Archive for the ‘Film News’ Category

Watkins “Best Of” Showcase Screens Seven April 16 at Nashville Film Festival

Posted on: April 10th, 2016 by Caroline Davis

In conjunction with the 46th annual Nashville Film Festival, Watkins College of Art, Design & Film will present a free screening of the past year’s most outstanding productions on Saturday, April 16, beginning at 4 p.m. at Regal Cinemas, Green Hills Stadium 16.

“The Watkins Student Film Showcase” will offer a lineup of short narratives (not in NaFF competition) selected by Film School faculty from all completed films in each of the four production classes from the 2015 spring and fall semesters.

There is no admission charge, but reservations are strongly encouraged because seating is limited: email name and contact information to reservations@watkins.edu (limit 2 tickets per person)

The films, in screening order, are:

  • Van Gogh’s Left Ear, directed by Emma Holyfield
  • Alice, directed by Robin Summer
  • Moscow Station, directed by Alexander Mattingly
  • Lunch Letters, directed by Micah Atkinson
  • Pillow Talk, directed by Jason Harper
  • Willfully Ignorant, Dangerously Stupid, directed by S.T. Davis
  • Aspies, directed by Travis Slagle

This is the third consecutive year that Watkins has partnered with NaFF on this showcase.

Click to enlarge poster

Click to enlarge poster

Now in its 46th year, the Nashville Film Festival (NaFF) runs April 14–23 at the Regal Green Hills Cinema. Visit nashvillefilmfestival.org for the 200-film schedule of narrative and documentary shorts and features, world premieres and guest artists.

About the Program

The Film School at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film is distinguished by a film curriculum that explores the artistic, technical and business aspects of independent filmmaking. With a focus on dramatic narrative film, the Film School helps students find their personal voice and style in order to incorporate these elements into their narrative work. All film students take film courses their first year of study and begin production within their second year, depending on their program of study.

Production courses are small, allowing for faculty mentoring and advising and close collaboration with colleagues.

 still from "Lunch Letters"

still from Micah Atkinson’s “Lunch Letters”

The Film School offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (BFA) in Film, with classes in producing, directing, screenwriting, cinematography and editing. In addition to the film curriculum, undergraduate students are required to complete a Visual Arts Core of studies and a General Education Core, designed to create a program for a well-rounded filmmaker and visual artist.

In Fall 2016, Watkins launches a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Film Production. The college’s first graduate program is a two-year course of study designed on a “flex” schedule, and applications are now being accepted via microsite MFA.Watkins.edu.

Watkins’ Film Production MFA offers an immersive, collaborative experience in narrative and non-narrative storytelling, with training in producing, directing, cinematography, screenwriting and editing, and emphasis on professional practice. Core courses will be held on evenings and weekends, allowing working professionals to enroll while continuing in their jobs. Additional electives will be offered during weekday daytime hours and summer opportunities are planned for students to complete courses, including independent study, internships and an independent feature/series project.

Nashville FIlm Festival logoAbout the Nashville Film Festival

Nashville Film Festival (NaFF), April 14–23, 2016, presented by Nissan, brings the world to Nashville in an extended 10-day celebration of film. NaFF’s hub is Regal Green Hills Cinemas with 200 competition films, educational presentations and parties.  NaFF is a public festival attended by filmmakers and industry insiders and an Academy Award Qualifying Event for short films.  In addition to Nissan, NaFF is sponsored by Comcast/Xfinity, Regal Entertainment Group, Southwest Airlines, Tennessee Arts Commission and Metro Arts of Nashville. The Festival annually garners notice from the Associated Press, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal online, MovieMaker Magazine, Film Festival Today, IndieWire, Variety, Billboard, New York and Script Magazine.

Callie Khouri To Deliver Watkins Commencement Address at May 14 Ceremonies

Posted on: April 10th, 2016 by Caroline Davis

Callie Khouri, Oscar-winning screenwriter of Thelma and Louise and creator/executive producer of the hit television series Nashville, will be the keynote speaker for Watkins College of Art, Design & Film’s 2016 Commencement on Saturday, May 14.

The graduation ceremonies will be held on the Watkins campus, beginning at 10 a.m., and the public is invited.

Ms. Khouri galvanized women and sparked nationwide debate in 1991 with the hit movie Thelma and Louise–her screenwriting debut–which was nominated for six Academy Awards. She won the Oscar, the Golden Globe, the Writers Guild of America Award, and a PEN Literary Award for best original screenplay. Her second film, released in 1995, was Something to Talk About, starring Julia Roberts, Dennis Quaid and Robert Duvall. She made her directorial debut in 2002 with Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood (which she also adapted for the screen), featuring Sandra Bullock and Maggie Smith, followed by the 2008 caper comedy Mad Money with Diane Keaton and Queen Latifah.

Callie Khouri with "Nashville" stars Charles Esten and Connie Britton

Callie Khouri with “Nashville” stars Charles Esten and Connie Britton

Currently, Ms. Khouri is writer, director and executive producer of the ABC/Lionsgate music drama Nashville (which she also created), in its fourth season.

Dr. J. Kline, president of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film, described Ms. Khouri as, “a role model and inspiration, not just for our film students, but all our students. Through the course of her career she has pursued various avenues of success, while all the time remaining an engaged member of the artistic community on a national and a local level. She has created opportunities for Nashville artists of all stripes and afforded many of our students their first professional experience. We are thrilled and honored to have her as our commencement speaker.”

Producer Mimi Polk Gitlin, actress Geena Davis, journalist Anne Thompson and writer Callie Khouri at The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' 20th anniversary screening of "Thelma & Louise" (August 25, 2011)

Producer Mimi Polk Gitlin, actress Geena Davis, journalist Anne Thompson and Callie Khouri at Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ 20th anniversary screening of “Thelma & Louise” (2011)

After graduating from high school in Paducah, Kentucky, Callie Khouri attended Purdue University, taking classes in landscape architecture and drama. She lived in Nashville for a time before heading to Los Angeles in 1982 to pursue a theater arts career, studying at the Strasburg Institute. In 1985 she shifted her focus to film production, beginning as an assistant on commercials and music videos and eventually becoming a music video producer. During this time she wrote the script that would become Thelma and Louise. In addition to its success Hollywood success, it earned the London Film Critics Circle Award for Film of the Year and a nomination for Best Original Screenplay from the British Academy of FIlm and Television Arts. Ms. Khouri has served on the Writers Guild of America’s board of directors and on the Writer’s Guild Foundation’s board of trustees, and was a member of Hollywood Women’s Political Committee, Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting Women’s Media Watch Project.

