Archive for the ‘Fine Art News’ Category

WAG Celebrates First Anniversary with September 6 ‘Iconophilia’ Show

Posted on: August 27th, 2014 by Caroline Davis
Kevin Dietz color 1 Wweb

Kevin Dietz, “Fetch” (woodcut)

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film marks the first anniversary of its downtown gallery WAG during the September 6 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl with Iconophilia, featuring summer studio work in multiple media from Fine Art majors Heather Barrie, Kevin Dietz and Ashley Doggett.

The show include prints, woodcuts, etchings, photography, sculpture and mixed media that reflect an interest in symbols and iconographic imagery. All three artists create work that challenges aspects of the human norm, from fixations with the modern to the superimposed need by society to implore fetishism over distinctive, manipulative imagery – the iconophilia.

WAG’s inaugural season has presented work by students and alumni in painting, installation, sculpture, printmaking, photography, illustration, film/video, plus an original curatorial exhibition. Of the 11 shows (one ran December/January), six have been group efforts, two duo, and three solo.

“The first year of WAG has been a rousing success,” said Fine Art assistant professor Brady Haston, “because of our students’ commitment to presenting thoughtful, focused exhibitions that show real insight into contemporary art trends. The diversity of their work and its high quality have raised the profile of young artists in Nashville’s cultural scene and led to several additional creative opportunities for them.”

HeatherBarrie ClenchPrintWhite Wweb

Heather Barrie, ‘Clench’ [print]

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

WAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues. For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

About WAG
The Watkins Arcade Gallery–WAG–is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape. The venue will present shows year-round featuring work by Watkins students, alumni and other professional artists. For inquiries, contact [email protected]. WAG is the second Watkins-run gallery space, joining the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, the primary exhibiting space on the College’s campus in Metro Center.

Kevin Dietz b&w Wweb

Kevin Dietz, “The Secret Handshake” (woodcut)

Kevin Dietz: The work that I’ve created closely relates to the graphic narrative, metaphor, and reinterpreting the everyday through traditional methods of print and mark making. I draw a similar line through history as Ashley and Heather from religious medieval prints such as the Nuremberg Chronicles, but I also reference romantic symbolism, Guston, and underground comics from the 60′s and 80′s. The images harbor reflections from the immediacy of everyday: from the job market, academia, and the ever present tension between our social state of affairs.

Ashley Doggett 2

Ashley Doggett

Ashley Doggett: This current oeuvre has its preoccupations with the graphic narrative found in a world engrossed in modernity, racial identity, sexuality, and profound interpretations of history that challenge the audience to consider the extreme harshness of what has been accomplished in the modern American world, both past and present.

All three artists are offering the regalia of the iconic by creating the ultimate iconoclasm; by bringing forth their controversial ideals on the higher spheres of social, political, and religious institutions, they are in fact making commentary on cultural fetishism, the preoccupation of unveiling the obscure to a general audience, and challenging the social tension between race and religion.

HeatherBarrie_MyTribe

Heather Barrie, “My Tribe”

 

Ashley Doggett 1 Wweb

Ashley Doggett

 

Iconophilia Sept2014 WAG evite f

Watkins Collects “Monuments, Hotel Soap and Linear Progressions”

Posted on: August 27th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Opening reception for faculty show is September 4 in Currey Gallery

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents “Monuments, Hotel Soap and Linear Progressions,” a multiple media exhibition featuring recent work by faculty artists Mary Addison Hackett, Ariel Lavery, Robin Paris and Tom Williams, from September 4–26 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

MAHackett_Hotel Soap 50x39in

Mary Addison Hackett, “Hotel Soap” (50″ x 39″), 2014, oil on canvas

The exhibition’s opening reception, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, September 4, is free and open to the public.

An adjunct instructor in Watkins’ Department of Fine Art, Mary Addison Hackett is a painter who has recently returned to the South after an extended leave of absence. The paintings for this show are the result of fieldwork and were painted from direct observation of objects in-situ around her childhood home (which is also her current studio) as well as a recent camping trip. Progressing through the seasons they capture the nuances of day-to-day life as revealed in domestic, work and leisure spaces.

ArielLavery wall silver 2layers

Ariel Lavery, “As We Continue to Move Forward,” 2012, found objects and mixed media

 

 

 

 

Ariel Lavery, who joined the Watkins Fine Art department this semester as Assistant Professor of Sculpture, is exhibiting two sculptures that install together: “As We Continue to Move Forward” (found objects and mixed media) and “Linear Progression of Chest, Wall Shelf, Shoe Organizer, Broiler Pan, and Napkin Rings.” Lavery’s assembled sculptures and installations reflect on a concept of Middle America as it is defined in domestic goods. She borrows from American domestic vernacular to create mutated versions of home living spaces, “sampling” from her immediate surroundings as she collects detritus found in thrift stores, at garage sales, on Craigslist, and on the side of the road.

