doctoral degrees.

Their mission is to assure the educational quality and improve the effectiveness of its member institutions, with core values of integrity, continuous quality improvement, peer review/self-regulation, accountability, student learning and transparency.

Congratulations and thanks to all faculty and staff who served on committees, wrote and researched during this lengthy process,  most especially to Vice President for Academic Affairs Joy McKenzie, our accreditation liaison.

 

Ross Denton and Emily Sue Laird Make Their Marks on WAG at June 6 Show

Posted on: May 19th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents Amour fo’ Phallus, a riotous and ridiculous show of drawings and animation by Watkins alumni Ross Denton and Emily Sue Laird, at its downtown gallery WAG during the June 6 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl.

Amour fo' Phallus ELaird_RDenton 6.6.15 WwebWith a goal of celebrating the absurd aspects of life in an innocent and fun format, Denton and Laird will fill the gallery from floor to ceiling with chalk images drawn directly on the walls and architectural fixtures of the space. The show will also feature their chalk animation of a budding, blossoming and decaying Titan Arum (Amorphophallus titanium), one of the largest and most rare flowering plants on earth. (It’s also known as the corpse flower for an odor reminiscent of the smell of a decomposing mammal.)

“Emily Sue Laird and Ross Denton are kindred spirits with a shared passion for wandering, drawing inspiration from serendipitous discoveries and the unlooked for,” said Dan Brawner, chair of the Department of Graphic Design. “Amour fo’ Phallus is the catalyst for a creative collaboration and offers a unique insight into the productive minds of two lovers of life.”

About the artists:

EmilySusanLaird WwebEmily Sue Laird is a Nashville-based visual artist, production designer and installation artist who earned a BFA in Fine Art from Watkins College of Art, Design & Film in 2011. In the past few years, Emily Sue has designed custom work for brands such as West Elm, Janet’s Planet, My Gnome on the Roam, Holiday Inn Suites and Bongo Java, and custom art for multiple music festivals including Marathon Music Works’ Block Party and Nashville Scene’s 25th Birthday Bash. Since 2014 she has been owner and lead designer at Artist Nashville, providing a variety of creative services: mural projects, graphic design, illustration, chalk art and set design for film and television, fashion shows, music videos, tours and in-store retail displays. Her sculptures, textile art and paintings, which frequently incorporate reuse materials, have been shown in several downtown arcade and Wedgewood-Houston galleries and she has been featured by the Nashville Scene, Native Magazine, Lightning 100 and Nashville Arts Magazine. She’s currently working on the second edition of Replication, Nashville’s only juried 3D printing show, in September.

RossDenton WwebRoss Denton is a 2015 graduate of Watkins, earning a BFA in Graphic Design with a concentration in illustration. He grew up on the South Harpeth River outside of Nashville, surrounded by forests and hills, where he never had to wear any shoes. Legend has it that Ross started to draw when he first held a pencil at the age of two and he never stopped. He has won local, district and national Student American Advertising Federation (Addy) awards for illustration, and his work has been published in the international design journal Graphis.

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

firstsaturdayartcrawl-bordered WwebWAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues.  For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

Ross Denton for WAGAbout WAG
The Watkins Arcade Gallery–WAG–is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape. The venue will present shows year-round featuring work by Watkins students, alumni and other professional artists. For inquiries, contact [email protected]. WAG is the second Watkins-run gallery space, joining the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, the primary exhibiting space on the College’s campus in Metro Center.

Artists Explore Feminist ‘Point of Reference’ in Currey Show Opening May 28

Posted on: May 15th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents Point of Reference,  a student-organized, mixed media show exploring definitions of feminist ideals, from May 28 through July 18 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

The exhibition’s opening reception on Thursday, May 28, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. is free and open to the public.

Lily Adcock, "Transgression"

Lily Adcock, “Transgression” (2014)

Participating are eleven artists – current and former Watkins students and recent alumni from Watkins and MTSU – committed to challenging themselves as feminists through the art they create.

  • Lily Adcock, Watkins, Fine Arts ’15 (painting)
  • Burt Blackwood (video)
  • Peggy Corlew (writer of exhibition manifesto)
  • Ashley Doggett, Watkins, Fine Arts junior (multidisciplinary work)
  • Kelsey Goessman, Watkins, Graphic Design ’15 (multidisciplinary work)
  • Corrina Joyner, Watkins, Fine Arts sophomore (multidisciplinary work)
  • Mika Mollenkopf, MTSU, Fine Arts ‘15 (sculpture)
  • Maxwell Parker (photography)
  • Jill Schumann, Watkins, Photography ‘15 (photography)
  • Sophia Stevenson, Watkins, Fine Arts senior (sculpture)
  • Laura Whitfield, Watkins, Photography ’15 (photography)
Sophia Stevenson,  untitled (fabric slip cast, 2014)

Sophia Stevenson, untitled (fabric slip cast, 2014)

Exhibition statement:  Feminist ideologies are easily misinterpreted throughout history; our departure will constitute our own point of reference. This exhibition explores the ideals of feminism historically pre-defined. No longer passively accepting all knowledge as truth, we are actively approaching our individual experiences, and have formed a group to create our dialogue with stories untold. The purpose of this group is to learn and share the knowledge and experiences of feminist artists living within the contemporary world.

Point of Reference was organized by Jill Schumann and originally shown in Kent State University’s Main Hall Art Gallery, March 10-April 6. Read more here.

Manifesto statement:  In this defining manifesto, we focus more on our individuality, our mode of thought and philosophy, and our explicit wishes starting to turn to action more than a rigid call to action requested of the public. It is a thought imbued blueprint, positioning as an upbeat and positive threshold to the road of our futures, and fuel and inspiration for battling obstacles of patriarchy, or perhaps, our own fears. It’s gentle nature inversely and forcefully reminds us, that yes, our cause is worth it, we are worth it, and that feminism is important.

