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Safety Report

Posted on: September 2nd, 2016 by Steve Wilkison

CAMPUS CRIME and SECURITY FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2015

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film provides information on campus crime and security in compliance with The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act), formerly known as the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act. All incidents of security infractions are reported to designated staff members and, when appropriate, to local police. This report is updated annually by a joint effort of the Office of Facilities and the Office of Student Life.

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film sits on 13 acres in the MetroCenter area of Nashville, Tennessee. This urban neighborhood features many restaurants as well as a post office and city library directly across from campus. The campus borders a small city lake with a view of the Tennessee Titans training field and hosts an abundance of wildlife. The main academic building is a repurposed 64,995 sq ft multiplex cinema located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Blvd. Residence halls are just behind the main academic building and accessible via footbridge from the student center. Hawkins and Turner Halls each feature 12 fourbedroom, twobath apartments of roughly 1,200 sq ft each with a full kitchen, combination living and dining room, and laundry. During 2014, Watkins leased additional offcampus apartments at 377 Athens Way, Nashville, TN 37228 (.5 miles from the main academic building).

FEDERAL STATISTICAL REPORTING OBLIGATIONS

Under the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, certain College officials have a duty to report statistical information regarding sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking occurring on campus or on noncampus property controlled or utilized by the College or students. Personally identifiable information is not included, but information must be provided to the Director of Facilities regarding the nature of the incident, the date it occurred, and its general location (e.g., on or offcampus, in residential housing, or in the surrounding area) for publication in the Annual Security Report. This report helps to provide the community with a clear picture of the extent and nature of campus crime and security measures on campus, to ensure greater community safety.

Mandated federal reporters, known as Campus Security Authorities, include:. the Office of Student Life. the Title IX Coordinator. Residential Education staff (including Residential Advisers). advisers to student organizations. the Director of Facilities and anyone else with significant responsibility for student and campus activities.

FEDERAL TIMELY WARNING REPORTING OBLIGATIONS

Under the Clery Act, Facilities must also issue timely warnings with respect to crimes that pose a serious or continuing threat of bodily harm or danger to members of the campus community. The victim’s name will never be disclosed and Watkins will make every effort to ensure that any other identifying information is not disclosed, while still providing enough information for community members to make safety decisions in light of the danger.

CAMPUS SECURITY AUTHORITIES

The Director of Facilities, who is in charge of safety and security, has primary oversight of Watkins’ security policies and implementation. Additionally, Watkins contracts with an independent security firm to provide afterhours security officers. These officers are primarily for the protection of the students. they will intervene to prevent imminent danger but have no arrest authority.

All Watkins community members are encouraged to report suspicious activity, possible crimes, or concerns to the Front Desk which is staffed either by the Daytime Facilities Manager, Assistant Desk Manager, a Student Worker, or security personnel. These reports will be maintained as confidential to the extent that it is appropriate or possible. Anonymous reports can also be made through an online reporting form at http://report.watkins.edu from campus computers or campus wifi. Additionally, all Watkins community members are encouraged to promptly report any suspicious activity or crimes to the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department at 615.862.8600 for nonemergencies. In an emergency, always call 911.

In addition to the dedicated security personnel, there are other individuals with significant responsibility for community safety by virtue of their job duties. These individuals include:

  • Director of Student Life
  • Director of Facilities
  • Vice President for Academic Affairs
  • Vice President for Finance and Operations

Alleged crimes or violations reported to these authorities are then reported to the Daytime Facilities Manager. It is possible that reports may originally be made to a desk worker, resident advisor, and/or faculty advisor. However, those reports must immediately be passed on to someone on the list above so they may be investigated and necessary additional preventative measures may be implemented to prevent others from being victimized. The campus maintains 75 security cameras that allow Front Desk security staff to monitor the academic building and the entrances to the residence halls. These cameras are monitored around the clock and images are kept for at least 30 days.