Robin Paris Tom Williams Lincoln 2

Robin Paris and Tom Williams, Statue of Abraham Lincoln by Adolph Alexander Weinman, Hodgenville, KY (installed 1909), 2014, archival pigment print

Associate Professor of Photography Robin Paris, in collaboration with Assistant Professor of Art History Tom Williams, will show photographic abstractions of figurative monuments made throughout the South and elsewhere. Paris and Williams set aside the lessons of “good” photography to transform the subjects into shadowy, indeterminate figures. These photographs obliterate the likenesses and context of these statues, but simultaneously emphasize their strident poses and emphatic gestures. In this way, they draw focus away from individual monuments and towards the generalized rhetoric of political monumentality, addressing the subtle persuasions of sculptures that often seem little more than props in the mise-en-scène of everyday life.

Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 1 to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.  Free parking is available in the campus lot.

About Mary Addison Hackett
Born and raised in the South, Hackett migrated to Los Angeles via Chicago, and has been exhibiting in commercial, non-profit and university galleries in the United States and abroad since the early 90′s. She holds an MFA in Studio Art from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a BFA in Painting from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her work alludes to the ever-shifting construction of meaning, memory and representation in day-to-day life. In her current work, Hackett hones her focus on a sense of place by engaging primarily in the practice of observational painting while still acknowledging her roots in abstraction. Recent exhibitions include Tinney Contemporary and Leu Gallery at Belmont University (Nashville); ACME and WEEKEND (Los Angeles); Torrance Art Museum (Torrance, CA); and John Davis Gallery (Hudson, NY). Her debut solo exhibition at Kristi Engle Gallery (2008) in Los Angeles was reviewed by the Los Angeles Times, and she has been featured in numerous other publications. She is represented by David Lusk Gallery; her first solo with the Nashville gallery opens October 1, 2014.

About Ariel Lavery 
Ariel Lavery graduated magna cum laude with her BFA from the University of Colorado Boulder (2007) and received her MFA from the University of Massachusetts Amherst (2013). She has exhibited nationally in Colorado, Kentucky, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, Texas, Tennessee, Vermont, and Washington, DC. Recent solo exhibitions include Project 1 at Zephyr Gallery in Louisville, KY and Detritus In Situ at the Herter Gallery, University of Massachusetts Amherst. Recent group exhibitions include Fresh at the AVA Gallery (Chattanooga, TN), Best of the Northeast at the Helen Day Art Center (Stowe, VT), and Ice Breaker 5 at the Ice Cube Gallery (Denver). She is also a recent recipient of the Artist Enrichment Grant from the Kentucky Foundation for Women.

Robin Paris Tom Williams coach

Robin Paris and Tom Williams, Statue of Coach E.A. Diddle by Russ Faxon, Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, (installed 2005), 2014, archival pigment print

About Robin Paris
Currently chair of the Photography department at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film, Robin Paris earned a BA in Studio Art from the Evergreen State College (Olympia, WA) and studied visual anthropology and creative writing before earning her MFA in photography from Savannah College of Art and Design. She spent a year as a resident artist at Anderson Ranch in Aspen, where she assisted such artists as Keith Smith and Jerry Uelsmann. She has worked in marketing and as a photo editor for small publishing companies in Georgia and Colorado. She currently works in historical processes, digital imaging and book works, and exhibits them nationally.

About Tom Williams
Tom Williams, assistant professor of art history at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film, is a graduate of the University of West Florida (BA, Art History), the State University of New York, Stony Brook (MA and PhD, Art History) and of the Whitney Independent Study Program. He has also taught at the School of the Visual Arts, New York; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Vanderbilt University, and his writings have appeared in Art in America, Grey Room and other publications.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Co. H Celebrates ‘Mystic Truths’ with July 12 Reception

Posted on: June 30th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Mystic Truths, a multi-media exhibition from Watkins College of Art, Design & Film’s student-led collective Co. H, will celebrate its summer run with a reception on Saturday, July 12, from 6 to 9 p.m. Featuring outstanding work in painting, printmaking, sculpture, drawing, photography, video and installation from 15 area artists, the show remains on view through July 18 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

The reception and exhibition are free and open to the public.