Click to read more: Peggy Corlew, A Moving Manifesto

Currey Gallery’s summer hours are Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

 

Make A Note for Fifth Annual Handmade & Bound on Oct. 2-3

Posted on: May 7th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Deadline for exhibition & zine entries and vendor registration is Sept. 22

The fifth annual edition of Handmade & Bound Nashville (H&BN), a two-day celebration of print, paper and book, will unfold Friday, October 2, and Saturday, October 3, at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film. The free, family-friendly event–focused on unique and handcrafted book creations with elements of art fair and literary gathering–is presented by the Watkins Library and the Community Education department and features a gallery exhibition, zine collection, marketplace with dozens of vendors, and demos and hands-on activities.

HBN2014 9218 gallery viewers WwebOn Friday, October 2, the festival’s exhibition, Bound Together, will open in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m.

Funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, Bound Together will showcase handmade books of poetry and collage work inspired by the many definitions of family. The exhibition is the culmination of a series of summer community workshops, led by local book artists, writers and Watkins Community Education, with the Looby Community Center, Casa Azafran, FiftyForward Bordeaux, Oasis Center and Catholic Charities Elder Refugees. Participants will follow writing prompts to help them develop their own explanation of family and create artwork for their bound volumes.

CALL FOR ARTISTS: Additionally, local book artists, writers, and other artists are invited to submit their own individual pieces, artists’ books or artwork based on family for inclusion in Bound Together, which will be on view in the Currey Gallery through October 16.

NEA-color logo WwebThe work’s title/description, artist’s name, address, phone, email and occupation should be included with each piece and sent to Watkins Community Education, 2298 Rosa L. Parks Blvd., Nashville, TN 37228, Attn: Mary Beth Harding. Submissions deadline is September 22.

HBN2014 9443 Amaranthus pic WwebOn Saturday, October 3, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Watkins’  main academic building, dozens of local and regional artists, indie publishers and distributors, and book aficionados will come together to sell, trade and buy handmade and affordable publications, printed matter and book-themed creations at the book arts marketplace. Vendors and artists will also lead demonstrations and hands-on art- and craft-making activities for children and adults.

Additionally, Karla’s Catering will be set up to serve authentic Mexican foods; the first 100 empanadas will be free to H&BN attendees (limit one per guest).

VENDOR SIGN-UP: Vendor registration is open via  handmadeboundnashville.com, Handmade & Bound Nashville on Facebook, or by contacting the Watkins Library at 615.277.7427. Reservation deadline is September 22.

illustration: Ross Denton '15

illustration by Ross Denton ’15

Marketplace tables are available to creators of artists’ books or other printed media; independent publishers of zines, mini-comics, chapbooks, etc.; small distributors of zines, graphic novels and other printed media; and producers of book arts, handmade journals, one-of-a-kind book objects, paper and book-themed jewelry, gifts and accessories, and sellers of book, art and printmaking materials.

HBN2014 9394 zine readers WwebConcurrently in the Watkins Library, H&BN will host Zine-Stravaganza, a display of community-submitted zines in all formats and on all subjects. H&BN’s 2012 Zine-O-Rama introduced the world of zines to the broader Nashville community, and Watkins holds a substantial collection of personal zines, cookzines, fanzines, artzines, cut and paste, comics, minis, and mental health zines.

ZINE ENTRIES:  Zine submissions (work may be stapled or tied, screen printed or Xeroxed) plus optional artist statement/bio should be sent by September 22 to the Watkins Library, 2298 Rosa L. Parks Blvd, Nashville, TN 37228, Attn: Lisa Williams.

Artober logo

The Handmade & Bound Nashville festival is an official, registered event of Artober, a broadly collaborative promotional initiative designed to highlight, inform and inspire the community’s participation in the wide range of arts activities offered in the Nashville area during the month of October.

Community Fdtn logoHandmade & Bound Nashville, 5th Edition is hosted by Watkins Community Education and the Watkins Library and is funded in part through the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. Bound Together is funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Additional sponsors include the Nashville Scene.

Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in Metro Center; free parking is available in the campus lot. MTA’s Metro Center/Route 9 stops directly in front of Watkins (across from the Looby Center).

HBN2015_nashville_arts_leaderboard Wweb

H&BN design by Sara Strese ’13

FAQ

HBN2014 suitcase display 9439 WwebWhat’s in the marketplace? Dozens of vendors with artists’ books, small press items like comics, mini-comics, graphic novels and zines, blank books, limited-edition prints, handmade paper, art supplies, literary journals, book flair, jewelry, ephemera packs, paper cut and letterpress cards and postcards – plus demos on bookbinding, paperfolding, printmaking, paper cuts and art-making activities for children. Vendors will be posted to handmadeboundnashville.com as they become available.

HBN2014 artist book cut out cover WwebWhat’s an artist’s book? An artist’s book is a work of art realized in a book-like format. They are usually one-of-a-kind creations or published in small editions, and can employ a form other than bound printed sheet. What truly makes an artist’s book is the artist’s intent, and artists have used the book as inspiration in a myriad of ways and techniques, from traditional to the experimental, to handwritten or handmade booklets, to magazine-like publications

What’s a zine? A zine (pronounced “zeen,” as in “magazine”) is a self-published, small circulation, non-commercial booklet or magazine, usually produced by one person or a few individuals. Zines range from small photocopied booklets, to handwritten or handmade booklets, to magazine-like publications.

Katie Gonzalez, linenlaidfelt

John Porcellino, King-Cat

John Porcellino, King-Cat

2014 gallery show “Poetry and Prints”