Archive for the ‘Fine Art News’ Category

‘Watkins Alumni Exhibition Series No. 1’ Celebrates Community and Connections

Posted on: October 30th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents “Watkins Alumni Exhibition Series No. 1,” featuring new work by 10 alumni in Film, Fine Art, Graphic Design and Photography and opening Thursday, November 20, with a reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus. The exhibition will run through December 12.

Participating artists in “Watkins Alumni Exhibition Series No. 1″ are Jeremy Adams (Film, 2003), Alicia W. Binkley (Graphic Design, 2008), Chris Doubler (Fine Art, 2006), Patricia Earnhardt (Fine Art, 2008),  Jennifer Georgescu (Photography, 2008), Derek Gibson (Fine Art, 2004), Pam Jolly Haile (Fine Art, 2013), Joshua Brent Montgomery (Film, 2008), Jaime Raybin (Fine Art, 2006) and Trent Thibodeaux (Graphic Design, 2006).

This inaugural show, organized by the newly formed Watkins Alumni Committee, is the first in an ongoing series that intends to demonstrate the diverse and continued explorations of art across departments among the alumni community.

The exhibition and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot. For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615.383.4848.

Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. (Watkins will be closed Nov. 27-28 for Thanksgiving.) Admission is free.

About the Artists

Director and cinematographer Jeremy Adams (coroflot.com/jeradams) lives and works in Los Angeles. A 2003 graduate of the Film School at Watkins, he has worked in a variety of roles in film/video production, ranging from art department assistant on ABC’s “Pushing Daises” to storyboarding acclaimed music video director Joseph Kahn’s second feature film, “Detention.” Jeremy has directed and photographed documentaries, commercials, music videos, short films and a feature film. In 2012, he directed an award-winning spot for Marine Corps Special Operations Command/MARSOC and in 2013, shot and edited the webisode “You Ought To Know Nashville” for PBS Digital.

  • Grid of 9 (3 across, 3 down), archival digital prints, iPhone photography (12″x20″)

    JJeremy Adams, "Pacific Stranger"

    Jeremy Adams, “Pacific Stranger”

“I have always viewed the ordinary world in cinematic widescreen. For the longest time I tried to develop a photographic style to reflect this, without any real success, but having an iPhone in my pocket at all times and taking pictures on a phone just for the hell of it has allowed themes of simplicity and space to emerge, one photo after another. My eye is now naturally drawn to unique, natural landscapes that sometimes feature inhabitants. Most times though, the landscapes themselves are characters in their own right that tell a story without ever saying a word. It’s this aspect that attracts me the most, especially in this modern and ever-complicating world where we are constantly bombarded with information.”

Alicia Waters Binkley - him her

Alicia W. Binkley, “Him Her”

Alicia Waters Binkley (adubsyall.com) describes herself as a “designer and doer who loves to find creative ways to help others.” Running her own business since earning her BGA in Graphic Design Watkins in 2008, she currently co-runs MID, a print and design company, with her husband, Drew. On top of illustrating she has a great passion for UX and problem solving — worked with many clients around the world on UX/UI solutions for web and mobile — and enjoys serving as the Creative Director at AlienFast, LLC. Earlier this year she became a host of the Nashville chapter of the monthly global creative networking series CreativeMornings.

  • “Him Her,” 2-color screen print with metallic gold ink printed on #110 Smart White French paper (12″ x 18″). Open editions.

“My work tugs at the heartstrings of sentiment and nostalgia. My illustrations often include pattern work with an update to traditional elements and icons.”

A Middle Tennessee native, Chris Doubler received his BFA in Fine Art from Watkins in 2006. Since that time he has applied his skills and education to become an exhibition designer, preparator, graphic designer and art handler at institutions including Cheekwood Museum & Botanical Gardens, The Frist Center for the Visual Arts, and The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

  • Silkcreen print on paper (approx 16″x19″)
Jennifer Georgescu, "The Veil"

Jennifer Georgescu, “The Veil”

Jennifer Georgescu’s (jengeorgescu.com) work describes instinctual aspects of humanity correlating to and differing from societal structuring. With a background in painting and photographic arts, she utilizes medium format film photography, installation, and digital technology. Her projects analyze dualisms in language, relationships, mythologies and control. “I often search for the balance that exists in between these dichotomies. This is how I view humanity; always teetering on the line between fiction and reality, domination and submissiveness, self and other.”

After obtaining a BFA in Photography from Watkins College of Art, Design & Film in 2008, Georgescu was awarded a yearlong residency at Vanderbilt University’s “Gallery F.” She has received numerous honors from Artist Portfolio Magazine, the Camera Obscura Journal of Literature and Photography, and the Julia Margaret Cameron Award.  Her works have recently been exhibited in the Masur Museum of Art, the Detroit Museum of New Art, the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, and PhotoCenter NW. She lives in San Francisco.

  • “Star Gazers” (the veil) (20”x20,” 2014) and “Star Gazers” (night walks) (15”x15,” 2014)

I wish I could believe that something was out there waiting for me in the cosmos. I find the thought of forever incapacitating. Then I think of the alternative; of being nothing ever again. We all have a self-proclaimed importance that renders our being obsolete, impossible. This is part of what makes us human. We hold the idea of our importance despite our insignificance and mortality.

Jennifer Georgescu, "Night Walks"

Jennifer Georgescu, “Night Walks”

I long for a time, somewhere in the past, when it was thought that all information was just out of reach and all we had to do was find it. I feel that in present time, the more information we know, the more we realize that we’ll never know it all. We now have a vastly expanding wealth of information at our fingertips, yet we are no closer to “knowing” the most important answers.

