Archive for the ‘Fine Art News’ Category

Ross Denton and Emily Sue Laird Make Their Marks on WAG at June 6 Show

Posted on: May 19th, 2015 by Caroline Davis No Comments

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents Amour fo’ Phallus, a riotous and ridiculous show of drawings and animation by Watkins alumni Ross Denton and Emily Sue Laird, at its downtown gallery WAG during the June 6 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl.

Amour fo' Phallus ELaird_RDenton 6.6.15 WwebWith a goal of celebrating the absurd aspects of life in an innocent and fun format, Denton and Laird will fill the gallery from floor to ceiling with chalk images drawn directly on the walls and architectural fixtures of the space. The show will also feature their chalk animation of a budding, blossoming and decaying Titan Arum (Amorphophallus titanium), one of the largest and most rare flowering plants on earth. (It’s also known as the corpse flower for an odor reminiscent of the smell of a decomposing mammal.)

“Emily Sue Laird and Ross Denton are kindred spirits with a shared passion for wandering, drawing inspiration from serendipitous discoveries and the unlooked for,” said Dan Brawner, chair of the Department of Graphic Design. “Amour fo’ Phallus is the catalyst for a creative collaboration and offers a unique insight into the productive minds of two lovers of life.”

About the artists:

EmilySusanLaird WwebEmily Sue Laird is a Nashville-based visual artist, production designer and installation artist who earned a BFA in Fine Art from Watkins College of Art, Design & Film in 2011. In the past few years, Emily Sue has designed custom work for brands such as West Elm, Janet’s Planet, My Gnome on the Roam, Holiday Inn Suites and Bongo Java, and custom art for multiple music festivals including Marathon Music Works’ Block Party and Nashville Scene’s 25th Birthday Bash. Since 2014 she has been owner and lead designer at Artist Nashville, providing a variety of creative services: mural projects, graphic design, illustration, chalk art and set design for film and television, fashion shows, music videos, tours and in-store retail displays. Her sculptures, textile art and paintings, which frequently incorporate reuse materials, have been shown in several downtown arcade and Wedgewood-Houston galleries and she has been featured by the Nashville Scene, Native Magazine, Lightning 100 and Nashville Arts Magazine. She’s currently working on the second edition of Replication, Nashville’s only juried 3D printing show, in September.

RossDenton WwebRoss Denton is a 2015 graduate of Watkins, earning a BFA in Graphic Design with a concentration in illustration. He grew up on the South Harpeth River outside of Nashville, surrounded by forests and hills, where he never had to wear any shoes. Legend has it that Ross started to draw when he first held a pencil at the age of two and he never stopped. He has won local, district and national Student American Advertising Federation (Addy) awards for illustration, and his work has been published in the international design journal Graphis.

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

firstsaturdayartcrawl-bordered WwebWAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues.  For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

Ross Denton for WAGAbout WAG
The Watkins Arcade Gallery–WAG–is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape. The venue will present shows year-round featuring work by Watkins students, alumni and other professional artists. For inquiries, contact WAG@watkins.edu. WAG is the second Watkins-run gallery space, joining the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, the primary exhibiting space on the College’s campus in Metro Center.

Artists Explore Feminist ‘Point of Reference’ in Currey Show Opening May 28

Posted on: May 15th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents Point of Reference,  a student-organized, mixed media show exploring definitions of feminist ideals, from May 28 through July 18 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

The exhibition’s opening reception on Thursday, May 28, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. is free and open to the public.

Lily Adcock, "Transgression"

Lily Adcock, “Transgression” (2014)

Participating are eleven artists – current and former Watkins students and recent alumni from Watkins and MTSU – committed to challenging themselves as feminists through the art they create.