She has also taught filmmaking and theater arts, including a writing and directing course through the Arts Initiative at Columbia University.

Read 25th Thelma and Louise anniversary interview with Geena Davis and  Susan Sarandon  

Following the welcome from Watkins President Kline, Ms. Khouri will deliver the Commencement address. Vice President for Academic Affairs Joy McKenzie will then present BFA and BA candidates in art, film, fine art, graphic design, interior design and photography, and Samuel E. Stumpf, Jr., chair of the Watkins Board of Trustees, will confer the degrees.

The Class of 2016 will be the first to graduate under the leadership of President Kline, who began as the institution’s 16th president in July 2015. In February, Watkins launched its first graduate-degree program, the Master of Fine Arts in Film Production, a two-year course of study designed on a flex schedule for working professionals (mfa.watkins.edu).

Callie Khouri, interviewed for "Makers"

Callie Khouri, interviewed for “Makers”

More about Callie Khouri:

• Multi-part interview with Makers, the largest video collection of women’s stories

• Syd Field: The Art of Visual Storytelling: Callie Khouri on Creating Character: ‘Thelma and Louise’ 

• Chicago Tribune, July 1, 1991: Callie Khouri Answers Critics of ‘Thelma and Louise’

 

Watkins and Kiwa Digital Partner To Bring Industry Innovator VoiceQ Into Film School Program

Posted on: March 10th, 2016 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film has added VoiceQ, the most advanced ADR and dubbing cueing system in the world, to its film curriculum, making it the first school in the country to use this innovative post-production software in a classroom setting.

Developed by New Zealand-based Kiwa Digital Ltd, VoiceQ speeds up the ADR (additional dialogue recorded) and replacement process in the post-production stage of film and television production. Not every location where a film is shot is sound friendly, and re-recording dialogue and dubbing can be an expensive and tedious process. As the most advanced of the rythmo band software options available on the international market, VoiceQ is credited as halving preparation, recording and editing time over traditional options.

“There isn’t a more intuitive and powerful dialogue looping software available. It’s a major upgrade for our campus facility, and will allow our students to utilize the same professional tools they will find in the industry,” said Watkins adjunct Scott Hallgren, who teaches the Film School’s sound classes. “Watkins filmmakers can now have the same experiences as directors and sound editors in working with actors in post-production situations.”

“Kiwa shares Watkins’ vision that the future of the industry is wide open, and their expertise in preparing young filmmakers makes them an ideal partner,” said Allan Schollnick, vice president, North America business development for Kiwa Digital.

Students and area professionals from Women in Film & Television enjoyed using VoiceQ at a recent workshop

Women in Film & Television

The VoiceQ software will be part of Watkins’ introductory and post-production sound classes, and be used to enhance and bring value to the many student films made each semester. Additionally, it has been featured in a recent professional sound seminar at the school, and will be introduced to high school students from the Governor’s School of the Arts this summer.

The implementation of this advanced post-production system follows another recent Watkins milestone: the announcement of Watkins’ first graduate film program, the Masters of Fine Art in Film Production, now accepting applications for Fall 2016.

“We are committed to our students being well versed in the innovations from leading edge companies and the techniques being employed in the film industry,” said Richard Gershman, chair of the Film School. “Watkins is very appreciative that Kiwa Digital is providing our students another professional-level experience through the VoiceQ software.”

About VoiceQ: An ADR and Dubbing Re-evolution

Developed by Kiwa Digital Ltd, VoiceQ software speeds up the dialogue creation and replacement process in the post-production stage of film and television production. The most advanced of the rythmo band software options on the international market, it is credited as halving preparation, recording and editing time over traditional options. The software is disruptive innovation, described by industry commentator Patrick Long Taylor as “breathing new life into an old process from the early days of sound… pulling the rythmo band into the digital age.” VoiceQ is now licensed by market leaders in USA, Brazil, South Africa and Europe, and supported by leading media companies and a network of global resellers. More info at voiceq.com.

About Watkins
With a 130-year history in the visual arts, Watkins College of Art, Design & Film in Nashville is a four-year baccalaureate college offering BFA degrees in Film, Fine Art, Graphic Design, Interior Design and Photography, a BA in Art, and an MFA in Film Production (launching Fall 2016). Watkins became a baccalaureate college in 1997, and is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges
(SACSCOC); the MFA in Film Production is pending SACSCOC approval.Watkins College of Art, Design & Film

From its establishment of the Film School more than 20 years ago – bringing the first BFA in Film program in the state – Watkins has been recognized as a leader in educating and training filmmakers while preparing them for a number of opportunities for professional employment. Students at the college enjoy extensive, dedicated production facilities, with sound stages, digital editing labs, post-production audio/music studios, mix theater, color correction suite, writing lab, production office, and professional movie theater, plus a media center of state-of-the-art equipment including cameras, lighting, grip, and sound gear for students to use on campus or on location.

The Film programs at Watkins offer students an opportunity to grow and expand their skills, increase their knowledge, develop their aesthetic, and contribute to a very competitive and constantly evolving film industry. Watkins alumni credits include television (“Nashville,” “Dexter,” “Sesame Street,” “Walking Dead”), film (American Hustle, Zero Dark Thirty, The Amazing Spider Man), music videos (Dolly Parton, Taylor Swift), studios and networks (Sony Pictures, Warner Bros., NBC Universal, Discovery, A&E, Participant Media) and a variety of high-profile companies and franchises (Big Machine Label Group, Participant Media, TMZ, CAA, Tennessee Titans.)

TV Director Bethany Rooney Conducts Master Class at Film School on February 24

Posted on: February 22nd, 2016 by Caroline Davis

Bethany Rooney, who has directed more than 200 episodes of prime-time television during her lengthy career, will speak at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film on Wednesday, February 24. A recent episode she directed of the CBS stalwart Criminal Minds will be screened at 6 p.m., followed by a Q & A session.