ACCESS TO CAMPUS

Access to the campus building during school hours is for students, faculty, and administration only. All students, faculty, and staff are required to carry their Watkins photo ID on their person at all times, and produce it up request. Friends or relatives are not permitted in the classrooms or studios while classes are in session. however, visiting parents and guests may tour the school with their student but must first register with the Front Desk. When classes are not in session, guests are permitted and must register with the Front Desk. Students must be with visitors at all time and the student will be held responsible for the actions of their guests. Watkins reserves the right to deny anyone access to the campus for any reason without explanation.

Keys to residence hall apartments and bedrooms are issued to residents upon checkin. Residents may not duplicate keys. If a key is lost or not returned when an apartment is vacated, the lock may be changed. Lost keys must be reported to the Housing Operations Manager immediately. Keys are not to be given to guests or visitors.

TIMELY WARNINGS

Watkins has a written timely warning policy. This policy is also readily available in the Student Handbook and in the Faculty/Staff Operations Manual. Practice indicates that timely warnings would be issued for the following events:

  • Weather events: notification is immediate and includes public address systems on campus, email to community, announcement to local news, and text messages to all students*.
  • Violent outbreaks on or around campus: notification is immediate and includes public address systems on campus, email to community, and text messages to all students*.
  • Fire, gas leaks: notification is immediate and includes the building fire alarm and public address systems on campus. Watkins practices fire drills once a semester.
  • Unapprehended suspects for violent crime in the surrounding area: notification is within 24 hours of receiving the information and includes emails to community, fliers on campus doors, and text messages sent to all students*.
  • In the case of a threat to public health, school authorities will make a determination about the most appropriate response. Students, staff and faculty will be notified by email.

Watkins is engaged in ongoing communication with local police, which provides ready knowledge of any other event requiring a timely warning to the Watkins community.

Different offices hold responsibility for the different methods of issuing timely warnings. The Vice President for Finance and Operations has final responsibility for ensuring the appropriate methods are used and is responsible for communicating with the local news. The Daytime Facilities Manager is responsible for the public address systems, emails to community, text messages, and fliers. The Director of Student Life is also responsible for emails to community and fliers. The IT Director is also responsible for emails to community, public address systems,and text alerts.

*Students, faculty and staff are strongly encouraged to sign up for Watkins Alerts, campus alerts sent via text message to those who are registered. Setting up Watkins Alerts: If you haven’t set up your mobile phone to receive Watkins Alerts, there are two ways to do it.

  1. When you change your password at password.watkins.edu, there are four sections to the change page. Go to section 2 and verify that the phone number is the number of your mobile phone. You can also update your address in this section if you have moved. Section 3 will indicate whether you are already set up for password recovery, if you aren’t, just select ‘Yes’ to send a text message and follow the directions. Section 4 indicates whether you’re set up to receive Watkins Alerts. Select ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ to enable or disable this feature.
  2. To change your alert and password recovery settings without changing your password go to alert.watkins.edu and log in. You may change your mobile phone number, and the page indicates whether you are signed up for password recovery and Watkins Alerts.

In all cases, the determination is made in the following line of authority per the Operational Policies and Guidelines Manual:

  • President and/or the Director of Facilities
  • Vice President for Finance and Operations
  • VicePresidentforAcademicAffairs
  • VicePresidentforInstitutionalAdvancement
  • Director of Student Life
  • Daytime Facilities Manager
  • Business Manager
  • Other Administrative Officer
  • Assistant Desk Manager
  • Security Officer
  • Department Chair or Program Director
  • Fulltime Faculty Member

DAILY CRIME LOG

Watkins maintains a daily crime log at the Front Desk of reported incidents. This log contains a description of any reported incident, including the nature of the incident, the date and time, the general location, and the persons involved to the extent that they can be identified. This log also notes whether local authorities

were involved as well. Currently, the disposition of the complaint is not maintained as part of this record, though it is maintained as part of students’ disciplinary records, when applicable. The Daytime Facilities Manager is responsible for the maintenance of this log, which is updated as incidents are reported. It is available for the public to view upon request.