Participating artists are:mystic truths 6 Wweb

  • Caleb Adcock, Fine Art, senior (digital prints)
  • Mika Agari, Fine Art, senior (video)
  • David Anderson, Fine Art, junior (painting)
  • Heather Barrie, Fine Art, senior (printmaking)
  • Kevin Dietz, Fine Art, sophomore (printmaking)
  • Elisha Farahmand, Fine Art, junior (video)
  • Michael Hampton, BFA in Fine Art ‘14 (video)
  • Aaron Harper, Fine Art, senior (drawing)
  • Blake Holland, Film, senior (photography)
  • Casey Payne, Fine Art, junior (painting)
  • Zack Rafuls, Fine Art, senior (sculpture)
  • Alexine Rioux, BFA in Fine Art, ’14 (printmaking)
  • Kayla Saito, Fine Art, senior (sculpture)
  • Luke Weir, Fine Art, junior (conceptual/installation)
  • Weng Tze Yang, photography, senior (photographic installation)

 

mystic truths1 Wweb“Mystic Truths: A Group Show from Co. H and Friends” collects work from Co. H council members, collaborators and studio mates in order to present a survey of some of the best Watkins-created work. Showcasing current students and recent graduates, “Mystic Truths” includes work across many disciplines, including drawing, painting, sculpture, video, photography, installation and printmaking. The title of the show is pulled from Bruce Nauman’s 1967 neon sign piece “The True Artist Helps The World By Revealing Mystic Truths,” referencing the function of the artist in ironic and hopeful lights simultaneously while also directly supplanting the work within a contemporary context and dialogue.

Currey Gallery’s summer hours are Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.  Free parking is available in the campus lot.

About Co. Hmystic truths2 Wweb
A collective of artists from various disciplines of the visual arts, Co. H provides opportunities for both students and professionals pursuing and/or working in the arts. Founded at Watkins in 2011, Co. H activity includes hosting lecture by artists and art professionals, holding studio critiques and collaborating on multi-disciplinary performances within the community. Visit http://companyh.tumblr.com

About Bruce Nauman
From PBS.org/art21:
Born in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Bruce Nauman has been recognized since the early 1970s as one of the most innovative and provocative of America’s contemporary artists. Nauman finds inspiration in the activities, speech, and materials of everyday life. He graduated with a BFA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1964, and with an MFA from the University of California, Davis, in 1966. Confronted with the question “What to do?” in his studio soon after leaving school, Nauman had the simple but profound realization that “If I was an artist and I was in the studio, then whatever I was doing in the studio must be art. At this point art became more of an activity and less of a product.” Working in the diverse mediums of sculpture, video, film, printmaking, performance, and installation, Nauman concentrates less on the development of a characteristic style and more on the way in which a process or activity can transform or become a work of art. A survey of his diverse output demonstrates the alternately political, prosaic, spiritual, and crass methods by which Nauman examines life in all its gory details, mapping the human arc between life and death. The text from an early neon work proclaims: “The true artist helps the world by revealing mystic truths.” Whether or not we—or even Nauman—agree with this statement, the underlying subtext of the piece emphasizes the way in which the audience, artist, and culture at large are involved in the resonance a work of art will ultimately have. Nauman lives in New Mexico.

Bruce Nauman True Artist sign Bruce Nauman, “The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing Mystic Truths,” neon and clear glass tubing suspension supports; 59 x 55 x 2 inches, 1967(Philadelphia Museum of Art)

From smarthistory.khanacademy.org
Bruce Nauman’s neon sign asks a multitude of questions with regard to the 
ways in which the 20th century conceived both avant-garde art and the role of the 
artist in society. If earlier European modernists, such as Mondrian, 
Malevich, and Kandinsky, sought to use art 
to reveal deep-seated truths about the human condition and the role of the artist 
in general, then Bruce Nauman’s “The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing 
Mystic Truths” questions such transhistorical and universal 
statements. With regard to this work, Nauman said:

The most difficult thing about the whole piece for me was the statement. It 
was a kind of test—like when you say something out loud to see if you 
believe it. Once written down, I could see that the statement [...] was on 
the one hand a totally silly idea and yet, on the other hand, I believed it. 
It’s true and not true at the same time. It depends on how you interpret it 
and how seriously you take yourself. For me it’s still a very strong thought.

‘Communion of Selves’ Concludes Spring BFA Thesis Shows

Posted on: May 6th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film offers work from Samantha Carlson, Amy Clutter and Michele Graham in the mixed media show Communion of Selves, opening Thursday, May 8 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, with a reception from 6 to 8:30 p.m. This fifth and final installment in the BFA Thesis Exhibition Series from the Watkins Fine Art and Photography departments will be on view through May 18.

Carlson, a candidate for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Photography, presents her individually titled show The Psychic Intercourse of Social Reality, with works of photography, video, and printmaking that explore the human imperative for connection and how it is affected by and reflected in the modern world.

Clutter, a BFA in Fine Art degree candidate with an interest in film production design, stages Extractions of Faraway Nearby, a mixed media show investigating psychological spaces.