Ms. Rooney is in town to direct an episode of the ABC-TV series Nashville; she previously spoke at the Film School in November 2013, when shooting a second-season episode of the show. Richard Gershman, chair of The Film School at Watkins, will facilitate the master class-session in the Watkins Theater, discussing the roles and responsibilities of a television director and her involvement with some of entertainment’s most iconic shows.

The event is free and the public is invited

Bethany Rooney redMs. Rooney’s three-decades Hollywood career has defied the odds of Hollywood: In a business where less than fifteen percent of directors are women, she has been at the helm of more than 200 hours of single-camera, narrative, prime-time television. A partial list of her series credits includes Criminal Minds, Scandal, NCIS, NCIS New Orleans, 90210, Rizzoli & Isles, Castle, Gilmore Girls, Grey’s Anatomy, and Pretty Little Liars.

“If you have had a favorite TV drama in the last 20 years, there’s a good chance Bethany Rooney has worked on it,” said Professor Gershman, a fellow DGA member who met her in Los Angeles early in their careers. “Her experience rivals any television director working in this field. For perspective, 200 hours is enough episodes to fill about eight seasons of an episodic show.”

Bethany Rooney began her directing career on the 1980’s iconic television show, St. Elsewhere, where she had served as associate producer. Additional directing credits include the series Desperate Housewives, Arrow, Ally McBeal, Private Practice, Brothers & Sisters, In Plain Sight, Boston Public, Weeds, Parenthood, One Tree Hill, Dr. Quinn and Drop Dead Diva, and eight television movies (with three Danielle Steel adaptations for NBC).

BethanyRooney DirectorsTellStory cover WwebRegarded as an actor’s director, Ms. Rooney has guided the performances of stars such as Denzel Washington, Hilary Swank, Mary Tyler Moore, Angela Bassett, George Clooney, Alfre Woodard, Felicity Huffman, Sally Field and Robert Downey Jr.

Ms. Rooney is also an author; with Mary Lou Belli, she wrote the insider’s look Directors Tell the Story: Master the Craft of Television and Film Directing (Focal Press, 2011), a practical guide utilized in directing classes on many college campuses.

Ms. Rooney holds a master’s degree from Bowling Green State University (Ohio). Based in Los Angeles, she has taught directing at UCLA Extension and numerous acting workshops in the LA area, most recently through Steppenwolf Theatre West. She also leads the Warner Bros. Directing Workshop as well as seminars in SAG/AFTRA’s young professionals program.

She is a member of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and has served on several committees for the Directors Guild of America.

Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in Metro Center; free parking is available in the campus lot. For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615-383-4848.

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film is a four-year baccalaureate college offering a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film, Fine Art, Graphic Design, Interior Design and Photography, a Bachelor of Arts in Art, Certificates in Film and Interior Design, and a Master of Fine Arts in Film Production. Established in 1885 as a community-based learning institution, Watkins became a baccalaureate college in 1997, and continues to shape and influence the cultural horizon and economy of our community through art, design and film instruction in an academic setting, as well as through the Community Education program for youth, teens and adults.

FILM Julian's Set-0145 WwebThe Film School at Watkins is distinguished by a film curriculum that explores the artistic, technical and business aspects of independent filmmaking. With a focus on dramatic narrative film, the Film School helps students find their personal voice and style in order to incorporate these elements into their narrative work. Production courses are small, allowing for faculty mentoring and advising and close collaboration with colleagues. Watkins offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (BFA) in Film with concentration in Producing, Directing, Screenwriting, Cinematography and Editing, and a Certificate in Film for those who already hold a Bachelor’s Degree.

Watkins alumni credits include television (“Nashville,” “Dexter,” “Sesame Street,” “Walking Dead”), film (American Hustle, Zero Dark Thirty, The Amazing Spider Man), music videos (Dolly Parton, Taylor Swift), studios and networks (Sony Pictures, Warner Bros., NBC Universal, Discovery, A&E, Participant Media) and a variety of high-profile companies and franchises (Big Machine Label Group, Participant Media, TMZ, CAA, Tennessee Titans.)

Watkins is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC); the MFA in Film Production is pending SACSCOC approval.

 

Watkins Flexes Film Expertise by Launching MFA Program

Posted on: February 15th, 2016 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film is expanding its degree offerings by launching a Master of Fine Arts in Film Production, it was announced by Dr. J. Kline, president of Watkins. The school’s first graduate program, which is a two-year course of study, will begin in the Fall 2016 semester and applications are now being accepted via microsite mfa.watkins.edu.

Designed on a “flex” schedule, the Film Production MFA offers an immersive, collaborative experience in narrative and non-narrative storytelling, with training in producing, directing, cinematography, screenwriting, and editing, and emphasis on professional practice. Core courses will be held on evenings and weekends, allowing working professionals to enroll while continuing in their jobs.

FILM Preview Day 2016 soundstage crew 4 WwebAdditional electives will be offered during weekday daytime hours and summer opportunities are planned for students to complete courses, including independent study, internships and an independent feature/series project. The Film School enjoys a long-standing association with the Nashville Film Festival, and MFA thesis screenplays or films will be entered or showcased at the NaFF.

“As a cultural and artistic center of Nashville for well over a century, Watkins is more than excited to launch this new initiative,” said President Kline. “Our master’s program in film production not only immediately addresses the need for practical, professional training in an industry that is simply exploding, but, more than that, speaks to the college’s ever growing role in the life of our creative community. With our beautiful production facilities and first-class faculty already in place, we are ready to go!”

Richard Gershman, associate professor and chair of the Film School, will direct the MFA program and lead the distinguished full-time and adjunct faculty (whose professional credentials include DGA, WGA, ASC, ACE and SAG-AFTRA memberships).

FILM Katie's Set 1-0622 WwebFrom its establishment of the Film School more than 20 years ago – bringing the first BFA in Film program in the region – Watkins has been recognized as a leader in educating and training filmmakers while preparing them for a number of opportunities for professional employment. Students at the college enjoy extensive, dedicated production facilities, with sound stages, digital editing labs, post-production audio/music studios, mix theater, color correction suite, writing lab, production office, and professional movie theater, plus a media center of state-of-the-art equipment including cameras, lighting, grip, and sound gear for students to use on campus or on location.