PREVENTION

Student orientation each semester promotes student safety, incorporated into parent panels and the Student Life session. The material communicated in those sessions mirrors that of the student handbook:

  • The MetroCenter complex has its own mobile security force that patrols the area.
  • In addition, the campus is patrolled by the Metro Police and college officials who have a positive working relationship with the patrolling Metro officers.
  • Watkins has an internal and external electronic security system and surveillance system. When the system indicates a potential problem, a security company is automatically called and the company calls the Metro police.
  • A Front Desk worker can assist students to their cars and provides other security services as needed.
  • During late night hours, Watkins contracts an independent security company whose security officers patrol the parking lot, the main academic building, and the residence halls and also assist people to their cars.
  • Security is further enhanced with parking lot lights and floodlights from the top of the building.
  • To further enhance security, Watkins College of Art, Design & Film officials have adopted the risk reduction procedures listed below:
  • Students, faculty, staff, and visitors must enter and leave the main academic building at the front doors where the reception desk is staffed by persons who monitor all those who come and go. At no time should anyone use the emergency exit doors unless there is an emergency, as these doors are alarmed. Other nonemergency doors besides the front doors may be used only in special, approved circumstances and only by designated college staff. For questions about disarming other doors, please see the Front Desk staff.
  • No one should be in the main academic building after officially posted business hours unless he or she has special permission from the President or his or her official designee.
  • In the evenings, everyone should avoid walking alone to a parked car.
  • Everyone should walk with a companion or request a security officer escort. Students living on campus are also advised to do the same.
  • Cars should be parked directly near buildings and should be locked at all times. Absolutely nothing of value should be left in plain view inside a car.
  • Any suspicious activity or any person who does not appear to have reason to be at the college should be reported immediately to the security officer, Front Desk worker, or other appropriate college official.
  • Every apparent crime should be reported immediately to the security officer, Front Desk worker, or other appropriate college official. Anonymous reports of crime may also be submitted through report.watkins.edu from campus computers or the campus wifi.
  • It is advisable that blinds on the windows in the main academic building be closed in the evenings and should remain closed until the following morning. Students living in oncampus residence halls are also strongly encouraged to do the same.
  • Due to liability issues, individuals should never utilize the lake property via any means of watercraft or swimming.

An officer from the North Precinct presents general safety workshops to residence life and facilities staff annually. One allresident meeting is held each semester with oncampus residents to discuss safety procedures that are specific to the residence halls, including reporting to Resident Advisors, door safety, and residence halls policies and procedures. Additional communication and programming occurs as is deemed necessary by the Campus Security Committee.

The Tennessee Sexual Offender Registry is available at www.tbi.state.tn.us/sex_ofender_reg/sex_ofender_reg.shtml The Tennessee Bureau of Investigations Sexual Offender Registry Hotline is (888) 8374170

PROGRAMMING FOR CAMPUS SAFETY and AWARENESS

Watkins College of Art, Design, & Film places emphasis on programming and activities designed to educated students about personal safety, community safety, health, responsibility. Students are also provided opportunities of information intended to prevent rape, acquaintance rape, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and other forms of powerbased personal violence before it occurs.