The most wonderful idea I can think of, the thing that truly comforts me, is the possibility of time being warped beyond our current perception. I find comfort in the idea of parallel universes; where little holes allow for one world to briefly experience the next. When you make a decision in one world, an alternate decision would be made in the next, and so on. This idea has always allowed me to think that when I am gone in one world, I may continue in the next.

“Star Gazers” addresses the things that are hard to think about (i.e. death, mortality, insignificance) through imagination and narrative easy to be confronted with. Fiction and awe weave together antique imagery, scientific imaging, and medium format film photography to tell a far-fetched tale that is factually possible.   This is a story where worlds can communicate, where past and present can connect, and the cosmos contain meaning.

Patricia Earnhardt, film still from "Accepted"

Patricia Earnhardt, film still from “Accepted”

Patricia Earnhardt (patriciaearnhardt.com) is a multimedia visual artist working primarily with video and installation art. Her work, which focuses on social and political issues as well as personal internal struggles, has been exhibited in Berlin, Germany and in numerous venues in Nashville. She graduated from Watkins in 2008 with a BFA in fine Art. She is also a filmmaker and, for the past 20 years, has run Earnhardt Films, LLC with her husband, David Earnhardt.

  • Digital video, “Accepted” (2:36, looping)

“In the video, ‘Accepted,’ soft, ripe fruit falls onto the back of a woman reclining peacefully in a field. The fruit splays as it hits the quiet and unflinching body — flesh meeting flesh. The image depicts an acceptance of nature and its effects on the body over time, showing the beauty in aging — something that is often considered grotesque.”

A Murfreesboro native, Derek Gibson (derekgibson.see.me) has exhibited locally, regionally and nationally in a variety of group and juried shows in Fort Collins (CO), Cincinnati, Atlanta and New York City since graduating from Watkins with a BFA in Fine Art in 2004. His work has included sculpture, photography, installation and video installation. He stays involved in the local art community, volunteering as a studio teaching assistant and exhibit preparator in two local non-profit organizations and maintaining his own artistic practice while keeping a day job.

  • Mixed media sculpture of various domestic and exotic hardwoods (approx. 6-8’ tall, 4-5’ in length and width)

“My work is informed by the idea of place. This could be a physical place where I have been or where I shared an event with a significant other. It could also be a spiritual place I have been as part of my meditation practice and continuing journey of personal development.

Pam Haile - Her Mark 1

Pam Haile, “Her Mark 1″

Pam Jolly Haile processes ideas of space and place using a variety of visual languages, including painting, sculpture, installation and photography. Her focus on nature’s benevolence and the experiences it provides is the thread she follows, weaving abstract ideas and theory into her art practice. She earned her BFA in Fine Art from Watkins in 2013 and currently lives and works in Nashville.

  • Archival UV direct print on dibond substrate (20″x15″)

“There is a seamless rapport between my everyday life and art making. The work I create is a recording of my ordinary experiences. I aim to engage the audience with sensory and poetic qualities in works that question what it means to consciously observe, and therefore wholly experience being human.”

Joshua Brent Montgomery, "Shine"

Joshua Brent Montgomery, “Shine”

Joshua Brent Montgomery (joshuabrentmontgomery.com) is an artist from Goodlettsville, TN. A 2008 graduate of the Film School at Watkins, he works as a casting associate in the entertainment industry and spends his free time writing and drawing.

  • Three acrylic on canvas: “Boy in Snow” (24”x36”), “Scared Boy in Field” (18”x24”), “Shine” (36″x36″)

“My work is culled from a wide variety of personal interests and curiosities, none of which share a locus worth mentioning.”

Alethea Norene holds a BFA in Photography in 2008 from Watkins and MFA in 2010 from Maine College of Art in Portland. She has exhibited her work nationally in solo and group exhibitions and alternative venues such as clothing boutiques. Co-founder of SOUP, a community based micro-grant program for artists in Portland, Alethea is currently expanding her creative practice and is in school in Nashville to become a Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner, hoping to utilize her creative experiences to positively empower women.

  • Archival pigment print from digital scan of film (30×30″)

“My work celebrates friendship, co-dependence, magic, healing, faith, and mistake making. My images and drawings memorialize moments of togetherness and independent voyages.”

Jaime Raybin, "For Owen"

Jaime Raybin, “For Owen”

Jaime Raybin (jaimeraybin.com) earned a BFA in Fine Art in 2006 from Watkins, where she currently works as an admissions recruiter. Her exhibition history includes Northwestern University, the Frist Center for the Visual Arts (Nashville), Swanson-Reed Contemporary (Louisville, KY), the Foundry Art Centre (Saint Charles, MO), Athens Institute for Contemporary Art (Athens, GA), the Renaissance Center (Dickson, TN) and the University of the South (Sewanee, TN).

  • Acrylic on canvas “Bathroom” (28″x37″) and “Can Phone” (17″x42″); digital micrography collage “For Owen” and “For Kalina” (each approx. 18”x24″)

“My paintings deal with themes of social isolation and escapism. They are set in the workplace and in shared living spaces. This work is figurative and personal, often featuring myself as a character in narrative metaphorical vignettes.”

Originally from Louisiana, Trent Thibodeaux (thedesign13.com) has been a resident of Nashville for the past 14 years, since coming to Watkins to study graphic design; he earned his BFA in 2006. He has worked in many facets of the design world and currently is lead designer at Third Man Records.