Fine Art major Graham incorporates painting, text-based art and folded paper forms into Sixty Four Thousand Five Hundred and Twelve, an investigation of habitual behavior through process, repetition and futility, with focus on the action of the artist and duration.

The group exhibition Communion of Selves and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot. For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615.383.4848.

Group show: Communion of Selves

Statement:  The group show title comes from a conceptual thread that runs through all of our work:  the theme of self. In contemporary art, the use of the self as subject matter is oftentimes considered taboo or self-indulgent; however, through this exhibit we assert that while the self refers to individual experience, it also has the capacity to encompass much larger discourse. Our work contends that the self is the most universal.

Samantha Carlson, Atlanta, GA
BFA in Photography
Show title: The Psychic Intercourse of Social Reality (performance, photography, video and printmaking)

Samantha Carlson sweater

Samantha Carlson, Untitled (sweaters, acupuncture needles)

Born in Chicago, Samantha Carlson grew up in Atlanta and has lived in Nashville since 2009. A photographer who specializes in performance, video, and printmaking, she is also involved in curatorial practices. She has exhibited in both Atlanta and Nashville (WAG, Chestnut Square Building, Cummins Station, Little Hamilton Collective, among others). She received Honorable Mention at the 2013 Currey Juried Student Show at Watkins, and a Photography Department Merit Scholarship.

Statement: This body of work explores the function of art as a form of language within the whole enterprise of human connection. The work contemplates issues of social relations made subjective and affected by different forms of communication, culture, the brain, psychology, and sociology. The work also addresses the human imperative for connection and networks through the development of different modes of language and the process of discovering of self-identity and how it is affected by and reflected in the modern world. By focusing on the abjection of the body, the work not only manifests my own subjective experience of interpersonal relations, but also acknowledges the lesser discussed painful, invasive, and abstract facets of connection and disconnection. Each piece is a manifestation of the psychic intercourse of my own social reality.

 

Amy Clutter untitled

Amy Clutter, Untitled (steel sheet, graphite, mylar)

Amy Clutter, East Liverpool, OH
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Extractions of Faraway Nearby (sculpture, installation, drawing, sound)

A native of East Liverpool, in eastern Ohio near the Pennsylvania and West Virginia borders, Amy Clutter moved to Nashville in 2009.  Her drawing “In Between” took  honorable mention in the 2013 Currey Juried Student Show. Her work in production design includes Candi Carpenter’s music video “You And Tom Petty” and the short film “Abilene” by alumna Justine Feldt (’13).  She was assistant in the art department on Dolly Parton’s music video “Home,” to be released this May.

Statement: This body of work investigates the psychological spaces that are created and perceived in our minds, and how the architecture of these psychic spaces shift when situated within the architecture of preexisting sites.

Michele Graham untitled

Michele Graham, Untitled (drywall, paint, standard staples)

Michele Graham, Madison, AL
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Sixty Four Thousand Five Hundred and Twelve (painting, text-based art, and paper folding)

Born in Huntsville, Alabama, Michele Graham been attached to an artistic lifestyle since early childhood on. She began primarily as a portrait painter, moving into more abstract ways of working in college career. She has experimented with a variety of art practices and styles over the years, from standard painting to folded paper.

Statement: This body of work investigates habitual behavior through process, repetition, and futility, setting it up as practice of dedication to a singular thing. In this mode the aesthetic outcome of the work is less significant, and more focused on the action of the artist and duration.

The five-part Spring 2014 Watkins BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions series includes Michael Taylor Cribbs, Michael Hampton and Sarah McDonald, March 27–April 6; Crystal Petrina and Alexine Rioux, April 10–20; Ray Palumbo and Chelsea Wright, April 18 (off-campus at Fort Houston); and Christopher Creasy, Jordan Martin and Hannah Taylor, April 24–May 4.

Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Admission and parking are free.

Carlson Clutter Graham BFA evite

Click image to enlarge evite

 

Christopher Creasy, Jordan Martin and Hannah Taylor Team Up for April 24 BFA Show

Posted on: April 20th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film offers a triple exhibition with work from Christopher Creasy, Jordan Martin and Hannah Taylor, opening Thursday, April 24 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, with a reception from 6 to 8:30 p.m. This fourth installment in the BFA Thesis Exhibitions Series from the Watkins Fine Art and Photography departments will be on view through May 4.

Creasy, a candidate for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Photography, presents Don’t Touch the Remote, with works of video art and sculpture exploring family dynamics and media addiction.

Jordan Martin, Movement of the City

Jordan Martin, “Movement of the City”

 

Martin, a BFA in Fine Art degree candidate, stages Gathered Movements, a series of works that investigates patterns and structures in nature through the use of drawings, etchings and sound.