“Watkins is looking for students who want to engage in a thoroughly professional and rigorous program, designed to take filmmakers to the next level,” said Professor Gershman. “The need for expert visual, digital content has expanded to include almost all businesses and certainly any with a presence on the web.  We want to educate and train the next generation of filmmakers to engage an audience across multiple platforms with creative, inspired, meaningful content.”

To apply, visit MFA.Watkins.edu. More program information is available via watkins.edu/academics/film-mfa, or contact 615.277.7418 or admissions@watkins.edu. Fall 2016 semester begins on August 18.

FILM Justine Feldt w camera on video shoot WwebThe Film programs at Watkins offer students an opportunity to grow and expand their skills, increase their knowledge, develop their aesthetic, and contribute to a very competitive and constantly evolving film industry. Watkins alumni credits include television (“Nashville,” “Dexter,” “Sesame Street,” “Walking Dead”), film (American Hustle, Zero Dark Thirty, The Amazing Spider Man), music videos (Dolly Parton, Taylor Swift), studios and networks (Sony Pictures, Warner Bros., NBC Universal, Discovery, A&E) and a variety of high-profile companies and franchises (Big Machine Label Group, Participant Media, TMZ, CAA, Tennessee Titans.)

Established in 1885 as a community-based learning institution, Watkins became a baccalaureate college in 1997, and continues to shape and influence the cultural horizon and economy of our community through art, design and film instruction in an academic setting, as well as through the Community Education program for youth, teens and adults. Watkins is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC); the MFA in Film Production is pending SACSCOC approval.

MFA Film Pro facebook_ads 1 editlab Wweb

Alumni Filmmakers Tell “Hear Me Now” Story in Bullying Documentary

Posted on: February 11th, 2016 by Caroline Davis

Hear Me Know screen shot cr WwebIt’s always good to come home! Watkins welcomed Film School alumni Bill Cornelius (’05) and Zac Adams (’00) to the Watkins Theater for a special screening of Hear Me Now, a documentary about school bullying.

The 52-minute film is the culmination of a five-year project by writer/director/producer Cornelius through his company Halangarde Pictures; co-producers were Adams, Steven C. Knapp and Mike Stryker. After the screening, students enjoyed a Q&A with the filmmakers.

More info in Hear Me Now Press Kit(1)

Hear Me Now writer/producer/director Bill Cornelius, co-producers Mike Stryker and Zac Adams, and Film School chair Richard Gershman

Hear Me Now writer/producer/director Bill Cornelius, co-producers Mike Stryker and Zac Adams, and Film School chair Richard Gershman

Film School’s Spring 2016 Auditions Set for February 6

Posted on: January 30th, 2016 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film will hold a general casting call for Spring 2016 student film projects on Saturday, February 6, at the Watkins campus in Metro Center.

Directors of approximately a dozen productions from the BFA film program at Watkins will be looking for actors of all ages. Student films are being made under the SAG/AFTRA student film agreement and therefore all current union members are allowed to participate. Actors are asked to bring résumés and head shots for each audition (or a photo can be taken at the reading).

Ava DuVernay on the set of "Selma" (2014)

Ava DuVernay on the set of “Selma” (2014)

Auditions will consist of cold readings from the script (with on-camera readings at the discretion of each director). Casting breakdowns and proposed shoot dates (usually over a 3-day/Friday–Sunday period) for individual productions will be posted to this page and distributed on site.

Audition slots will be divided according to gender and age throughout the day (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.).

Individual appointments are not available.

  • 10 to 11 a.m. – Leading men, age range 19-40
  • 11 a.m. to noon – Leading and character men, age range 40 and up
  • Noon to 1 p.m. – Leading women, age range 19-40
  • 1 to 2 p.m. – Leading and character women, age range 40 and up
  • 3 to 4 p.m. – Young men and women, age range 8-18

NOTE:  No overall make-up audition session will be offered. However, after production breakdowns are posted, actors who cannot attend the February 6 casting day may contact specific directors concerning particular roles. If headshots and résumés are submitted electronically, please include name in file title.

All cast members will be invited to a screening of projects at the end of the semester and will have access to an online copy of the film and a quick-time file (without music) to cut into a reel.

For any questions not answered here, email auditions@watkins.edu. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in Metro Center (across from the Looby). Free parking is available in the campus lot.

EXTRA OPPORTUNITY: Film School Actor/Director Workshop

The Film School is looking for actors who want to participate in our directing workshop, working with student-directors who will be filming scenes this semester [February 9 through April 28] during  3-hour sessions on Tuesday and Thursday evenings (6-9 p.m.) Each class session is devoted to one scene; therefore, the commitment is only for 3 hours, unless an actor is cast in multiple scenes.

Sides will be available on February 6 outside the casting room. There will be plenty of roles to consider as up to 9 student-directors will be casting 18 scenes. Please indicate to the students present if you are not available on certain days. Callbacks may be held at the discretion of the student-director. Actors will be provided with an edited, digital copy of their scene.

The instructor is Richard Gershman, Chair of the Film School who has directed nationally for theatres like the Mark Taper Forum and Seattle Repertory Theatre and for CBS dramas Chicago Hope and Judging Amy. He has worked with many notable actors including Adam Arkin, Amy Brenneman, Tyne Daly and Mark Harmon.

HOWIE GRAVE: TEENAGE REAPER
Director: Micah Atkinson = matkinson@watkins.edu
Union/Non-Union
Production Type: Student Production III With Dialogue
Project length: 20 pages, 15-17 min
Shooting Location: Nashville/Murfreesboro
Shoot Dates: March 26-27, April 2-3
Compensation: No Pay, DVD copy, digital file and meals

SYNOPSIS: “Howie Grave” is an anti-suicide themed production. The story revolves around Howie, a teen who has prematurely ended his own life, and consequently has had his spirit returned to earth where he must carry out the duties of a grim reaper until his true time of departure.