January PowerBased Violence and Alcohol Awareness All new students (firstyear and transfer) must complete online training modules designed to educated students about powerbased personal violence and alcohol awareness. Each module consists of a series of short videos. Students are pre and posted tested on the materials and expected to earn a “passing” grade in order for the training to be determined complete. The power based violence module addresses sexual assault, intimate partner violence, stalking, consent, bystander intervention and healthy relationships. The alcohol awareness module addresses effects of alcohol, risky behavior, and responsible drinking habits. Both modules provide resources for additional information.
New Student Orientation All new students (firstyear and transfer) participate in New Student Orientation where campus policies, safety, and security is reviewed.
March Campus Safety Severe Weather Safety event
April Sexual Assault Awareness Participation in the annual Sexual Assault Center Awareness Walk and event for Sexual Assault Awareness Month.
August Power-Based Violence and Alcohol Awareness All new students (firstyear and transfer) must complete online training modules designed to educated students about powerbased personal violence and alcohol awareness. Each module consists of a series of short videos. Students are pre and posted tested on the materials and expected to earn a “passing” grade in order for the training to be determined complete. The power based violence module addresses sexual assault, intimate partner violence, stalking, consent, bystander intervention and healthy relationships. The alcohol awareness module addresses effects of alcohol, risky behavior, and responsible drinking habits. Both modules provide resources for additional information.
New Student Orientation All new students (firstyear and transfer) participate in New Student Orientation where campus policies, safety, and security is reviewed.
September National Campus Safety Awareness Month Alcohol and Sexual Violence Awareness event Faculty Staff Meeting where campus policies, safety, and security is reviewed.
October Fire Safety Awareness Information about Fire Safety for National Fire Prevention Month
November Domestic Violence Awareness Month Positive Relationships event

CAMPUS POLICIES

All Watkins College of Art, Design & Film policies can be found in either the Student Handbook, College Catalog, or the Operational Policies and Guidelines Manual.

ALCOHOL and OTHER DRUGS

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film prohibits the unlawful use, sale, dispensing, possession, or manufacture of illicit drugs and alcohol by students, their guests, and employees on its property, as any part of its activities, or while engaged in Watkins Business. Behavior in violation of this policy subjects students, employees, and visitors to unacceptable safety risks, and undermines Watkins’ ability to operate effectively and efficiently. Violation of the drug and alcohol policy will result in disciplinary sanctions, which may include expulsion and referral for prosecution under state and federal law.

Watkins strictly prohibits the use, sale, dispensing, possession, or manufacture of alcoholic beverages consistent with federal and state regulations that state that individuals under the age of 21 are not permitted to consume alcoholic beverages. Students 21 years of age and older may possess and consume alcoholic beverages at sanctioned oncampus events where alcohol is served by a licensed bartender following college policies and only within the immediate vicinity of the event. Alcohol possession and consumption by students and their guests is not permitted within the academic building, or at any location on campus property at any other time. Students 21 years of age and older may also consume alcohol in oncampus housing within the rooms and apartments of students who are legal drinking age, only if all occupants are of legal drinking age. Students may not consume alcohol during class meetings, nor are they permitted arrive to class intoxicated. No student, regardless of age, may possess hard liquor anywhere on campus. Hard liquor, defined by this policy as having an alcohol content of 18 percent or more alcohol by volume, that is found by staff in campus residences or on property will be confiscated. Generally, this excludes beer, malt beverages, wine, and hard liquor mixes, however students who are of legal drinking age permitted to have alcohol are responsible for monitoring the alcohol content of any alcohol in their possession. Distilled spirits of any kind are considered hard alcohol. Underage students present in a residential room or apartment where alcohol is being consumed will be subject to disciplinary action, as will their hosts. Empty alcohol bottles can be considered evidence of consumption, and therefore constitute a policy violation. Empty hard alcohol bottles are not permitted anywhere on campus, and empty beer, wine, etc. bottles should be limited to the ofage student’s room, or disposed of in the appropriate receptacles. Any students using such materials for class artwork must receive written approval from the course instructor prior to obtaining and using such materials on campus. Students residing in oncampus housing must also receive prior written permission to house such items from the Residence Life Coordinator. Students found to be in possession of alcohol outside of the above are in serious violation of the alcohol policy and are subject to disciplinary procedures that can lead to suspension. there is zero tolerance for such violations.