 

 

 

HannahTaylor sitting painting

Hannah Taylor (sitting painting)

 

 

A painter who also works in mixed media work and sculpture, Fine Art major Taylor stages ALL THE MEAT IS TURKEY BUT MY THESIS EXHIBITION TITLE IS CHEW ON A STICK. Interested in perception of space and ideas of constructed versus found, she creates compositions that relate to architectural space and that have relationships to the body.

The exhibitions and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot.  For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615.383.4848.

Christopher Creasy, Olive Branch, MS
BFA in Photography
Show title: Don’t Touch the Remote (video art, sculpture)

Christopher Creasy grew up outside of Memphis in Olive Branch, MS, where he discovered the curiosities of photography. When photographing he strives to create a narrative within his images, whether in documentary, commercial or fine art fields. He has worked in reportage and portraiture photography and recently began experimenting with mixed media sculptures and video art to address themes of family and media, particularly the idea of replacing ideals of family with fictional character from TV and movies.

Before transferring to Watkins, he attended Northwest Mississippi Community College, where he won “Best News Spot Photograph” in the MPA’s Better Newspaper Contest’s student division.

Jordan Martin, Plate Walk

Jordan Martin, “Plate Walk”

 

Jordan Martin, Nashville
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Gathered Movements (graphite, charcoal, ink, wood, copper etchings, sound recordings, process art)

An artist who specializes in drawing and printmaking, Jordan Martin reveals patterns and structures in nature through process art and sound, investigating mark-making as the product of an idea that has been put into action.

Hannah Taylor, Vancouver, WA • hannahelainetaylor.com
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: ALL THE MEAT IS TURKEY BUT MY THESIS EXHIBITION TITLE IS CHEW ON A STICK (painting, sculpture, video)

HannahTaylor image from installation

Hannah Taylor (image from installation)

Hannah Taylor works primarily as a painter, which often extends to mixed media work and sculpture. Interested in perception of space and ideas of constructed versus found, her work subjectifies physical space through an investigation of forms both fabricated and gestural. Experimenting with unconventional mark making and playful interaction with objects, she creates compositions that relate to architectural space and that have relationships to the body.

In her thesis work, Taylor navigates patterns and reactions in personal and public environments. By focusing on the physical and sensational aesthetic of objects, marks and space, she constructs poetic narratives via conditions of indexicality to provoke feelings of fear, longing, detachment, and familiarity in the viewer.

She has participated in exhibitions in Nashville at Ground Floor Gallery (Girls! Girls! Girls! and It’s Hot in a Dog’s Head), ZieherSmith pop-up at ICON Nashville (Backstock), Cummins Station, the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery and WAG.

Watkins BFA Thesis April 24_May 4 evite

Click on evite to enlarge image

The rest of the five-part Spring 2014 Watkins BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions series includes Michael Taylor Cribbs, Michael Hampton and Sarah McDonald, March 27–April 6; Crystal Petrina and Alexine Rioux, April 10–20; Ray Palumbo and Chelsea Wright, April 18 (off-campus at Fort Houston); and Amy Clutter, Samantha Carlson and Michelle Graham, May 8–18.

 

Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Admission and parking are free.

Swaney Prize Shines on Film School’s Christin Sites

Posted on: April 4th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Christin Sites, a Film School senior from Hendersonville, was awarded the 2014 Robb Swaney Prize for Excellence in Visual Expression during judging held on March 27. Established in 2006 by Mary Jane Swaney in memory of her husband, noted Nashville architect Charles Robb Swaney, the $1,000 cash prize honors a student who produced “visual designs and patterns that spoke to others.”

Swaney 2014 win group

Walter Crouch, Christin Sites, Martin Shofner, Sharon Hels

Jurors Martin Shofner of Shofner Buck Architects/Architectsure and Walter Crouch of Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP, former associates of Mr. Swaney, and Watkins alumna Sharon Hels praised the cinematography and editing major for the technical excellence, composition and visual impact of the three-minute showcase reel.  Christin is the first Film School student to receive the honor.

Each department chair nominated two students to participate in the annual competition, and the artists brought examples of their work to display and discuss.

 

Congratulations to all the 2014 Swaney Prize nominees!