  • Graphite and wall paper on paper (10×20); color photo (8×10), wall pasted illustration in corner (3’x4’)

“My work deals with the transformation from the familiar to the unfamiliar. Using drawings, textures, & found images that evoke nostalgia, i create new images that tell an unintended story. At first glance these new images look familiar and deliver a sense of comfort. Through further exploration, the comparison of unfamiliar and unexpected elements creates sense of uneasiness. The conflict created by the unexpected change in narrative, caused by the combination of disparate elements challenges the viewer to rethink the idea of normalcy and expectation.”

Click to enlarge evite

Click to enlarge evite

About the Watkins Alumni Committee

The Watkins Alumni Committee preserves the spirit of the Watkins community for alumni, locally and nationally, beyond graduation by cultivating opportunities for professional growth and support as well as social connectivity. As artists and makers, we promote the value of the arts beyond the walls of Watkins through collaborations with community organizations and local businesses, advocating for arts access and art education, and developing a culture of philanthropy in the arts. For more information, contact committee chair Abby Whisenant at [email protected]

WAG Catches David Anderson’s ‘Desire Trap/pings’ for November Art Crawl

Posted on: October 16th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents Desire Trap/pings, a multiple media installation by Fine Art junior David Anderson at its downtown gallery WAG during the November 1 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl.

Desire Trap/pings will feature oil paintings, sculptures, found objects, and modified found objects, and each piece is considered as a different scene or trap that suspends a desire, one that could be transformed into something new.

David Anderson Loose Gate

“Loose Gate,” 2014 (57″x65″ oil on canvas)

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

WAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues.  For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

Statement:
Hybrid forms and processes locate desire between the cool, fetishized ironies of glam culture and sincere ritual; between consumer aesthetic and human touch; between cereal box and retablo (altarpiece). Desire Trap/pings combines hyper color, invented graphic forms, and grungy, tactile, shimmering surfaces to suggest a space analogous to a near future church of Philip K. Dick’s (and David Anderson’s) imagination.

"Bleeding," 2014 (oil, silk screen, appropriation)

“Bleeding,” 2014

Anderson, a Nashville native, has previously exhibited at WAG in Abstraction’s Imaginative Fictions (November 2013), the printmaking show Staying the Course (February 2014), and Co. H collective’s Play (May 2014). He was also part of the summer group shows Bruised Anvil (at the Packing Plant) and Co. H’s Mystic Truths (Watkins’ Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery), named by the Nashville Scene “Best Student Show” in their recent Best of Nashville issue.

To see more of his David Anderson’s work, visit davidonri.tumblr.com

About WAG
The Watkins Arcade Gallery–WAG–is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape. The venue will present shows year-round featuring work by Watkins students, alumni and other professional artists. For inquiries, contact [email protected]. WAG is the second Watkins-run gallery space, joining the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, the primary exhibiting space on the College’s campus in Metro Center.

Scene’s ‘Best of Nashville’ Praises Watkins students, alumni and faculty

Posted on: October 10th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

We appreciate the attention that the Nashville Scene shows to the city’s arts and culture community all year long and their support of Watkins’ talents, events and programming. And we’re grateful for the “Writers’ Choice” recognition of several Watkins students, alumni and faculty in their annual Best Of Nashville issue!

Best Student Show: Co. H’s Mystic Truths at Watkins

Art exhibits by college students tend to be spotty affairs. But the Mystic Truths show at Watkins was a thoroughly excellent display and the crowning achievement to a busy year for the Co. H collective, whose multiple exhibitions in multiple venues all over the city this year recalled the glory days of the Secret Shows founded by Watkins students. We need young, hardworking artists to energize and challenge our scene, and these kids are all right. –Joe Nolan

Best Art Collaboration: Watkins and Death Row Unit 2NvScene Bestof2014 arts_culture image Wweb

A series of art installations at Watkins Arcade Gallery created by students from the school in collaboration with death row prisoners at Riverbend Maximum Security Institution, the latest Unit 2 exhibition opened in July. Social practice art is all the rage, but when the privileged decide to create with the disenfranchised, exploitation is often the result. Not so here. This heartbreaking wonder of a series exemplifies that one-word answer to this question: “How might artists best ply their trade in the name of social progress?” Service. – Joe Nolan

Anne Catherine Carter

Anne Catherine Carter (photo by Michael W. Bunch)

Best New Curator: Ann Catherine Carter at the Packing Plant

Whip-smart and talented, Ann Catherine Carter was a regular fixture at art events when she was a Watkins student, and after taking over from Veronica Kavass as The Packing Plant’s curator, she’s positioned to prove herself as a conduit between Nashville’s old guard and its new. — Laura Hutson

Best Abstract Art Show: Abstractometry at the Frist [featuring Watkins Fine Art Professor Terry Thacker]

Abstractometry graced the Frist’s Conte Community Arts space with a display that functioned as a survey of some of Nashville’s best abstract artists while simultaneously examining the manner in which our city defines itself through album art, letterpress printing, vintage signs and other graphic means. Terry Thacker, James Perrin and Alex Blau all showed stand-out work in the exhibition, setting a high bar for nonfigurative art that wasn’t surpassed in Nashville in 2014. – Joe Nolan

PatrickDeGuira_HueandWeight

Patrick DeGuira, “Hue and Weight”

Best Solo Show: [Fine Art Adjunct Faculty] Patrick DeGuira at Zeitgeist 

Patrick DeGuira has become one of Nashville’s best artists by bringing his meticulous craftsmanship to a broad understanding of the current contemporary art conversation and marrying both to his own personal mythology. DeGuira’s Shade Models at Zeitgeist included photography, models, paintings and even a full-sized rowboat. The show opened last fall after our 2013 Best of Nashville issue, but it still resonates. – Joe Nolan

Best New Gallery: David Lusk Gallery Nashville [featuring Watkins Fine Art Adjunct Faculty Mary Addison Hackett]