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film provides a drugfree learning environment. The use, sale, dispensing, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs on the property of Watkins or when engaged in the performance of official Watkins business offcampus, is expressly prohibited. Such behavior is not only illegal. it also harms both the individual and the learning environment. Watkins students are responsible for knowing and complying with all applicable federal, state, and local laws that make it a crime to possess, sell, or manufacture those drugs considered to be controlled substances by the federal government and/or the State of Tennessee. The presence of drug paraphernalia and/or residue indicates the use of illegal drugs and students will be dealt with according to Watkins policies on drug possession and use. Violators of these laws are subject to both prosecution and punishment by civil authorities and to disciplinary proceedings by the college. Penalties to be imposed by the college may range from oneday suspension to expulsion. Presentations on drug and alcohol abuse will be conducted periodically, and these sessions will be open to all students. This summary is not intended to be a reinstatement of the law nor a summary of all of the laws relating to drugs and alcoholic beverages. All members of the Watkins community are responsible for compliance with the federal and state laws governing the use or possession of drugs or alcohol.

SMOKING

Smoking, including the use of electronic cigarettes, is prohibited in all Watkins buildings. There are designated smoking areas on campus: the smoking shelter in the west parking lot and the stone table between the residence halls. Smoking outside of these areas is prohibited and may result in disciplinary sanction.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE RESOURCES

Watkins, through a contracted partnership withAGAPE, a local counseling organization, provides access to counseling for many personal issues, including but not limited to alcohol and drug abuse. Students found responsible for violations of the alcohol or drug policies above may be referred to this agency as part of the disciplinary process, depending on the severity and situation of the violation. Additionally, drug counseling, rehabilitation, and assistance programs are available through the Nashville Alcohol and Drug Council (available by telephone at 615.269.0029) or contact the Office of Student Life. Watkins provides mandatory alcohol abuse prevention each fall to all incoming students via online training modules. Watkins also provides programming and event opportunities to discuss such topics.

FIRE SAFETY

The following guidelines will help ensure the health and safety of all on campus in the event of a fire in the building. Each student and employee has the responsibility of knowing the location of the fire alarm stations, fire extinguishers and exit plans while on Watkins property. Fire extinguishers are located throughout the campus buildings and residence halls. They are to be used only in the event of a fire. Do not tamper with them. Tampering with fire alarms, extinguishers, smoke detectors and other fire equipment or pulling the fire alarm under false pretenses will be subject to swift and decisive disciplinary action, including eviction from college housing and/or legal action. Exit signs are located strategically throughout the buildings. Do not remove or tamper with any of these signs. Exit plans are posted in all offices and classrooms. Please review these drawings for your own safety. The best fire safety starts with prevention.

Watkins holds a minimum of 2 fire drills for the main building and resident halls throughout the year. These are unannounced drills. Fire training will be conducted during orientation and/or Fire Safety month with the Metro Nashville Fire Marshal’s office.

Items that have been determined to be a fire safety hazard are prohibited in Watkins residences halls.

This includes, but is not limited to the use and/or storage of the following items:

Use of multiple electrical adapters, appliances with frayed cords or ungrounded electrical appliances, halogen lamps, string lights or tube lights, incendiary items (candles or anything requiring an open flame to operate), incense, coals and other combustible chemicals and flammable liquids (lighter fluid, kerosene, engine fluid, solvents, gasoline and diesel fuel), deep fryers, fog and smoke machines (within buildings), bbq grills, electric skillets, charcoal and propane burners/grills, and NuWave ovens and cooktops.