  • Lily Adcock, Watkins, Fine Arts ’15 (painting)
  • Burt Blackwood (video)
  • Peggy Corlew (writer of exhibition manifesto)
  • Ashley Doggett, Watkins, Fine Arts junior (multidisciplinary work)
  • Kelsey Goessman, Watkins, Graphic Design ’15 (multidisciplinary work)
  • Corrina Joyner, Watkins, Fine Arts sophomore (multidisciplinary work)
  • Mika Mollenkopf, MTSU, Fine Arts ‘15 (sculpture)
  • Maxwell Parker (photography)
  • Jill Schumann, Watkins, Photography ‘15 (photography)
  • Sophia Stevenson, Watkins, Fine Arts senior (sculpture)
  • Laura Whitfield, Watkins, Photography ’15 (photography)
Sophia Stevenson,  untitled (fabric slip cast, 2014)

Sophia Stevenson, untitled (fabric slip cast, 2014)

Exhibition statement:  Feminist ideologies are easily misinterpreted throughout history; our departure will constitute our own point of reference. This exhibition explores the ideals of feminism historically pre-defined. No longer passively accepting all knowledge as truth, we are actively approaching our individual experiences, and have formed a group to create our dialogue with stories untold. The purpose of this group is to learn and share the knowledge and experiences of feminist artists living within the contemporary world.

Point of Reference was organized by Jill Schumann and originally shown in Kent State University’s Main Hall Art Gallery, March 10-April 6. Read more here.

Manifesto statement:  In this defining manifesto, we focus more on our individuality, our mode of thought and philosophy, and our explicit wishes starting to turn to action more than a rigid call to action requested of the public. It is a thought imbued blueprint, positioning as an upbeat and positive threshold to the road of our futures, and fuel and inspiration for battling obstacles of patriarchy, or perhaps, our own fears. It’s gentle nature inversely and forcefully reminds us, that yes, our cause is worth it, we are worth it, and that feminism is important.

Click to read more: Peggy Corlew, A Moving Manifesto

Currey Gallery’s summer hours are Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

 

Watkins Visiting Artists Series Concludes May 1 with Artist/Activist Ashley Hunt

Posted on: April 22nd, 2015 by Caroline Davis

The artist, activist and filmmaker Ashley Hunt—who merges art and politics in work concerned with questions of institutional power—will speak at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film on Friday, May 1, as part of the Watkins Visiting Artists Series.

The presentation, which begins at 6:00 p.m. in the Watkins Theater, is free and the public is invited. The Watkins Visiting Artists Series is funded in part by a grant from Humanities Tennessee, an independent affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

(Hunt’s visit was previously announced for 2/19, but severe winter weather forced the rescheduling.)

AshleyHunt headshot WwebOver the past 15 years, through various projects employing video, photography, mapping and writing, Hunt has focused on ways people understand, respond to and conceive of themselves within systems of power. Rather than seeing art and activism as distinct pursuits, he approaches them as complementary, drawing upon social movements and contemporary cultural theory as his work addresses important trends towards documentary and participatory practices in contemporary art.

“Ashley Hunt has addressed some of the most pressing social issues of our era, and he has done so with political savvy and artistic sophistication,” said Tom Williams, assistant professor of art history at Watkins. “His work offers a permanent rebuke to anyone who still believes that the merger of art and politics means the triumph of politics over art.”

About Ashley Hunt

Ashley Hunt has played the role of an activist-journalist in his investigations of power and politics in contemporary society, using video, photography, mapping and writing to engage contemporary social movements and public discourse. His work addresses systems that enable certain people to accumulate power and those that disempower others.

Among his most celebrated works are his ongoing video series on the prison system, entitled The Corrections Documentary Project (and which includes footage he filmed in Tennessee), and his Prison Maps.

AshleyHunt-6 scribble man Wweb

In The Corrections Documentary Project, Hunt investigates the institution of the prison and, more specifically, how incarceration helps structure and preserve racial and economic divisions within society. A 2001 film Corrections (57 minutes) looks at the privatization of the prison system, exposing the conflict between for-profit corporations focused on pleasing investors and the communities that must deal with the consequences of high incarceration rates. Probing further to explore links between political campaign strategies and the increasing penalties for nonviolent crimes, Hunt uncovers a complex system of desires and incentives that lie behind the growth of the American prison system.