David Lusk is a skilled art dealer with a proven record of connecting artwork with buyers, and news that he was opening a Nashville outpost of his successful Memphis gallery was met with almost immediate praise. The gallery’s opening exhibition, which featured work from local favorites like Mary Addison Hackett and Kit Reuther, all but solidified its Wedgewood-Houston locale as the most interesting part of the First Saturday art openings. – Laura Hutson

plus

Best Art Programing: Seed Space
Watkins Fine Art student Kayla Saito works at Seed Space

A nonprofit contemporary art laboratory is an ideal space for experimentation, and Seed Space brings that mindset into public talks and some of the most exciting programming in town. An example of their innovative programming is the recent monthlong visit from New York gallerist Andrea Zieher, who hosted workshops and portfolio reviews for Nashville-based artists hungry for national exposure. – Laura Hutson

 

Best Arty Hang: Nashville Artists Drinking Beer (Coop Gallery)
Coop Gallery features Watkins faculty Kristi Hargrove, Terry Thacker, Morgan Higby-Flowers and Tom Williams

This sporadic event with a deceptively blunt title is actually a fairly focused addition to Nashville’s teeming storytelling gatherings (Research Club, That Time of the Month, Pictures of Fireworks) that sets itself apart by name-checking booze, so you know what kind of party it’s going to be. Led by the Coop Gallery cooperative and hosted at Craft Brewed, NADB is frequented by some of the most interesting artists in town, who show off their knowledge of everything from bearded ladies to karaoke in short, three-minute presentations. This is irreverent, arty fun at its beer-soaked best. – Laura Hutson

and

The Readers’ Poll named First Saturday Art Crawl as Best Art Happening — WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery) just celebrated its first anniversary as part of the monthly event!

WAG Celebrates First Anniversary with September 6 ‘Iconophilia’ Show

Posted on: August 27th, 2014 by Caroline Davis
Kevin Dietz color 1 Wweb

Kevin Dietz, “Fetch” (woodcut)

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film marks the first anniversary of its downtown gallery WAG during the September 6 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl with Iconophilia, featuring summer studio work in multiple media from Fine Art majors Heather Barrie, Kevin Dietz and Ashley Doggett.

The show include prints, woodcuts, etchings, photography, sculpture and mixed media that reflect an interest in symbols and iconographic imagery. All three artists create work that challenges aspects of the human norm, from fixations with the modern to the superimposed need by society to implore fetishism over distinctive, manipulative imagery – the iconophilia.

WAG’s inaugural season has presented work by students and alumni in painting, installation, sculpture, printmaking, photography, illustration, film/video, plus an original curatorial exhibition. Of the 11 shows (one ran December/January), six have been group efforts, two duo, and three solo.

“The first year of WAG has been a rousing success,” said Fine Art assistant professor Brady Haston, “because of our students’ commitment to presenting thoughtful, focused exhibitions that show real insight into contemporary art trends. The diversity of their work and its high quality have raised the profile of young artists in Nashville’s cultural scene and led to several additional creative opportunities for them.”

HeatherBarrie ClenchPrintWhite Wweb

Heather Barrie, ‘Clench’ [print]

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

WAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues. For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

About WAG
The Watkins Arcade Gallery–WAG–is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape. The venue will present shows year-round featuring work by Watkins students, alumni and other professional artists. For inquiries, contact WAG@watkins.ed[email protected]. WAG is the second Watkins-run gallery space, joining the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, the primary exhibiting space on the College’s campus in Metro Center.

Kevin Dietz b&w Wweb

Kevin Dietz, “The Secret Handshake” (woodcut)

Kevin Dietz: The work that I’ve created closely relates to the graphic narrative, metaphor, and reinterpreting the everyday through traditional methods of print and mark making. I draw a similar line through history as Ashley and Heather from religious medieval prints such as the Nuremberg Chronicles, but I also reference romantic symbolism, Guston, and underground comics from the 60’s and 80’s. The images harbor reflections from the immediacy of everyday: from the job market, academia, and the ever present tension between our social state of affairs.

Ashley Doggett 2

Ashley Doggett

Ashley Doggett: This current oeuvre has its preoccupations with the graphic narrative found in a world engrossed in modernity, racial identity, sexuality, and profound interpretations of history that challenge the audience to consider the extreme harshness of what has been accomplished in the modern American world, both past and present.

All three artists are offering the regalia of the iconic by creating the ultimate iconoclasm; by bringing forth their controversial ideals on the higher spheres of social, political, and religious institutions, they are in fact making commentary on cultural fetishism, the preoccupation of unveiling the obscure to a general audience, and challenging the social tension between race and religion.

HeatherBarrie_MyTribe

Heather Barrie, “My Tribe”

 

Ashley Doggett 1 Wweb

Ashley Doggett

 

Iconophilia Sept2014 WAG evite f

Watkins Collects “Monuments, Hotel Soap and Linear Progressions”

Posted on: August 27th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Opening reception for faculty show is September 4 in Currey Gallery

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents “Monuments, Hotel Soap and Linear Progressions,” a multiple media exhibition featuring recent work by faculty artists Mary Addison Hackett, Ariel Lavery, Robin Paris and Tom Williams, from September 4–26 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

MAHackett_Hotel Soap 50x39in

Mary Addison Hackett, “Hotel Soap” (50″ x 39″), 2014, oil on canvas

The exhibition’s opening reception, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, September 4, is free and open to the public.

An adjunct instructor in Watkins’ Department of Fine Art, Mary Addison Hackett is a painter who has recently returned to the South after an extended leave of absence. The paintings for this show are the result of fieldwork and were painted from direct observation of objects in-situ around her childhood home (which is also her current studio) as well as a recent camping trip. Progressing through the seasons they capture the nuances of day-to-day life as revealed in domestic, work and leisure spaces.