Fire Alarm Procedure for All Campus Buildings

  1. If you see a fire in the building:
    1. Immediately sound the building alarm by activating pull station.
    2. Dial 911 and give exact location of fire if known.
    3. If you can do so safely, use the fire extinguisher to put out small fires (trash basket or smaller). If in doubt…GET OUT.. Evacuate immediately.
  2. If you hear the fire alarm:
    1. Do not assume it is only a drill.
    2. Turn on room lights and close doors as you leave. Touch metal door handles lightly with back of your hand to check for heat.
    3. If smoke is in air, use wet cloth to breathe through and stay close to the floor.
    4. Do not go out of your way to collect personal belongings.
    5. Once outside of the building proceed to the west (Great Circle Rd.). parking lot. Stay clear of the buildings to allow the fire department access.
    6. Follow the instruction of the person in charge of managing the emergency (director of facilities, etc.).
    7. Do not return to or reenter the building until instructed to do so by the fire department or the fire officer.
  3. If someone is on fire:
    1. Don’t panic. Serious injury can be avoided if the flames are extinguished quickly.
    2. Prevent the person from running, which fans the flames and takes him/her farther from help.
    3. Get the person on the ground and roll her/him over and over to smother the flames. Use a blanket if one is available.

Fire Alarm Procedure for Residence Hall Residents

  1. If you see a fire in the building:
    1. Go to the nearest pull station and pull the fire alarm. The pull station locations are located in the breezeway on each floor.
    2. Dial 911 and give exact location of fire if known.
    3. Do not try to retrieve items in other parts of the building.
    4. If you can do so safely use fire extinguisher to put out small fires (trash basket or smaller). If in doubt…GET OUT.
    5. Evacuate the building.
    6. Report the fire to the highest administrative person present i.e., RA or director of student life, etc. a. Follow all procedures below..
  2. If you hear the fire alarm in the building:
    1. Do not assume it is only a drill.
    2. Locate all residents with whom you reside and alert them.
    3. Put on shoes and a coat.
    4. Turn on ceiling lights and close windows and room doors.
    5. Evacuate immediately. Touch metal door handles lightly with back of your hand to check for heat. If it is hot find an alternative exit.
    6. If trapped put wet towels at bottom of door. Open a window a small amount and wave sheet so fire department can easily locate you.
    7. If smoke is in air, use wet cloth to breathe through and stay close to floor. Crawl to exit.
    8. Once outside of the building meet away from the building in the east parking lot (the larger lot). Stay clear of the buildings to allow firefighters access. Once outside students should assemble by apartment (meaning, all residents from room 101 should meet together). It will be important to be able to account for all residents.
    9. Do not go to the main academic building unless instructed to do so by the person in charge of managing the emergency (likely an RA, the director of student life, or the director of facilities.
    10. Follow the instructions of the person in charge of the emergency for all other needs.
    11. Do not return to or enter the building until instructed to do so by the fire department or fire officer.

Fire Officers

The facilities director or the assistant facilities director shall act as fire officer. In his/her absence the order of authority is as follows:

  1. vice president for finance and operations
  2. vice president for academic affairs
  3. vice president for institutional advancement
  4. director of admissions
  5. director of student life
  6. department chair or program director
  7. fulltime faculty member
  8. other administrative officer
  9. department chair or program director
  10. fulltime faculty member
  • Upon activation of the alarm system the fire officer will report to the Fire Control Point (west parking lot, next to Great Circle Rd.). Members of the staff and faculty should check swiftly that their area is clear of all students, faculty and staff as they evacuate. No one is expected to put themselves in danger.
  • If safe, the fire officer will appoint two members of the staff to investigate the cause of the alarm activation. Those dispatched must carry appropriate fire extinguishers for their own protection.
  • If a fire is detected the appointed two member of the staff should only tackle the fire if it is safe to do so, i.e., it is no larger than a trash basket.
  • If found to be a false alarm, the fire officer will contact ADS at (6152694448) to advise them of the revised situation so that the emergency can be downgraded.
  • The fire officer will remain at the Fire Control Point (west parking lot, next to Great Circle Rd.) until all staff and students have reentered the building, and will evaluate the evacuation procedure.