Other investigations by Hunt have focused on community identity and the demise of welfare state institutions (Communograph), war and disaster capitalism (9 Scripts from a Nation at War, A World Map: in which we see…), documentary representations (As Flowers Turn Toward the Sun, Par Course A), and political activism (Undeliverable Address). His 2010 performance, Notes on the Emptying of a City, explored the first-person politics of being in New Orleans with a camera in the months following Hurricane Katrina, when he engaged with community activists to research the city’s refusal to evacuate the Orleans Parish Prison. His work has been screened and exhibited at the P.S.1/MOMA, the Tate Modern, the Museum of Modern Art, the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore, and the Martin Luther King Jr. Center in Atlanta. He was also included in Documenta 12 in Kassel, Germany and the 3rd Bucharest Biennial. In 2007, Hunt collaborated with Sharon Hayes and other artists on 9 Scripts from a Nation at War, a project that has been the subject of a number of exhibitions internationally.

Ashley Hunt at TEDxCalArts, March 2013

Based in Los Angeles, Hunt is Co-Director of the Program in Photography and Media at the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts). He is an alumnus of the University of California at Irvine (BFA) and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (MFA), and participated in the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program.

Hear Ashley Hunt at TEDxCalArts: Liveness, performance, and this exact place in time

Now in its fifth year, The Watkins Visiting Artists Series (VAS), with support from the Humanities Tennessee Grant Program, welcomes nationally and internationally recognized fine artists, designers, filmmakers, educators and critics to the campus and the community. Watkins full house 9561 RHQuaytman lecture 1.29.14 WwebThe guest artists, whose work crosses many disciplinary boundaries, give public presentations, sharing their expertise and perspectives on their careers and providing insight into issues facing contemporary artists and designers. The VAS offers the area’s cultural community a rare opportunity to engage the work and ideas of trendsetting visual artists, designers, filmmakers and intellectuals. The critically acclaimed initiative has not only brought a number of internationally renowned artists to Nashville—like first-time visitors Harrell Fletcher, R. H. Quaytman, David Hilliard, Jonathan Katz, Alec Soth and Artemio Rodriguez—but it has also invigorated the local art scene by introducing artists working in new media and performance—artists like Nick Briz, Jon Satrom and Liz Magic Laser (2013 New York Armory Artist)—and those expanding the parameters of traditional media and art practice—such as Chris Sickels, Deborah Luster (2013 Guggenheim Fellow) and Natalia Almada (2013 MacArthur Fellow).

The 2015 Watkins VAS is a three-lecture initiative, with letterer/illustrator Jessica Hische on January 22 and multiple-media artist/writer Martha Rosler on April 16.

Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot. For more information, including updates to programming and future series guests, visit this website or call 615-383-4848.

ht_colorFounded in 1973, Humanities Tennessee is a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to promoting lifelong learning, civil discourse, and an appreciation of history, diversity, and community among Tennesseans. Statewide programs include the annual Southern Festival of Books: A Celebration of the Written Word℠, the Appalachian and Tennessee Young Writers’ Workshops, a variety of History & Culture programs, Grants & Awards for teachers and community organizationsChapter16.org, among many others.

Click to enlarge evite

Click to enlarge evite

 

Watkins Concludes BFA Thesis Series with Luisiana Mera, Weng Tze Yang and Zack Rafuls on May 7

Posted on: April 14th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents fine art and photography from Luisiana Mera (Añoranza), Weng Tze Yang (Idle Light) and Zack Rafuls (Props for a Film), opening Thursday, May 7, with a reception from 5:30 to 8 p.m. The final of four installments in the Spring 2015 BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition series, the triple show will be on display in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery through May 18.

Luisiana Mera, self portrait (closeup)

Luisiana Mera, self portrait (closeup)

Luisiana Mera, Panama City, Panama – luisimera.comluisianamera.tumblr.com
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Añoranza (charcoal on paper, oil paint on canvas)

Luisiana Mera works with charcoal to create delicately rendered drawings that are tactile, velvety and dreamlike. The medium and the slow process support the intent of the drawing: building and erasing with charcoal mimic the idea of building a complex, intimate image. Her artistic practice is centered on a critical investigation of the body and human psychological moments. She reflects on social and cultural conventions, paying close attention to portraying the fragile, particular details that distinguish each person, objects and places. These details such as moles, scars, wrinkles and textures highlight the history and subjective reading of the individual. Extended and concentrated looking, versus merely seeing, encourages more complex meditations on the human condition and its environment.