Erin Lord

Erin Lord, Art

 

Emily Stout

Emily Stout, Art

Jeremy Bolden and Christin Sites

Jeremy Bolden and Christin Sites, The Film School

 

Alexine Rioux, Fine Art

Swaney 2014 judging

Martin Shofner discusses work by Fine Art’s Alexine Rioux

Kayla Saito

Kayla Saito, Fine Art

 

Xavier Payne

Xavier Payne, Graphic Design

Katelyn Pennington

Katelyn Pennington, Graphic Design

 

Amhad Freeman

Amhad Freeman, Interior Design

Whitney Garnier, Interior Design

 

Sharon Stewart

Sharon Stewart, Photography

Chelsea Wright

Chelsea Wright, Photography

 

Swaney 2014 MShofner XPayne

Martin Shofner with Graphic Design’s Xavier Payne

photos by Sam Angel

Zack Rafuls Brings the Heat to WAG’s May 3 Show

Posted on: April 2nd, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents HELL IS HOT, an exhibition of new work by Fine Art junior Zack Rafuls, at its downtown gallery WAG during the May 3 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl.

Hell Is Hot Zack Rafuls HELL IS HOT, featuring sculpture, painting and printmaking, examines the schematization of individuals’ direct and indirect relationships to one another and to society at large, through the use of metaphorical objects, symbols, and signifiers.

“As individuals in the modern world, we are constantly in contact with societal and cultural systems that dictate and facilitate our day-to-day experiences,” said Rafuls. “These systems exist, as French philosopher Michel Foucault has theorized, as cultural institutions. The work presented in HELL IS HOT serves to analyze the manner in which such systems – specifically sexuality, technology, and consumer culture – engage with each other, while regulating and shaping our individual and collective psyche and behavior.”

WAG – an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery – is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

WAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues. For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit www.nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl

About Zack Rafuls

Zack Rafuls, Homer

“Homer” (acrylic, gesso, and enamel on wood panel)

A native of Miami, Florida, Zack Rafuls moved to Tennessee in his early teens, and to Nashville in 2011.  His work – primarily sculpture, installation, painting, printmaking and video – has been exhibited at Ground Floor Gallery, the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery at Watkins, Track One and Cummins Station. He is currently the chair of the art collective Co. H, a group of artists from various disciplines, and active in OOMFF, Co. H’s series of experimental happenings.  Co. H  recently exhibited their council show Seven Types of Play at WAG, self-published the second issue of their zine SPIT, and are currently planning a juried showcase of regional video art. Rafuls is an intern at Zeitgeist Gallery and works as a studio assistant in town. When he’s not making things, he’s making noise with his band Onri.

For more information, visit zackrafuls.tumblr.com

 

About WAG
WAG logo orange
The Watkins Arcade Gallery – WAG – is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape. The venue will present shows year-round featuring work by Watkins students, alumni and other professional artists. For inquiries, contact [email protected] WAG is the second Watkins-run gallery space, joining the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, the primary exhibiting space on the College’s campus in Metro Center.

Zack Rafuls Olive Oyl

“Olive Oyl” (fake flowers, aluminum hardware, and painted wood)

About Michel Foucault
French philosopher, historian, theorist and critic Michel Foucault (1926–1984) addressed the relationship between power and knowledge and how they are used as a form of social control through societal institutions. Among his most influential publications are The History of Madness (published as Folie et Déraison: Histoire de la folie à l’âge classique, 1961), The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception (1963), The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences (1966), and Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (1975).

More info at www.michel-foucault.com.

 

WAG May 3 2014 evite

Click on image to enlarge evite

Crystal Petrina and Alexine Rioux Double Up for Thesis Shows Opening April 10

Posted on: March 19th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film offers the second in a five-part series of BFA Thesis Exhibitions from the Departments of Fine Art and Photography, with work from Crystal Petrina and Alexine Rioux. The double show will open Thursday, April 10, with a reception from 6 to 8:30 p.m, and remain on display in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus through April 20.

Crystal Petrina I, Reaper cardPetrina, a candidate for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Photography, explores human animals and non-human animals and their isonomy in death through video installation, sculpture, and performance in I, Reaper.

Rioux, a BFA in Fine Art degree candidate, presents oil painting and mono prints in Capillary Waves, an aesthetic investigation of the language of material that documents time through a residual process of addition and subtraction, erosion and decomposition.

The exhibitions and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot.  For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615.383.4848.

Crystal Petrina, Fayetteville, TNcrystalpetrina.comCrystal Petrina skulls
BFA in Photography
Show title: I, Reaper (video installation, sculpture, performance)

Crystal Petrina is a photographer who specializes in portraiture as well as video and sculpture. Initially pursuing graphic design, she became a deviating artist, majoring in photography at Watkins but incorporating other fields of study, including film, biology, fine art and music, into her work.

Crystal Petrina bird body

Statement: “The idea that we are separated by species is a human animal concept. Perhaps there are inequalities between species in life, but we are all the same in death. It is in death that I bathe in the idea of a union of all species. To fully immerse myself in this concept, I have fully immersed myself in death by collecting, preserving and articulating various animal parts for art and for study–ethically sourced and of course, all in honor of the animal that has met its unfortunate end.”