CHARACTERS:
• HOWIE GRAVE [Lead/18]: A melancholy, wondering young man. He carries a fairly reserved demeanor; harboring his emotions, he often behaves in a gritted-teeth, white-knuckled manner. (He and GRIMM are both spirits)

• GRIMMOTHY/GRIMM [Lead/18]: He retains the aura of a surfer boy. He is easy going and laid back, though perhaps to fault, resulting in distant, passive and sometimes narcissistic qualities. (He and HOWIE are both spirits)

• MRS. GRAVE Howie’s mother is presented in a time of grieving and is portrayed bearing similar personality traits to those of her son. She is quiet thoughtful and insightful.

• GIRL [Supporting/17-18]: A recent love interest of Howie’s. Actor must be able to give a subtle yet strong performance.

• FRIEND [Supporting]: A female friend of Mrs. Grave’s who is at her side during the scene of grieving. Though with fewer lines, she must be emotive and comforting.

• RECENTLY DECEASED MAN [Supporting]: Looking for a heavier set, slightly older man who is comfortable being presented as a slobbish, recently deceased body. While the role is non-speaking, the performer will be featured in an entire scene.

MISTER ALLEIN
Director: Dalton Malone = dmalone@watkins.edu
SAG-AFTRA Signatory or Non Union
Production Type: Student Production II With Dialogue
Project length: 10-15 minutes
Shooting Location: Davidson County
Shoot Dates: April 3, 9-10
Compensation: No Pay, DVD copy, digital file and meals

SYNOPSIS: After Izaak Allein retires, he loses his wife and faces betrayal, walking a solitary road to forgiveness.
“For if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive others their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins.”–Matthew 6:14-15.

CHARACTERS:
• IZAAK MARX ALLEIN [Lead/60s or 70s]: Of average height and build, Izaak is a war veteran. Quick-witted, he was a salesman for 40 years. Izaak is slightly hunched over from age and is in the very early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. He lives alone. Izaak is very forgiving.

• MIRIAM MAGDALA [Lead/20s]: A nurse, she is athletic and homely, and the oldest of three children. Miriam is filled with desolation, despair and love. She sometimes confuses the three, which causes bad decisions.

• MELVIN SMITH [Supporting/30s]: Pale and tall, he works as a mid-level manager for a sales firm. He loves his job and himself. Melvin is aristocratic without the money.

• DWAYNE ARSCH [Supporting/20s]: Short, portly and a bit of an adulator. Dwayne is from a poor neighborhood. He is an only child.

• ELLEN JANE [Supporting/mid to late 30s]: Happy, heavy set, easily excited woman; the secretary pool is her whole life.

• DOROTHY ALLEIN [Supporting/60s or 70s]: Dorothy suffers from late stage Alzheimer’s disease and organ failure. She married Izaak very young. Dorothy was loyal out of necessity.

• OFFICE STAFF [Supporting/Extras]: Any age and gender. Includes secretaries.

• NURSING HOME STAFF [Supporting/Extras]: Any age and gender. Includes doctors and nurses.

• MOURNERS [Supporting/Extras]: Any age, gender.

PROTECTOR
Director: Jonathan Terry = jterry@watkins.edu
SAG-AFTRA Signatory or Non-Union
Production Type: Student (Production III) With Dialogue
Project length: Approx. 10-15 minutes
Shooting Location: Chattanooga, Tennessee
Shoot Dates: February 26-28
Compensation: Deferred payment, no worker’s compensation, DVD copy, digital file, housing, and meals.

NOTICE: This short film will contain violence and language.

SYNOPSIS: Kate is pushed to the brink; as she investigates her new neighbors, she suppresses anger of her own.

CHARACTERS:
• KATE WINTON (Lead/early 20s): A flight attendant, she has an anger problem that she’s been dealing with through yoga. She is extremely suspicious of her new neighbors and decides to enter their home to find out more about them.

• BETH JOHNSON (Supporting/early 20’s): Kate’s best friend is a thinker, not a fighter. She’s with Kate to discover the new neighbors, but, unlike Kate, gives them the benefit of doubt.

• LESTER SMITH (Lead/30’s-40’s): A controlling husband who forces his wife to lie about suffering from mutism. His true character is revealed throughout the film.

• JESS SMITH (Supporting/30’s-40’s): Lester’s manipulated wife.

• ASHLEY SMITH (Supporting/8-12 years old): The Smiths’ daughter, who shows signs of physiological abuse.

THE DIRECTOR
Director: Cobi Noblin
 = cnoblin@watkins.edu
Union / Non-Union: SAG-AFTRA Signatory or Non Union
Production Type: Student (Production II) With Dialogue
Project length: 12 minutes
Shooting Location: Watkins and Centennial Park
Shoot Dates: March 11-13
Compensation:  No Pay, DVD copy, digital file and meals.

SYNOPSIS: A 12-year-old-boy attempts to make the greatest film ever made. Using his father’s clout, he directs two actors and his professional crew deeper and deeper into one of the worst films ever made.

CHARACTERS:
• CHRISTIAN (Lead): A 12-year-old daddy’s boy whose father paid for him to make a science fiction film. He’s impatient, angry, and determined to have his way no matter what. He’s never made a film in his life but he already knows he’s the greatest director of all time.

• JOEY (Supporting/young-20s): Camera assistant who wants to make a film of his own. He’s quiet, humble, and good-hearted.

• STACY (Supporting/mid-20s): Smart, talented, stern, and caring, she was conned into being assistant director for Christian’s film. She wants to make sure her crew is treated right and that the film gets made, even if she upsets Christian along the way.

• MARK (Supporting/mid-30s): Director of photography who works with Stacy whenever he can. They’ve built a good working relationship and he doesn’t want to abandon her on this little boy’s film. He’s reserved, focused, and knows how to hold his tongue.

• LAUREN (Supporting): A young actress trying to make it in the movies. Christian’s father promised her a role in a real film if she would do this for his son.

• TOMMY (Supporting): A young actor who was also conned into doing the film.

• KELLY (Supporting): Joey’s nice girlfriend; she’s a dental assistant.

• HOMELESS MAN (Supporting): He’s there for the free food.

• SOUND MIXER, BOOM OP and GRIPS (Supporting): Crew members on Christian’s film

• DAD (Supporting): Christian’s elderly father, a powerful film producer with some directing talent of his own.