Born and reared in Panama City, Panama, Mera moved to the U.S. as a teen, and was graduated from Nashville School of the Arts. Her work has been exhibited extensively on campus and at Cheekwood, Cummins Station and WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery). She has won multiple awards including the Robb Swaney Prize for Excellence in Visual Expression and first place at the Currey Juried Student Exhibition; this past fall her work was selected for inclusion in INDA 9 (9th International Drawing Annual), a competitive publication of works of contemporary drawing.

Weng Tze Yang, untitled

Weng Tze Yang, untitled

Weng Tze Yang, Ipoh City, Perak, Malaysia – wengtzeyang.com
BFA in Photography
Show title: Idle Light (photographs with mixed media, photo installations)

A photographer who works with abstract photographs and installations, Weng Tze Yang seeks to bring in the act of contemplation into the viewing experience for her audience. Her photographs are abstract with elements of familiarities; the subtle shades of colors, the play of shadows and light creates a poem that resembles her view of spaces. She also emphasizes on the physicality of the materials she uses for her work as they affect how she display them in the gallery. By creating installations using her photographs, she expresses her own reality through her work, hoping that her viewers will be able to do so, engaging their own perceptions and thoughts with her images.

Yang, who also has an interest in art history, has exhibited off-campus at WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery), COOP, Fort Houston, Nostos Gallery and at the University of the South’s Carlos Gallery, and served as an exhibition intern at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts.

Zack Rafuls, "All of My Black Clothes in a Pile"

Zack Rafuls, “All of My Black Clothes in a Pile”

Zack Rafuls, Chattanooga, TN – zackrafuls.com
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Props for a Film (soft sculpture, screen-printing, tropical plant, conceptual sound, bisque-fired ceramic, large-scale drawing

Zack Rafuls is a maker of art objects with an interdisciplinary practice that incorporates a wide-range of media and modes of making. A native of Miami, Florida, he moved to Tennessee in his early teens and to Nashville in 2011. His work – primarily sculpture, installation, painting, printmaking and video – has been exhibited at Ground Floor Gallery, the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery at Watkins, Track One, Cummins Station, and in solo and group shows at WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery); he is currently co-curator at the Packing Plant. Chair of the art collective Co. H, Zack has interned at Zeitgeist Gallery and studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Props for a Film presents a series of eclectic objects that function as components to a fragmented, semi-autobiographical narrative. At the heart of the work is a preoccupation with the appropriation of image as a means to construct a counter-cultural identity.

Click to enlarge evite

Click to enlarge evite

The exhibitions and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot.

The Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery is located in the main academic building on the Watkins campus. Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.

Mati Hays and Blake Holland Take ‘Victory Laps’ at WAG’s May 2 show

Posted on: April 13th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents Victory Laps, an exhibition by Watkins students Mati Hays and Blake Holland, at its downtown gallery WAG during the May 2 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl.

Victory Laps – integrating sculpture, photography, and video – examines anxieties about youth. While Mati (a Fine Art sophomore) seeks power in claiming the future, Blake (a senior in the Film School) finds control in grounding his past. By pulling from the past and framing the future, the work acts as a stand-in for their understanding of the present, with each artist allotting objects a great amount of responsibility.

Mati Hays, "Proud of You"

Mati Hays, “Proud of You”

While their processes are different in approach, through similar interests, perspectives and fixations, they both produce work that responds to one another on a literal and visceral level. By placing their respective works within a shared space, the crossing of past and future reflects the influence they have on each other.

As a filmmaker, Blake approaches art making in the same way he approaches story telling. Fully understanding the danger this poses, he attempts to reduce his own life into a manageable narrative by toying with ritual, contextualizing objects, and examining lineage.