 

Alexine Rioux 006 Alexine Rioux, White House, TN
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Capillary Waves (oil paintings, mono prints with drawing and/or polyester lithography)

A member of the Watkins-based art collective Co. H, Alexine Rioux has shown her work in several group exhibitions throughout Nashville. She has curated two recent student shows at WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery) and is preparing for Co. H’s upcoming video show.  A four-year Dean’s List student and 3rd place winner in the 2014 Currey juried show at Watkins, Rioux will serve an internship this summer at Zeitgeist Gallery under Lain York.

Statement: My work is an aesthetic investigation of the language of material that documents time through a residual process of addition and subtraction, erosion and decomposition.  The work describes a visual language derived and manipulated from observation, abstraction, and memory further distorted by the presence of the hand. Modes of working are considered as directly related to concepts of residual accumulation and excavation.  These processes describe a record of time through residue, memory, and a geological transitory space made specific by color relationships that remain ambiguous through subjective reading of each viewer.

Alexine Rioux 007 The Spring 2014 Watkins BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions kick off in the Currey Gallery March 27 Michael Taylor Cribbs, Michael Hampton and Sarah McDonald (through April 6), and continue April 24–May 4 with Christopher Creasy, Jordan Martin and Hannah Taylor; and May 8–18 with Amy Clutter, Samantha Carlson and Michelle Graham. Ray Palumbo and Chelsea Wright will present their show April 18 in an off-campus space.

Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Admission and parking are free.

CrystalPetrina_AlexineRioux

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Watkins Opens Spring BFA Thesis Exhibition Series: Michael Cribbs, Michael Hampton & Sarah McDonald

Posted on: March 4th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents BFA Thesis Exhibitions 2014, a five-part series of work by 13 graduating students in the Departments of Fine Art and Photography. First up is a triple exhibition from Michael Taylor Cribbs, Michael Hampton and Sarah McDonald, opening Thursday, March 27, with a reception from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Their work will be on display in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus through April 6.

Ralphy and Vuppé 1 - Michael Cribbs“Ralphy and Vuppé” by Michael Cribbs

Cribbs, a candidate for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Fine Art, seeks to transport the audience to a different world through digital painting, music, and installation with his show Ralphy and Vuppé, depicting a story that explores the ideas of imagination, freedom and adventure.

Hampton, also a BFA in Fine Art degree candidate, focuses on graphite drawings, video work, performance and soft sculpture in his show Golden Disappointment. His work follows the playful yet thoughtful mode of jokes, applying cartoons and outlandish performances to darker subtleties of common life. The exhibition also includes two short films inspired by classic cartoons,

Michael Hampton film still

from Michael Hampton’s “dumbhounded”

“dumbhounded” (16 min.) and “Fraidy Cat” (16 min.), screening in a double feature in the Watkins Theater at 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “dumbhounded is a humorous appropriation and representation of Droopy Dog’s debut cartoon, with editing that heightens the underlying oddities within the narrative while making a new experience as a whole. Similarly, “Fraidy Cat” (from a Tom and Jerry episode) focuses on the bizarre shift of the typical cat-chases-mouse format. The episode poses a rather vulnerable Tom Cat, the usual antagonist, as victim to the haunting whims of Jerry Mouse. The amusing turns to grave as the footage is prolonged and extended, repeated and stuttered, playing with the original purposes of the episode while stretching the limits of the joke.

McDonald, a candidate for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Photography, presents Actual Instances, a series of photographs taken on short walks and long drives throughout her home state of Tennessee. The collection of giclée prints combines ambiguous scenarios and familiar typologies to investigate how still images often romanticize the subject.

The exhibitions and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot.  For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615.383.4848.

RalphyandVuppé 2 by Michael Cribbs

from “Ralphy and Vuppé”

Michael Taylor Cribbs, Franklin, TNmichaelcribbs.blogspot.com
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Ralphy and Vuppé (illustration, digital painting, installation)

Michael Taylor Cribbs is an illustrator specializing in children’s book illustrations and narrative based work through a digital medium. He explores these narrative fantasies by using historical ideas within different categories of art, which include romanticism, concepts of the sublime, aspects of cinematography, surrealism, installation, and the incorporation of music within art.

Michael Hampton, Nashville michaelhamptonart.tumblr.com
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Golden Disappointment (graphite on paper, video, polyester toy fabric, ink on balloons)

Michael Hampton is a fine artist focused on graphite drawings, video work, performance, and soft sculpture.