ArielLavery wall silver 2layers

Ariel Lavery, “As We Continue to Move Forward,” 2012, found objects and mixed media

 

 

 

 

Ariel Lavery, who joined the Watkins Fine Art department this semester as Assistant Professor of Sculpture, is exhibiting two sculptures that install together: “As We Continue to Move Forward” (found objects and mixed media) and “Linear Progression of Chest, Wall Shelf, Shoe Organizer, Broiler Pan, and Napkin Rings.” Lavery’s assembled sculptures and installations reflect on a concept of Middle America as it is defined in domestic goods. She borrows from American domestic vernacular to create mutated versions of home living spaces, “sampling” from her immediate surroundings as she collects detritus found in thrift stores, at garage sales, on Craigslist, and on the side of the road.

Robin Paris Tom Williams Lincoln 2

Robin Paris and Tom Williams, Statue of Abraham Lincoln by Adolph Alexander Weinman, Hodgenville, KY (installed 1909), 2014, archival pigment print

Associate Professor of Photography Robin Paris, in collaboration with Assistant Professor of Art History Tom Williams, will show photographic abstractions of figurative monuments made throughout the South and elsewhere. Paris and Williams set aside the lessons of “good” photography to transform the subjects into shadowy, indeterminate figures. These photographs obliterate the likenesses and context of these statues, but simultaneously emphasize their strident poses and emphatic gestures. In this way, they draw focus away from individual monuments and towards the generalized rhetoric of political monumentality, addressing the subtle persuasions of sculptures that often seem little more than props in the mise-en-scène of everyday life.

Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 1 to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.  Free parking is available in the campus lot.

About Mary Addison Hackett
Born and raised in the South, Hackett migrated to Los Angeles via Chicago, and has been exhibiting in commercial, non-profit and university galleries in the United States and abroad since the early 90’s. She holds an MFA in Studio Art from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a BFA in Painting from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her work alludes to the ever-shifting construction of meaning, memory and representation in day-to-day life. In her current work, Hackett hones her focus on a sense of place by engaging primarily in the practice of observational painting while still acknowledging her roots in abstraction. Recent exhibitions include Tinney Contemporary and Leu Gallery at Belmont University (Nashville); ACME and WEEKEND (Los Angeles); Torrance Art Museum (Torrance, CA); and John Davis Gallery (Hudson, NY). Her debut solo exhibition at Kristi Engle Gallery (2008) in Los Angeles was reviewed by the Los Angeles Times, and she has been featured in numerous other publications. She is represented by David Lusk Gallery; her first solo with the Nashville gallery opens October 1, 2014.

About Ariel Lavery 
Ariel Lavery graduated magna cum laude with her BFA from the University of Colorado Boulder (2007) and received her MFA from the University of Massachusetts Amherst (2013). She has exhibited nationally in Colorado, Kentucky, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, Texas, Tennessee, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Recent solo exhibitions include Project 1 at Zephyr Gallery in Louisville, KY and Detritus In Situ at the Herter Gallery, University of Massachusetts Amherst. Recent group exhibitions include Fresh at the AVA Gallery (Chattanooga, TN), Best of the Northeast at the Helen Day Art Center (Stowe, VT), and Ice Breaker 5 at the Ice Cube Gallery (Denver). She is also a recent recipient of the Artist Enrichment Grant from the Kentucky Foundation for Women.

Robin Paris Tom Williams coach

Robin Paris and Tom Williams, Statue of Coach E.A. Diddle by Russ Faxon, Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, (installed 2005), 2014, archival pigment print

About Robin Paris
Currently chair of the Photography department at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film, Robin Paris earned a BA in Studio Art from the Evergreen State College (Olympia, WA) and studied visual anthropology and creative writing before earning her MFA in photography from Savannah College of Art and Design. She spent a year as a resident artist at Anderson Ranch in Aspen, where she assisted such artists as Keith Smith and Jerry Uelsmann. She has worked in marketing and as a photo editor for small publishing companies in Georgia and Colorado. She currently works in historical processes, digital imaging and book works, and exhibits them nationally.

About Tom Williams
Tom Williams, assistant professor of art history at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film, is a graduate of the University of West Florida (BA, Art History), the State University of New York, Stony Brook (MA and PhD, Art History) and of the Whitney Independent Study Program. He has also taught at the School of the Visual Arts, New York; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Vanderbilt University, and his writings have appeared in Art in America, Grey Room and other publications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Co. H Celebrates ‘Mystic Truths’ with July 12 Reception

Posted on: June 30th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Mystic Truths, a multi-media exhibition from Watkins College of Art, Design & Film’s student-led collective Co. H, will celebrate its summer run with a reception on Saturday, July 12, from 6 to 9 p.m. Featuring outstanding work in painting, printmaking, sculpture, drawing, photography, video and installation from 15 area artists, the show remains on view through July 18 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

The reception and exhibition are free and open to the public.