Addressing the obsession she has with her future, Mati plays with the association of brands and status, using materials that inherently reflect ideals of luxury and uniformity. With her background in fashion and design, these access points allow her work to speak through the visual language of her generation.

About the artists:

A sophomore at Watkins pursuing a BFA in Fine Art, Mati works in a variety of media such as installation, sculpture, video, photography, fashion and product design. Her most recent involvements have been in the Nashville fashion community, interning for local designers, styling, and working for high-end boutiques throughout the city. Mati will continue her college career at Parsons The New School for Design in New York in the fall.

Blake Holland, "Buzz (Just For You)"

Blake Holland, “Buzz (Just For You)”

Blake is a senior in The Film School, with concentrations in directing and screenwriting. Two of his films have been accepted into the Nashville Film Festival as part of the Tennessee Shorts section: “Rust” (2014) and “Summer Haze” (2015). As a council member of the art collective Co. H, he has exhibited work at the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery at Watkins, Fort Houston, and WAG. Holland works as an editor and videographer on documentary projects with Crackerfarm, and makes music as Spring Blake.

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

Art Crawl logoWAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues.  For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

About WAG
The Watkins Arcade Gallery–WAG–is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape. The venue will present shows year-round featuring work by Watkins students, alumni and other professional artists. For inquiries, contact WAG@watkins.edu. WAG is the second Watkins-run gallery space, joining the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, the primary exhibiting space on the College’s campus in Metro Center.

Spring BFA Thesis Series Continues April 23 with Heather Barrie, Jill Schumann and Robin Sinnett

Posted on: March 30th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film’s Spring 2015 BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions continues with work from Heather Barrie, Jill Schumann and Robin Sinnett. Third in a four-part series from 12 graduating students in the Departments of Fine Art and Photography, their triple exhibition opens Thursday, April 23, with a reception from 5:30 to 8 p.m., and will be on display in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery through May 4.

Note: This exhibition contains images that could be considered inappropriate for certain audiences, especially young children.

Heather Barrie

Heather Barrie

Heather Barrie, Blountville, TN
BFA in Fine Art
Milk (fabric sculpture, found objects, video, sound and installation)

A multimedia artist with a current focus on video and sculpture, Heather Barrie investigates notions of female sexuality and motherhood as informed by culture and religion in her show Milk.

“My work is informed by the convergence of female sexuality and an ambivalent relationship to Christianity. By using transformational conceptual processes, both physical and spiritual, these artworks begin to juxtapose the female identity of mother and sexual being. By exposing notions of subordination, while simultaneously constructing personal symbols of anti-conformity, I can begin to escape my place within cultural and religious systems.”

Jill Schumann

Jill Schumann

 

 

Jill Schumann
BFA in Photography
Objects to Burn (disposable cameras, digital, and video)

A native of Ohio, Jill Schumann is a multimedia artist specializing in photography. Her work aims to reclaim and repurpose gender, identity, sexuality and various forms of control. “Through consensual collaboration/play, my work negotiates our own hierarchies of power.”

Robin Sinnett

Robin Sinnett

Robin Sinnett
BFA in Fine Art
delta (graphic novel, digitally created pages)

Robin Sinnett’s graphic novel delta is set in an original fantasy world where souls are physical objects, bestowed by one of the world’s three deities, and dictate a person’s traits and identity. This work examines the differences between behaviors and traits that are learned and those that are innate, how culture and society effect both parts of a personality, and ultimately how one’s identity is formed.

The exhibitions and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot. For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615.383.4848.

The Spring 2015 Watkins BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions will conclude in the Currey Gallery May 7–18 with Zack Rafuls, Luisiana Mera, Weng Tze Yang.

The Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery is located in the main academic building on the Watkins campus. Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.

Click to enlarge evite

Click to enlarge evite

Kevin Dietz Draws Swaney Prize 2015

Posted on: March 26th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Fine Art major Kevin Dietz, a sophomore from Memphis, was awarded the 2015 Robb Swaney Prize for Excellence in Visual Expression during judging held on March 12. Established in 2006 by Mary Jane Swaney in memory of her husband, noted Nashville architect Charles Robb Swaney, the $1,000 cash prize honors a student who produced “visual designs and patterns that spoke to others.”