AIN’T NO LIGHT BUT JUSTICE
Director: Jason Harper = jcharper@watkins.edu
SAG-AFTRA Signatory
Production Type: Student Production IV
Project length: Short Film (20 minutes)
Shooting Location: Davidson County, Wilson County
Shoot Dates: TBD
Compensation: SAG-AFTRA deferred payment. DVD copy, digital file and meals.

SYNOPSIS: Jacey, unable to hold down a job, is indebted to her landlord, Roy. Roy extorts sexual favors from her as she looks to God for guidance. Jacey’s son Harris discovers what is going on and decides to take matters into his own hands, for better or worse.

CHARACTERS:
• JACEY MILLS (Lead/mid 30’s-40’s): A short, frail woman. She is unlucky, mousy, and meek. She is also devoutly religious, and her only concern is her children’s well being. Her religious devotion remains unwavering, even as she descends into a hellish nightmare. [CASTING NOTE: Simulated sex and partial nudity scripted. Director is willing to discuss with actress.]

• HARRIS MILLS (Lead/18-early 20’s): Jacey’s older son, and an average looking young man. As his religious beliefs crash down around him, he takes on a cynical view of the world and is unafraid to speak his mind. Seeing his mother being taken advantage of, his subservience to her shatters as he steps up to take care of the problem himself.

• ROY JOHNSON (Lead/30’s-50’s): Apart from not caring about his appearance, he is a fairly attractive and charismatic man. These characteristics mask the evil inside of him. [CASTING NOTE: Simulated sex and partial nudity scripted. Director is willing to discuss with actor.]

• JOEL MILLS (Supporting/8-11): Jacey’s younger son. A happy, innocent child untouched by his poor circumstances. [CASTING NOTE: Joel is not in any of the scenes that involve adult content.]

• BROTHER JIM (Supporting/40’s-60’s): A boisterous Southern Baptist preacher.

• WAREHOUSE MANAGER (Supporting/40’s-60’s): A regular Joe.

• JACEY’S BOSS (Supporting/30’s-60’s): A thin man. He is perhaps a little nebbish for a boss.

150 FEET UP
Director: Rose Hook = rhook@watkins.edu
SAG-AFTRA Signatory or Non Union
Production Type: Student (Production III) With Dialogue
Project length: 7 pages
Shooting Location: Nashville
Shoot Dates: March 19-21
Compensation: SAG-AFTRA deferred payment plus DVD copy, digital file and meals. or No Pay, DVD copy, digital file and meals.

SYNOPSIS: A young woman finds herself on a rooftop, contemplating suicide, while a police officer tries to talk her down.

CHARACTERS:
• LILY (Lead): A young woman in her late teens to early twenties who struggles with depression due to the emotional abuse suffered at the hands of her mother.

• JENSON (Lead): A mid-twenties to early thirties police officer who meets Lily on the rooftop. He is charming and seemingly lighthearted, doing his best to talk Lily down.

• MOTHER (Supporting): Lily’s mother, in her forties to fifties, who resents her daughter. Some profanity.

‘TIL NEXT TIME
Director: Krista Gail = khill@watkins.edu
SAG-AFTRA Signatory or Non Union
Production Type: Student Film (Production III) With Dialogue
Project length: 25-30 Minutes
Shooting Location: Nashville
Shoot Dates: March 4-6
Compensation: SAG-AFTRA deferred payment, DVD copy, digital file and meals.

SYNOPSIS: A troubled teenager crosses paths with a teacher who is determined to bring out her full potential.

CHARACTERS:
• MARIE (Lead/16): A disgruntled teenage blogger who has difficulties adapting to a new environment until an unlikely individual makes her way into Marie’s life.

• MRS. GIBSON (Lead/late 20’s): An English Teacher who cares for her students; she struggles to get through to one in particular, eventually making that student realize her true potential.

• MARIE’S MOM (Character/late 30s): Marie’s unstable mother who is always the bearer of bad news to Marie.

• STACY (Character/16): Captain of the Writing Club. NOT AUDITIONING. E-MAIL OR SIGN-UP IF INTERESTED.

• TEENAGERS (Extras): E-MAIL OR SIGN-UP AT TABLE IF INTERESTED.

TRICKS
Director: Ashlee Flint = aflint@watkins.edu
SAG-AFTRA Signatory or Non Union
Production Type: Student (Production II) With Dialogue
Project Length: 10 minutes
Shooting Location: Nashville
Shoot Dates: March 25-27
Compensation: SAG-AFTRA differed payment plus DVD copy, digital file and meals OR No Pay, DVD Copy, digital file and meals.

SYNOPSIS: Phillip Howell is a man in his late-twenties who has recently lost his job. Phillip has been keeping his unemployment from his best friend, Mark. Unaware that Phillip is holding back from doing things simply because he cannot afford to, Mark gets aggravated with Phillip and encourages him to get a hobby. This gives Phillip the idea to take up magic, something he loved as a child, and work to make money doing street magic to pay his rent.

CHARACTERS:
• PHILLIP HOWELL (Lead): A simple man in his late twenties. He spends most of his time at home, seeing as he can’t afford to do much else. He is an organized man, used to sticking to the plan. When he loses his job he reminisces on his childhood dreams and takes a crack at street magic to pay his bills.

• MARK (Supporting): Mark, Phillip’s best friend, is in his late twenties. He is a believer in tough love, and he will do some unusual things to help his friends.

• LAINEY: An attractive girl in her twenties. She is an acquaintance of Mark.

THE RESTAURANT
Director: Jennifer Hartsel = jhartsel@watkins.edu
SAG-AFTRA Signatory or Non Union
Production Type: Student Production II With Dialogue
Project length: Approx. 10 minutes
Shooting Location: Nashville area
Shoot Dates: March 18-20
Compensation: SAG-AFTRA deferred payment plus DVD copy, digital file and meals.

SYNOPSIS: Inspired by The Office. This is a quirky comedy, with Marty as the general manager of an Italian restaurant. After a new CEO takes charge, Marty resists conforming to new company policies; Rebecca, the regional director, tries to get him to comply. Meanwhile, the restaurant runs as usual with zany servers and unusual happenings. This film contains some language and crude humor.

CHARACTERS:
• MARTY (Leads/30s): A General Manager of an Italian restaurant chain. He’s a people pleaser and wants to be people’s friend, but he’s also stubborn.