Participating artists are:mystic truths 6 Wweb

  • Caleb Adcock, Fine Art, senior (digital prints)
  • Mika Agari, Fine Art, senior (video)
  • David Anderson, Fine Art, junior (painting)
  • Heather Barrie, Fine Art, senior (printmaking)
  • Kevin Dietz, Fine Art, sophomore (printmaking)
  • Elisha Farahmand, Fine Art, junior (video)
  • Michael Hampton, BFA in Fine Art ‘14 (video)
  • Aaron Harper, Fine Art, senior (drawing)
  • Blake Holland, Film, senior (photography)
  • Casey Payne, Fine Art, junior (painting)
  • Zack Rafuls, Fine Art, senior (sculpture)
  • Alexine Rioux, BFA in Fine Art, ’14 (printmaking)
  • Kayla Saito, Fine Art, senior (sculpture)
  • Luke Weir, Fine Art, junior (conceptual/installation)
  • Weng Tze Yang, photography, senior (photographic installation)

 

mystic truths1 Wweb“Mystic Truths: A Group Show from Co. H and Friends” collects work from Co. H council members, collaborators and studio mates in order to present a survey of some of the best Watkins-created work. Showcasing current students and recent graduates, “Mystic Truths” includes work across many disciplines, including drawing, painting, sculpture, video, photography, installation and printmaking. The title of the show is pulled from Bruce Nauman’s 1967 neon sign piece “The True Artist Helps The World By Revealing Mystic Truths,” referencing the function of the artist in ironic and hopeful lights simultaneously while also directly supplanting the work within a contemporary context and dialogue.

Currey Gallery’s summer hours are Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.  Free parking is available in the campus lot.

About Co. Hmystic truths2 Wweb
A collective of artists from various disciplines of the visual arts, Co. H provides opportunities for both students and professionals pursuing and/or working in the arts. Founded at Watkins in 2011, Co. H activity includes hosting lecture by artists and art professionals, holding studio critiques and collaborating on multi-disciplinary performances within the community. Visit http://companyh.tumblr.com

About Bruce Nauman
From PBS.org/art21:
Born in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Bruce Nauman has been recognized since the early 1970s as one of the most innovative and provocative of America’s contemporary artists. Nauman finds inspiration in the activities, speech, and materials of everyday life. He graduated with a BFA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1964, and with an MFA from the University of California, Davis, in 1966. Confronted with the question “What to do?” in his studio soon after leaving school, Nauman had the simple but profound realization that “If I was an artist and I was in the studio, then whatever I was doing in the studio must be art. At this point art became more of an activity and less of a product.” Working in the diverse mediums of sculpture, video, film, printmaking, performance, and installation, Nauman concentrates less on the development of a characteristic style and more on the way in which a process or activity can transform or become a work of art. A survey of his diverse output demonstrates the alternately political, prosaic, spiritual, and crass methods by which Nauman examines life in all its gory details, mapping the human arc between life and death. The text from an early neon work proclaims: “The true artist helps the world by revealing mystic truths.” Whether or not we—or even Nauman—agree with this statement, the underlying subtext of the piece emphasizes the way in which the audience, artist, and culture at large are involved in the resonance a work of art will ultimately have. Nauman lives in New Mexico.

Bruce Nauman True Artist sign Bruce Nauman, “The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing Mystic Truths,” neon and clear glass tubing suspension supports; 59 x 55 x 2 inches, 1967(Philadelphia Museum of Art)

From smarthistory.khanacademy.org
Bruce Nauman’s neon sign asks a multitude of questions with regard to the 
ways in which the 20th century conceived both avant-garde art and the role of the 
artist in society. If earlier European modernists, such as Mondrian, 
Malevich, and Kandinsky, sought to use art 
to reveal deep-seated truths about the human condition and the role of the artist 
in general, then Bruce Nauman’s “The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing 
Mystic Truths” questions such transhistorical and universal 
statements. With regard to this work, Nauman said:

The most difficult thing about the whole piece for me was the statement. It 
was a kind of test—like when you say something out loud to see if you 
believe it. Once written down, I could see that the statement [...] was on 
the one hand a totally silly idea and yet, on the other hand, I believed it. 
It’s true and not true at the same time. It depends on how you interpret it 
and how seriously you take yourself. For me it’s still a very strong thought.

‘Communion of Selves’ Concludes Spring BFA Thesis Shows

Posted on: May 6th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film offers work from Samantha Carlson, Amy Clutter and Michele Graham in the mixed media show Communion of Selves, opening Thursday, May 8 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, with a reception from 6 to 8:30 p.m. This fifth and final installment in the BFA Thesis Exhibition Series from the Watkins Fine Art and Photography departments will be on view through May 18.

Carlson, a candidate for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Photography, presents her individually titled show The Psychic Intercourse of Social Reality, with works of photography, video, and printmaking that explore the human imperative for connection and how it is affected by and reflected in the modern world.

Clutter, a BFA in Fine Art degree candidate with an interest in film production design, stages Extractions of Faraway Nearby, a mixed media show investigating psychological spaces.

Fine Art major Graham incorporates painting, text-based art and folded paper forms into Sixty Four Thousand Five Hundred and Twelve, an investigation of habitual behavior through process, repetition and futility, with focus on the action of the artist and duration.

The group exhibition Communion of Selves and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot. For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615.383.4848.

Group show: Communion of Selves

Statement:  The group show title comes from a conceptual thread that runs through all of our work:  the theme of self. In contemporary art, the use of the self as subject matter is oftentimes considered taboo or self-indulgent; however, through this exhibit we assert that while the self refers to individual experience, it also has the capacity to encompass much larger discourse. Our work contends that the self is the most universal.

Samantha Carlson, Atlanta, GA
BFA in Photography
Show title: The Psychic Intercourse of Social Reality (performance, photography, video and printmaking)

Samantha Carlson sweater

Samantha Carlson, Untitled (sweaters, acupuncture needles)

Born in Chicago, Samantha Carlson grew up in Atlanta and has lived in Nashville since 2009. A photographer who specializes in performance, video, and printmaking, she is also involved in curatorial practices. She has exhibited in both Atlanta and Nashville (WAG, Chestnut Square Building, Cummins Station, Little Hamilton Collective, among others). She received Honorable Mention at the 2013 Currey Juried Student Show at Watkins, and a Photography Department Merit Scholarship.