Michael Hampton  graphite drawing 2

Michael Hampton (graphite on paper)

He has exhibited in various shows throughout the city including Staying the Course (2014) and Abstractions Imaginative Fictions (2013) at WAG, Pink Lemonade (2013) at Ground Floor Gallery, and Projections (2013), at Platetone Print. He is also an active council member of the Co. H artist collective at Watkins and has performed stand-up comedy at Zanies, Mercy Lounge, the High Watt, East Room and Cult Fiction Underground.

Hampton’s work explores the tropes of jokes and humor and their malleability within a critical frame. He is interested in the darker subtleties and rich actualities that can be surfaced through humorous means. Cartoon imagery lends itself to the hands of thoughtful comedy and appropriated play, offering at once something simple while also speaking to something far more complex. In his thesis exhibition Golden Disappointment, Hampton pulls at these underlying narratives through processes of stacking, stuttering, isolating and amplifying. The works also bring into question the limit of a joke and champion an acceptable futility that teaches us how to lose.

Sarah McDonald, Nashville • sarahmcdonald.net
BFA in Photography
Show title: Actual Instances (medium format photography, giclée prints)

SarahMcDonald_Hermitage

“Hermitage,” Sarah McDonald

Sarah McDonald is interested in everyday moments that make up a larger unknown narrative. Actual Instances presents a collection of images taken on short walks and long drives throughout her home state of Tennessee. McDonald combines ambiguous scenarios and familiar typologies to investigate how still images often romanticize the subject. She is thinking about repetition, desire, disillusionment and repetition.

McDonald won first place in the 2013 Currey Juried Student Show at Watkins and was a finalist in the Nashville Scene’s 2011 Photography Contest; her photography is currently on view in the annual Community Arts Program Student Exhibit in Cummins Station. Her work often focuses on travel, place and the passage of time. In addition to photography, her creative pursuits include bookbinding, sewing and collage.

Watkins BFA 3.27.14 Cribbs_Hampton_McDonald evite large

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The Spring 2014 Watkins BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions will continue in the Currey Gallery April 10–20 with Crystal Petrina and Alexine Rioux; April 24–May 4 with Christopher Creasy, Jordan Martin and Hannah Taylor; and May 8–18 with Amy Clutter, Samantha Carlson and Michelle Graham. Ray Palumbo and Chelsea Wright will present their show April 18 in an offsite space.

Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Admission and parking are free.

Co. H Goes Out to ‘Play’ at WAG’s April Show

Posted on: March 4th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents Seven Types of Play, an exhibition of works in various media from students in the Co. H art collective, at its downtown gallery WAG during the April 5 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl.

The show’s concept was guided by notion of “play,” specifically through the National Institute for Play’s delineation of seven distinct types: Attunement, Body, Object, Social, Imaginative, Narrative and Transformative. With each artist creating within one type of play, rules operated in place of theme as a structuring element and built continuity through the very act of making.

The seven participating artists, all council members of Co. H, are:Co.H logo

  • Mika Agari (Fine Art), object play
  • David Anderson (Fine Art), transformative play
  • Aaron Harper (Fine Art), imaginative play
  • Blake Holland (The Film School), narrative play
  • Zack Rafuls (Fine Art), attunement play
  • Alexine Rioux (Fine Art), body play
  • Kayla Saito (Fine Art), social play.

Work will include drawing, painting, video, digital prints, sculpture, performance and social practice.

Pictured at top: Blake Holland, “Pixel-Eyes” (digital print)

Mika Agari - 50¢

Mika Agari, “50¢” (still from performance)

“Play is an idea that comes up in conversations about making in class and studios all the time, and it seems to be important to all of our practices in some way,” said Zack Rafuls.  “So when we came across the National Institute for Play’s seven definitions – and there were seven of us – we thought it was a perfect structuring basis for the show.”

WAG – an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery – is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

Downtown Art Crawl logoWAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues.  For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

About Co. H
A collective of artists from various disciplines of the visual arts, Co. H provides opportunities for both students and professionals pursuing and/or working in the arts. Founded at Watkins in 2011, Co. H activity includes hosting lecture by artists and art professionals, holding studio critiques and collaborating on multi-disciplinary performances within the community. Visit http://companyh.tumblr.com

About WAG
WAG logo orange
The Watkins Arcade Gallery  is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape.  The venue presents shows year-round featuring work by Watkins students, alumni and other professional artists. For inquiries, contact [email protected]. WAG is the second Watkins-run gallery space, joining the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, the primary exhibiting space on the College’s campus in Metro Center.

About The National Institute for Play
The National Institute for Play believes that as play is woven into the fabric of social practices, we will dramatically transform our personal health, our relationships, the education we provide our children and the capacity of our corporations to innovate. Visit nifplay.org.

WAG April2014 CoH evite f

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