• REBECCA (Leads/30s): The Regional Director of the area Marty is in.She feels the pressure of the new CEO as she tries to get Marty to make the necessary changes to the restaurant. She is very short with Marty, who has some odd quirks.

• TAMMY (Supporting/30s): A decent server, but not very emotionally invested in the restaurant.

• TINA (Supporting/20s): A server who’s awkward, klutzy and not very restaurant savvy.

• SHAWN (Supporting/30s): A gung-ho server who’s annoyingly enthusiastic with his job. His fellow servers don’t like him.

• RON (Supporting/20s): A server who doesn’t follow the rules or care about the restaurant’s guests.

• DAVE (Supporting/30s): A health inspector checking the restaurant.

DAMAGE CONTROL
Director: Ben Parsons = bparsons@watkins.edu
SAG-AFTRA signatory or Non-Union
Production Type: Student Production II with Dialogue
Project Length: 15 minutes
Shooting Location: Nashville
Shooting Dates: February 26-28
Compensation: No pay/SAG-AFTRA deferred payment, digital file, DVD copy and meals.

SYNOPSIS: David Dunkle, a young Poli Sci major in Ohio, swims through murky moral waters when thrust in the middle of an important scandal while interviewing for a campaign internship.

CHARACTERS:
• DAVID DUNKLE (Lead): A college student; in his early 20s. David goes for an interview on the Kendrick campaign but faces an ethical dilemma when Kendrick posts an insensitive message on his website. David must decide whether to stick by him or sabotage the already weakened campaign so David’s preferred candidate can triumph.

• QUENTIN QUALLS (Lead): An employee of the Independent Congressional Campaign Committee; in his mid-30s. Quentin has mixed feelings about his candidate but wants him to succeed in order to move up the corporate ladder.

• LARRY LYMAN (Lead): A litigator at Williams Bolling and David’s lawyer; in his mid-50s. Friends with David’s father, Larry worries that he will lose this relationship if he cannot help clear David’s name in the lawsuit.

NO RUSSIAN (Tentative)
Director: Andrew Furris = andrewfurris@gmail.com
Union / Non-Union: Either
Production Type: Student Production II With Dialogue
Project length: 10-12 minutes
Shooting Location: Nashville
Shoot Dates: March 5-6
Compensation: SAG-AFTRA deferred payment plus DVD copy, digital file and meals

SYNOPSIS: A psychiatrist’s best friend’s brother is in town. He might be crazy; he might be dangerous. The psychiatrist senses the perfect opportunity to test a theory of his and, for reasons he deems appropriate, decides to kill his friend’s brother to stop him from causing harm to anyone else. In a twist ending, it turns out that the psychiatrist is not in control, but instead his best friend is the crazy one. Some strong language.

CHARACTERS:
• HECTOR LAMBE (Lead): A proud and successful independent psychiatrist in his mid-30s. He is not smug but feels that his job is more important than others and believes that he has the right to make decisions for the greater good.

• JULIUS BIGGS (Lead): A teacher in his late-20s to early-30s. He seems very polite and understanding, an ideal teacher on the outside. Deep down he is self-indulgent, obsessive, and also a curious individual. He wants to appear crass, but is actually very intelligent. Vulnerable looking on the outside, but no pushover.

• GARRY BIGGS (Supporting): Younger brother of Julius Biggs by a few years. Deemed unstable and inept at a young age. He is perfectly normal; however, his whole life he’s been framed for the things his older brother has been doing.

• PATIENT (Supporting): A confused man/woman trying to cope with his/her situation that is eerily similar to that of the main characters. He/she is mid to late 20s.

DEAD AND DYING
Director: Eric Dudley = edudley@watkins.edu
SAG-AFTRA Signatory
Production Type: Student Production IV
Project length: Short Film, roughly 20 minutes
Shooting Location: Nashville
Shoot Dates: February 26-28 and/or March 4-6
Compensation: SAG-AFTRA deferred payment. DVD copy, digital file and meals.

SYNOPSIS: A young man attempts suicide and fails, killing a man in the process. With the help of a concerned defense attorney, he takes steps to find the meaning in his life before he is forced to face the consequences of his actions.

CHARACTERS:
• DAVID CARTER (Lead/early 20’s): A young man facing a personal crisis. He begins the film as a kid who is lost and trying to find any way out; as the film progresses, he becomes more aware that there are people who genuinely care about him, and learns to care about himself as a result.

• BEN DAVIES (Lead/mid 20’s to mid 30’s): An up-and-coming defense attorney with a smile to share. He is very hard to put down, and will always try to find the best in a situation, no matter how dim.

• GERALD DAGMUND (Supporting/late 30’s to mid 50’s): An older gentleman who directs the conversation of the depression support group that David joins. He is a kind man who genuinely cares about every person who walks through the door.

• LUCY TURNPIKE (Supporting/20’s): A woman David meets in the support group. She has similar issues to David but has a tendency to retreat into herself when someone disagrees with her.

• SAM (Supporting): Another member of the support group.

• TYLER (Supporting): Another member of the support group.

• JAMES (Supporting): Another member of the support group.

THE VOID
Director: Noel Costill = ncostill@watkins.edu
Non-Union
Production Type: Student Production IV
Project length: Short Film (20 minutes)
Shooting Location: Nashville
Shoot Dates: March 12-14 & 18-21
Compensation: DVD copy and meals

SYNOPSIS: Two years ago an anomaly appeared in space in our solar system. Black and planet-sized, the Void, as it has come to be known, rises and sets each day. Many people believe it is the end of the world, but Declan believes there is more to it. His recurring dreams of a strange place with stranger characters seem to have a connection to the mystery in the sky, and to Declan himself. One day, the anomaly begins to move closer to Earth and Declan begins to realize the true meaning and purpose behind the Void.

CHARACTERS:
• DECLAN HALE (Lead): A homeless young man, 20s-30s, has had dreams of the Void since before it arrived. He struggles to survive after a tsunami took away everything he has, including his family. While he moves from place to place the recurring dreams of characters begin to reveal more about the anomaly. He becomes more and more obsessed with his dreams, and believes the characters within them hold the answers to what the Void is and what effect it will have on our planet.