Statement: This body of work explores the function of art as a form of language within the whole enterprise of human connection. The work contemplates issues of social relations made subjective and affected by different forms of communication, culture, the brain, psychology, and sociology. The work also addresses the human imperative for connection and networks through the development of different modes of language and the process of discovering of self-identity and how it is affected by and reflected in the modern world. By focusing on the abjection of the body, the work not only manifests my own subjective experience of interpersonal relations, but also acknowledges the lesser discussed painful, invasive, and abstract facets of connection and disconnection. Each piece is a manifestation of the psychic intercourse of my own social reality.

 

Amy Clutter untitled

Amy Clutter, Untitled (steel sheet, graphite, mylar)

Amy Clutter, East Liverpool, OH
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Extractions of Faraway Nearby (sculpture, installation, drawing, sound)

A native of East Liverpool, in eastern Ohio near the Pennsylvania and West Virginia borders, Amy Clutter moved to Nashville in 2009.  Her drawing “In Between” took  honorable mention in the 2013 Currey Juried Student Show. Her work in production design includes Candi Carpenter’s music video “You And Tom Petty” and the short film “Abilene” by alumna Justine Feldt (’13).  She was assistant in the art department on Dolly Parton’s music video “Home,” to be released this May.

Statement: This body of work investigates the psychological spaces that are created and perceived in our minds, and how the architecture of these psychic spaces shift when situated within the architecture of preexisting sites.

Michele Graham untitled

Michele Graham, Untitled (drywall, paint, standard staples)

Michele Graham, Madison, AL
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Sixty Four Thousand Five Hundred and Twelve (painting, text-based art, and paper folding)

Born in Huntsville, Alabama, Michele Graham been attached to an artistic lifestyle since early childhood on. She began primarily as a portrait painter, moving into more abstract ways of working in college career. She has experimented with a variety of art practices and styles over the years, from standard painting to folded paper.

Statement: This body of work investigates habitual behavior through process, repetition, and futility, setting it up as practice of dedication to a singular thing. In this mode the aesthetic outcome of the work is less significant, and more focused on the action of the artist and duration.

The five-part Spring 2014 Watkins BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions series includes Michael Taylor Cribbs, Michael Hampton and Sarah McDonald, March 27–April 6; Crystal Petrina and Alexine Rioux, April 10–20; Ray Palumbo and Chelsea Wright, April 18 (off-campus at Fort Houston); and Christopher Creasy, Jordan Martin and Hannah Taylor, April 24–May 4.

Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Admission and parking are free.

Carlson Clutter Graham BFA evite

Click image to enlarge evite

 

Christopher Creasy, Jordan Martin and Hannah Taylor Team Up for April 24 BFA Show

Posted on: April 20th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film offers a triple exhibition with work from Christopher Creasy, Jordan Martin and Hannah Taylor, opening Thursday, April 24 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, with a reception from 6 to 8:30 p.m. This fourth installment in the BFA Thesis Exhibitions Series from the Watkins Fine Art and Photography departments will be on view through May 4.

Creasy, a candidate for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Photography, presents Don’t Touch the Remote, with works of video art and sculpture exploring family dynamics and media addiction.

Jordan Martin, Movement of the City

Jordan Martin, “Movement of the City”

 

Martin, a BFA in Fine Art degree candidate, stages Gathered Movements, a series of works that investigates patterns and structures in nature through the use of drawings, etchings and sound.

 

 

 

HannahTaylor sitting painting

Hannah Taylor (sitting painting)

 

 

A painter who also works in mixed media work and sculpture, Fine Art major Taylor stages ALL THE MEAT IS TURKEY BUT MY THESIS EXHIBITION TITLE IS CHEW ON A STICK. Interested in perception of space and ideas of constructed versus found, she creates compositions that relate to architectural space and that have relationships to the body.

The exhibitions and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot.  For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615.383.4848.

Christopher Creasy, Olive Branch, MS
BFA in Photography
Show title: Don’t Touch the Remote (video art, sculpture)

Christopher Creasy grew up outside of Memphis in Olive Branch, MS, where he discovered the curiosities of photography. When photographing he strives to create a narrative within his images, whether in documentary, commercial or fine art fields. He has worked in reportage and portraiture photography and recently began experimenting with mixed media sculptures and video art to address themes of family and media, particularly the idea of replacing ideals of family with fictional character from TV and movies.

Before transferring to Watkins, he attended Northwest Mississippi Community College, where he won “Best News Spot Photograph” in the MPA’s Better Newspaper Contest’s student division.

Jordan Martin, Plate Walk

Jordan Martin, “Plate Walk”

 

Jordan Martin, Nashville
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Gathered Movements (graphite, charcoal, ink, wood, copper etchings, sound recordings, process art)

An artist who specializes in drawing and printmaking, Jordan Martin reveals patterns and structures in nature through process art and sound, investigating mark-making as the product of an idea that has been put into action.

Hannah Taylor, Vancouver, WA • hannahelainetaylor.com
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: ALL THE MEAT IS TURKEY BUT MY THESIS EXHIBITION TITLE IS CHEW ON A STICK (painting, sculpture, video)

HannahTaylor image from installation

Hannah Taylor (image from installation)

Hannah Taylor works primarily as a painter, which often extends to mixed media work and sculpture. Interested in perception of space and ideas of constructed versus found, her work subjectifies physical space through an investigation of forms both fabricated and gestural. Experimenting with unconventional mark making and playful interaction with objects, she creates compositions that relate to architectural space and that have relationships to the body.