Jurors Martin Shofner of Shofner Buck Architects/Architectsure and Walter Crouch of Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP, former associates of Mr. Swaney, praised Dietz’s charcoal and graphite drawings and woodcut and poly-litho prints; in particular, they cited the power of two charcoal drawings which were based on the mythological figure Silenus. Dietz explained, “[Silenus’] archetype has been transferable through out literature and in popular culture without too much representation to his deeper philosophical manifestation. I wanted to play on the classical representation of this character and experiment with eroding this drawing until he became a series of lines and distortion. I’m fascinated with imagery of history and power and all I want to do is deflate them or find those figures whose potency and story is not that of fame and glory.”

Students were selected by their department chairs to participate in the annual competition, and brought examples of their work to display and discuss.

Congratulations to all the 2015 Swaney Prize nominees!

Fine Art:
Kevin Dietz
Kay Kennedy

Film:
Alex Mattingly

Graphic Design:
Yanet Mireles
Sara Schork

Interior Design
Laurabelle Chytrowsky
Thera Barnes

Photography:
Joe Nunez
Alanna Styer

Alanna  Styer

Alanna Styer

Swaney 2015 Thera Barnes edit

Thera Barnes

 

Laurabelle Chytrowsky

Laurabelle Chytrowsky

Kay Kennedy

 

Kevin Dietz

Kevin Dietz

Yanet Mireles

Yanet Mireles

Sara Schork

Sara Schork

Joe Nunez

Joe Nunez

Alex Mattingly

Alex Mattingly

 

 

 

 

Swaney judging 0042 edit Wweb

WAG Does Time at April 4th Downtown Art Crawl

Posted on: March 13th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film will present “The Video Show,” an exhibition of video work by current Watkins students, at its downtown gallery WAG during the April 4 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl.

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

Click to enlarge evite

Click to enlarge evite

The 18 participating artists are

  • Caleb Adcock
  • Mika Agari
  • Sharyn Bachleda
  • Andrew Cox
  • Meghan Daughdrill
  • Ryan Duncan
  • Lisa Harless
  • Rebecca Lindley
  • Luisiana Mera
  • Upreyl Mitchell
  • Joseph Newsome
  • Carly Piccione
  • Christopher Robertson
  • Joshua Ungurait
  • Alexander Uselton
  • Hayley Vanhoy
  • Glen Vollmer
  • George Wise

“The Video Show” is curated by Assistant Professor of Fine Art Morgan Higby-Flowers, who teaches 4D design and digital imaging and is responsible for developing the curriculum for all Time-Based Media courses. He graduated with an MFA from the Electronic Integrated Arts program, NYSCC at Alfred University (Alfred, NY) and with a BFA from The School of The Art Institute of Chicago, and served as visiting faculty at Austin Peay State University and Ball State University (Muncie, IN) before joining Watkins in 2013. He is a member of COOP and his work—notably, new media projection art with a specific interest in discarded technologies—has been performed and exhibited extensively in Chicago and New York as well as in Mexico City, Barcelona and Cairo.

(photo by Jess Williams for Native)

(photo by Jess Williams for Native)

Check out this recent article about Higby-Flowers in Native|Nashville’s Culture Magazine

Art Crawl logoWAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues.  For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

About WAG
The Watkins Arcade Gallery–WAG–is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG logo Watkins color rsz WwebWAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape. The venue will present shows year-round featuring work by Watkins students, alumni and other professional artists. For inquiries, contact WAG@watkins.edu. WAG is the second Watkins-run gallery space, joining the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, the primary exhibiting space on the College’s campus in Metro Center.

 

BFA Thesis Series Continues with April 9 Reception for Sharyn Bachleda and Sharon Stewart

Posted on: March 11th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film continues Spring 2015 BFA Thesis Exhibitions with a Thursday, April 9 opening by Sharyn Bachleda and Sharon Stewart. After a reception from 5:30 to 8 p.m., the work will remain on display in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery through April 20. Please note: A portion of Sharon Stewart’s work is an installation that will be viewable on opening night only.