• BEN SHEPHERD (Lead): An Astronomy professor, 40s-60s, who takes in his former student, now homeless friend Declan, and lets him stay in his observatory. Ben acts as Declan’s mentor and wants to help him get back on his feet. He has an intelligent, open mind; part of him believes Declan has a connection with the Void.

• KI VALA (Lead): A young woman, 18-30s. After her only companion, Teno, sacrifices himself for a higher purpose, Ki must survive in a harsh world. She is chased by beasts and scavenges for food. She lives in Declan’s dreams, and is a complete mystery. The only company she has is a black blade left to her by Teno.

• NEWS ANCHORS (Supporting, 20s-60): Charismatic.

Film School’s Fall 2015 Winners Announced

Posted on: December 8th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

Congratulations to these winners from the Film School’s Fall 2015 screenings!

 

Production One

Jen Hartsel
Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best Picture for Into the Darkness

Ashlee Flint
Best Cinematographer for Into the Darkness

Cobi Noblin
Best Sound Design and Best Use of Music and Score for his film Folly of Man

Andrew Furris
Best Editing and Best Production Design for his film Snapshot

Peyton Christian
Best Actress for Clementine and Joe (directed by Benjamin Parsons)

Sark Asadourian
Best Actor for Into the Darkness

Production Two and Production Three

Micah Atkinson
Best Picture, Best Editing and Best Production Design for Lunch Letters

Josh Kugler
Best Cinematography for Lunch Letters

Lindsey Shope
Best Actress for Emileigh Potter’s The Finer Things

Alison Goedde
Best Score/Best Use of Music for her film Fluorescent

Jason Harper
Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best Sound Design for Pillow Talk

Collier Goodlett
Best Actor for Pillow Talk

Van Gogh image

Jury Award
to Emma Holyfield‘s animated film,
Van Gogh’s Left Ear

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Production Four

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Click to enlarge poster

The Gathering Place, written and directed by Emma Nitz

Best Cinematography
Best Sound Design
Best Actress to Taylor Mattingly
Best Supporting Actress to Suzanna Devereaux

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Click to enlarge poster

Click to enlarge poster

Moscow Station, written and directed by Alexander Mattingly

Best Picture
Best Screenplay
Best Production Design
Best Actor to Jeremy Childs
Best Supporting Actor to Bill Feehely

Note: Results were tied between the two films for Best Score/Use of Music and Best Editing.

Film School Screens Fall 2015 Projects December 7-9

Posted on: November 24th, 2015 by Caroline Davis

The Film School presents its Fall 2015 final projects from December 7-9 in the Watkins Theater, with more than 20 narrative and experimental projects from four production classes. The screenings are free and the public is invited.  Parking is free in the campus lot.

Watkins Fall 2015 Student Screenings

Monday, December 7, starting at 7 p.m. = Production One, with 6 films (90 min.)

Tuesday, December 8, starting at 6:15 p.m. = Production Two and Three, with 10 films (3.25 hours)

Wednesday, December 9, starting at 7 p.m. = Production Four, with 2 films (90 min.)

Production One, 12/7 

HOPE(LESS) – Director: D. Erik Malone

Into the Darkness – Director: Jen Hartsel

Faceless – Director: Ashlee Flint

Folly of Man – Director: Cobi Noblin

Clementine and Joe – Director: Benjamin Parsons

Snapshot – Director: Andrew Furris

Meet the Directors follows

Production Two & Production Three, 12/8

Welcome at 6:15 p.m.

Micah Atkinson – Lunch Letters (13 min)

Alison Goedde – Fluorescent (18 min)

Hayley Montague – Anonymous (20 min)

S.T. Davis – Willfully Ignorant, Dangerously Stupid (20 min)

Roxanne Nawrot – Marked (15 min)

Emma Holyfield – Van Gogh’s Left Ear (3 min)

15-minute break at 8:05 p.m.

Emileigh Potter – The Finer Things (17 min)

Angel Brewer – Syrup and Salvation (15 min)

Carter Luckfield – Lost in the Supermarket (13 min)

Derek Estes – Script on the Brain (16 min)

Jason Harper – Pillow Talk (21 min)

Meet the Directors with Q&A at 9:45 p.m., followed by Awards Presentation at 10:15 p.m.

Production Four, 12/9 

Moscow Station – Director: Alexander Mattingly

The Gathering Place – Director: Emma Nitz

About the Program

The Film School  is distinguished by a film curriculum that explores the artistic, technical and business aspects of independent filmmaking. With a focus on dramatic narrative film, the Film School helps students find their personal voice and style and helps them incorporate these factors into their narrative work.

All film students take film courses their first year of study and begin production within their second year, depending on their program of study. Production courses are small, allowing for faculty mentoring and advising and close collaboration with colleagues.

The Film School offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree (BFA) in Film with concentration in Producing, Directing, Screenwriting, Cinematography and Editing. In addition to the film curriculum, students are required to complete a Visual Arts Core of studies and a General Education Core, designed to create a program for a well-rounded filmmaker and visual artist.

Tournées Film Festival Debuts at Watkins October 15

Posted on: October 5th, 2015 by Caroline Davis
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Click to enlarge poster

Watkins has been selected as a participant in the 20th edition of Tournées Film Festival, offering a wide variety of films, from the popular to the experimental, that represent the best of French cinema distributed in the U.S. A showcase of established and emerging talents, the Tournées Film Festival reflects the diversity and the richness of French cinema through various genres — fiction, documentary, animation and repertory films — giving participants the opportunity to expand their programming and for audiences to experience French cinema through a wider lens. Admission to the six-film series, which runs Thursday evenings, October 15—November 19, is free. Organized by Watkins’ Film School Student Council, all screenings begin at 6 p.m. in the Watkins Theater, following a brief introduction by Adjunct Faculty Amy Bertram, Ph.D., an expert in French cinema.

The Tournées Film Festival was made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., the Centre National de la Cinématographie et de l’Image Animée CNC), and SACEM’s French American Cultural Fund.

Thursdays at 6 p.m.

•  October 15: Girlhood
•  October 22: Abuse of Weakness
•  October 29: Mood Indigo
•  November 5: Timbuktu
•  November 12: The King and The Mockingbird
•  November 19: Mr. X: A Vision of Leos Carax

(Warning: Some films may contain adult content; viewer discretion is advised.)
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