In her thesis work, Taylor navigates patterns and reactions in personal and public environments. By focusing on the physical and sensational aesthetic of objects, marks and space, she constructs poetic narratives via conditions of indexicality to provoke feelings of fear, longing, detachment, and familiarity in the viewer.

She has participated in exhibitions in Nashville at Ground Floor Gallery (Girls! Girls! Girls! and It’s Hot in a Dog’s Head), ZieherSmith pop-up at ICON Nashville (Backstock), Cummins Station, the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery and WAG.

Watkins BFA Thesis April 24_May 4 evite

Click on evite to enlarge image

The rest of the five-part Spring 2014 Watkins BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions series includes Michael Taylor Cribbs, Michael Hampton and Sarah McDonald, March 27–April 6; Crystal Petrina and Alexine Rioux, April 10–20; Ray Palumbo and Chelsea Wright, April 18 (off-campus at Fort Houston); and Amy Clutter, Samantha Carlson and Michelle Graham, May 8–18.

 

Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Admission and parking are free.

Swaney Prize Shines on Film School’s Christin Sites

Posted on: April 4th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Christin Sites, a Film School senior from Hendersonville, was awarded the 2014 Robb Swaney Prize for Excellence in Visual Expression during judging held on March 27. Established in 2006 by Mary Jane Swaney in memory of her husband, noted Nashville architect Charles Robb Swaney, the $1,000 cash prize honors a student who produced “visual designs and patterns that spoke to others.”

Swaney 2014 win group

Walter Crouch, Christin Sites, Martin Shofner, Sharon Hels

Jurors Martin Shofner of Shofner Buck Architects/Architectsure and Walter Crouch of Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP, former associates of Mr. Swaney, and Watkins alumna Sharon Hels praised the cinematography and editing major for the technical excellence, composition and visual impact of the three-minute showcase reel.  Christin is the first Film School student to receive the honor.

Each department chair nominated two students to participate in the annual competition, and the artists brought examples of their work to display and discuss.

 

Congratulations to all the 2014 Swaney Prize nominees!

Erin Lord

Erin Lord, Art

 

Emily Stout

Emily Stout, Art

Jeremy Bolden and Christin Sites

Jeremy Bolden and Christin Sites, The Film School

 

Alexine Rioux, Fine Art

Swaney 2014 judging

Martin Shofner discusses work by Fine Art’s Alexine Rioux

Kayla Saito

Kayla Saito, Fine Art

 

Xavier Payne

Xavier Payne, Graphic Design

Katelyn Pennington

Katelyn Pennington, Graphic Design

 

Amhad Freeman

Amhad Freeman, Interior Design

Whitney Garnier, Interior Design

 

Sharon Stewart

Sharon Stewart, Photography

Chelsea Wright

Chelsea Wright, Photography

 

Swaney 2014 MShofner XPayne

Martin Shofner with Graphic Design’s Xavier Payne

photos by Sam Angel

Zack Rafuls Brings the Heat to WAG’s May 3 Show

Posted on: April 2nd, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents HELL IS HOT, an exhibition of new work by Fine Art junior Zack Rafuls, at its downtown gallery WAG during the May 3 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl.

Hell Is Hot Zack Rafuls HELL IS HOT, featuring sculpture, painting and printmaking, examines the schematization of individuals’ direct and indirect relationships to one another and to society at large, through the use of metaphorical objects, symbols, and signifiers.

“As individuals in the modern world, we are constantly in contact with societal and cultural systems that dictate and facilitate our day-to-day experiences,” said Rafuls. “These systems exist, as French philosopher Michel Foucault has theorized, as cultural institutions. The work presented in HELL IS HOT serves to analyze the manner in which such systems – specifically sexuality, technology, and consumer culture – engage with each other, while regulating and shaping our individual and collective psyche and behavior.”

WAG – an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery – is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

WAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues. For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit www.nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl

About Zack Rafuls

Zack Rafuls, Homer

“Homer” (acrylic, gesso, and enamel on wood panel)

A native of Miami, Florida, Zack Rafuls moved to Tennessee in his early teens, and to Nashville in 2011.  His work – primarily sculpture, installation, painting, printmaking and video – has been exhibited at Ground Floor Gallery, the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery at Watkins, Track One and Cummins Station. He is currently the chair of the art collective Co. H, a group of artists from various disciplines, and active in OOMFF, Co. H’s series of experimental happenings.  Co. H  recently exhibited their council show Seven Types of Play at WAG, self-published the second issue of their zine SPIT, and are currently planning a juried showcase of regional video art. Rafuls is an intern at Zeitgeist Gallery and works as a studio assistant in town. When he’s not making things, he’s making noise with his band Onri.

For more information, visit zackrafuls.tumblr.com

 

About WAG
WAG logo orange
The Watkins Arcade Gallery – WAG – is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape. The venue will present shows year-round featuring work by Watkins students, alumni and other professional artists. For inquiries, contact [email protected] WAG is the second Watkins-run gallery space, joining the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, the primary exhibiting space on the College’s campus in Metro Center.

Zack Rafuls Olive Oyl

“Olive Oyl” (fake flowers, aluminum hardware, and painted wood)

About Michel Foucault
French philosopher, historian, theorist and critic Michel Foucault (1926–1984) addressed the relationship between power and knowledge and how they are used as a form of social control through societal institutions. Among his most influential publications are The History of Madness (published as Folie et Déraison: Histoire de la folie à l’âge classique, 1961), The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception (1963), The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences (1966), and Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (1975).

More info at www.michel-foucault.com.

 

WAG May 3 2014 evite

Click on image to enlarge evite