This double exhibition is the second in a four-part series from 12 graduating students in the Departments of Fine Art and Photography.

Sharyn Bachleda, self portrait with projection

Sharyn Bachleda, self portrait with projection

Sharyn Bachleda, Knoxville, TN • sbachleda.tumblr.com
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Extracted Relics (photography, video projection installation, film, found objects, collage/assemblage, digital scans)

Read her post on NASHVILLE ARTS

Sharyn Bachleda is a multi-media fine artist, collector and photographer. Bachleda’s work brings awareness to the inconsistencies in the recollection process of memory and challenges its authenticity by constructing and manipulating relationships through photography, video, and object-relations. She uses new media technology as a filter to translate and transcend the footage into space. Bachleda calls attention to real vs. fabricated remembrance by juxtaposing photographs with objects/relics. The work is in dialogue with ideas concerning identity, culture, materiality and the contrast between the physical and mental residue imposed upon the body and mind. It embodies what is absent, preserved, processed and collected in everyday life.

Born in Deerfield Beach, Florida, Bachleda grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee and moved to Nashville in 2012. She has participated in numerous exhibitions throughout Tennessee including the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Knoxville Museum of Art, the Tipton Gallery, the Bijou Theater, Track One and the Bagwell Gallery, and has been featured in two issues of Thorizine. WBIR-TV/Knoxville interviewed her for being the youngest to exhibit in the history of the Dogwood Arts Regional Fine Art Exhibition in 2011, and she has received several merit-based scholarships and awards. Bachleda has worked as a teachers aid at ELC Faith Lutheran Church and aspires to continue educating children and young adults in the arts.

Sharon Stewart • sharondgstewart.com
BFA in Photography
Show title: 
Perpetual Dream Home(video, sound, photography, stop motion, installation)

Sharon Stewart, "In the Middle of the Night in a Dark House Somewhere in the World"

Sharon Stewart, “In the Middle of the Night in a Dark House Somewhere in the World”

Statement: My work depicts the psychology of domestic space, recreating the quiet drama of the slow passage of daily time that unfolds in our most intimate environments through our interactions with ourselves, others, and the spaces, objects and ideas of home.

Born and raised in Williamsburg, Virginia, Sharon Stewart has lived in Nashville since 2007. She works primarily in photography and time-based media. Her personal work, collaborations and curatorial projects have been exhibited at WAG, Carlos Gallery, COOP, OZ and the Tennessee Board of Regents; and they have been featured in Hyperallergic, Nashville Scene, Nashville Arts Magazine blog, The Contributor and on Nashville News Channel 5. She is a two-time nominee for the Robb Swaney Prize for Excellence in Visual Expression and the recipient of multiple merit-based scholarships. She has participated in volunteer work with community organizations that utilize art as a means of self-discovery and healing in areas of mental health and addiction recovery. Through these experiences, and her involvement in art collaborations with death row prisoners (as part of the ongoing Watkins students and faculty collaborations with Unit 2 at Riverbend Maximum Security Institution), she has become passionate about artistic endeavors that challenge society’s perceptions of individuals who are often stigmatized. She hopes to use art, and photography in particular, as a therapeutic treatment tool in her future career as an art therapist.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The exhibitions and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot. For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615.383.4848.

Updates to programming will be posted to Watkins.edu.

The Spring 2015 Watkins BFA Senior Thesis series opens March 16 in the Currey Gallery with the group show Absence by Elizabeth Courtney, Cassey Honeycutt, Kayla Saito and Luke Weir, and will continue April 23–May 4 with Heather Barrie, Jill Schumann and Robin Sinnett and May 7–18 with Zack Rafuls, Luisiana Mera, Weng Tze Yang.

The Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery is located in the main academic building on the Watkins campus. Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Admission and parking are free.

Watkins Kicks Off BFA Thesis Exhibition Series March 26

Posted on: March 11th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

First of four group shows features Elizabeth Courtney, Cassey Honeycutt, Kayla Saito and Luke Weir

 

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents BFA Thesis Exhibitions 2015, a four-part series from 12 graduating students in the Departments of Fine Art and Photography. First up is work from four students–Elizabeth Courtney, Cassey Honeycutt, Kayla Saito and Luke Weir–who have titled their group effort Absence. Opening Thursday, March 26, with a reception from 5:30 to 8 p.m., Absence will be on display in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery through April 6.

Elizabeth Courtney, Cunningham, TN • idealmomentsphotography.com
BFA in Photography
Individual show title: Families Keeping the Past Alive (digital photographs and a book)

Families Keeping the Past Alive is an autobiography of Elizabeth’s life as a Civil War Reenactor and why she continues to reenact 20 years after starting with her family. Throughout her years reenacting, Elizabeth as gained a second family; her reenacting group has seen her grow up, graduate high school, navigate the world and will soon watch her graduate college. This body of work is a depiction of those connections and how her “family” keeps the past alive.
Note: Elizabeth will also present an off-site show, March 27-28, at the Masonic Lodge (corner of 7th and Broadway); opening night reception is 6-8 pm.
Cassey Honeycutt, "Bedroom"

Cassey Honeycutt, “Bedroom”

Cassey Honeycutt, Knoxville, TN • casseyhoneycuttphotography.net
BFA in Photography
Individual show title: Distance (medium-format photography and book)

Cassey Honeycutt is a photographer who focuses on portraiture with a photojournalistic approach. The work in her show Distance focuses on her relationship with her fiancé, Josh Golden, as he decides to join the U.S. Navy. The images follow time passing as Josh prepares to join the Navy, leaves and graduates Boot Camp and trains for an IT job in Pensacola, Florida, while Cassey remains in Nashville.

Kayla Saito, Nashville kaylasaito.com
BFA in Fine Art
Found objects, carpet, audio and video surveillance, monitors, photography

Kayla Saito, still from "Aquarium"

Kayla Saito, still from “Aquarium”

Kayla Saito is a sculptor and printmaker who focuses on installation work. The theme of her senior thesis show is documenting and re-representing intimate behaviors within public spaces, and she incorporates manipulated surveillance-type documentation with manipulated found materials to create a falsified home environment within the gallery. Saito juxtaposes voyeuristic images she’s captured in public with images mined from social media profiles in order to evaluate representation of individual identity within very opposed public spaces.

Luke Weir, Mt. Carmel, ILlukeweir.tumblr.com
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: No Nothing (book, thoughts, and what would be regarded as empty space)

Luke Weir tumblr_ WwebStatement: “We as individuals are fundamentally inseparable from the totality of Existence. The nature of art parallels the interdependence of Existence in that the viewer is as crucial to art’s existence as the artist. One cannot be a viewer without being an artist, for the act of viewing—and the thoughts it evokes—becomes a distinct and creative expression whether or not one chooses to verbalize it or not. In this way, we all have an inherent creative capacity within us, but many of us have long been under the illusion that the artist is a sort of cultural mystic; this perceived cultural role becomes a polarizing structure that often suppresses an individual’s awareness of their own creative capacity. Due to the relatively large number of graduating seniors, I am declining to show any of my work, by doing so I wish to draw attention to the community component of art and the interconnectedness of the creative experience.”

The exhibitions and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot. For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615.383.4848.

Updates to programming will be posted to Watkins.edu.

The Spring 2015 Watkins BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions will continue in the Currey Gallery April 9–20 with Sharyn Bachleda and Sharon Stewart; April 23–May 4 with Heather Barrie, Jill Schumann and Robin Sinnett; and May 7–18 with Zack Rafuls, Luisiana Mera, Weng Tze Yang.

The Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery is located in the main academic building on the Watkins campus. Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Admission and parking are free.

Cassey Honeycutt, "Processing"

Cassey Honeycutt, “Processing”

 

Cassey Honeycutt, "Ceremony"

Cassey Honeycutt, “Ceremony”

 

 

Click to enlarge evite

Click to enlarge evite