COLLEGE LOCKDOWN

Watkins College Lockdown Information for Main Buildings and Residence Halls

Guidelines:

A campus lockdown is a procedure initiated by Watkins officials in an effort to protect the lives of students, staff and faculty. The length of time that a lockdown will last depends on the situation and how quickly it can be resolved by school officials and local law enforcement. A lockdown may be initiated for a variety of reasons, including natural disasters, criminal activity or other potential threat. Reasons for a campus lockdown include:

  • Natural disasters, such as tornado, ice storm and severe lightning
  • Criminal threats
  • Person with firearm or weapon on campus
  • Gunshots on or near campus
  • Bomb threats
  • Crime taking place on or near campus
  • Kidnapping or hostage situation
  • Hostile or threatening intruder on campus
  • Chemical spills or gas leaks

Procedures:

There are two basic procedures called for:

  • Lockdown with Warning: The threat is outside of the college buildings
  • Lockdown with Intruder: The threat is inside the buildings.

Lockdown with Warning procedures:

  • Watkins officials will order and announce “lockdown with warning” on the public address system. The announcement will be repeated several times.
  • These announcements will also be sent to all students, faculty and staff by email. Announcements will also be posted on Watkins website.
  • Remain calm. Encourage others to remain calm.
  • Bring everyone inside.
  • Enter the nearest secure place, office or classroom.
  • Lock all exterior doors.
  • Clear hallways, restrooms and other rooms that cannot be locked.
  • Pull shades. Keep away from windows and doors.
  • Do not try to help the injured. Wait for the police, etc. You will only prevent them from doing their job and increase the likelihood that you will be harmed.
  • Do not pull the fire alarm. If the alarm is activated, wait for an announcement from the PA system before taking action. Do not evacuate unless you smell smoke or are instructed to evacuate.
  • A Watkins official will announce “all clear” on the public address system.

Lockdown with Intruder procedures:

  • A Watkins official will announce “Lockdown with Intruder” on the public address system. The announcement will be repeated several times.
  • If the situation allows, these announcements will also be sent to all students, faculty and staff by email and/or
  • Immediately direct all students, faculty, staff and visitors into the nearest classroom or secure space. Classes that are outside should NOT enter the building.
  • Remain calm. Encourage others to remain calm.
  • Cease all activity.
  • Do not lock exterior doors.
  • Lock or barricade all classrooms and secure area doors.
  • Move away from windows. Turn off all lights, computers, etc.
  • Sit on the floor, under or behind desks so as to be as invisible as possible.
  • Turn off cell phone ringers and remain as silent as possible. Use texting in silent mode only.
  • Calls to 911 should be made only if specific information becomes available regarding location or conduct of the intruder.
  • Do not try to help the injured. Wait for the police, etc. You will only prevent them from doing their job and increase the likelihood that you will be harmed.
  • Do not respond to anyone at the door. Watkins officials will announce “all clear” over the PA system when it is safe to leave the rooms.
  • Do not pull the fire alarm. If alarm is activated wait for an announcement from the PA system before taking action. Do not evacuate unless you smell smoke or are instructed to evacuate.

MISSING STUDENT NOTIFICATION/ACTION POLICY

In compliance with the Missing Student Notification Policy (20 USC 1092 CSection 488 of the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008), it is the policy of the Watkins College of Art, Design & Film to actively investigate any report of a missing student currently enrolled at the College. Students have the option to provide an emergency person/number to be contacted if they are believed to be (a) missing for more than 24 hours and/or (b) in potential danger. This information should be provided on the Student Health Questionnaire upon matriculation or by contacting the Director of Student Life at any time during enrollment.

This information will only be available to authorized campus officials and law enforcement officers in furtherance of resolving the missing student’s investigation/emergency situation. Anyone who believes that a student has gone missing should report his or her concern to a Residence Advisor or the Director of Student Life. The official receiving the report should:

  1. Collect and document the name, campus address, physical description (including last known clothing), vehicle information and any contact information relative to the missing student.
  2. The last time and location the missing student was seen.
  3. The circumstances leading to the belief the student has gone missing.
  4. Any friends, other locations, or changes in routine involving the missing student.
  5. The name and contact information of the individual filing the report.

The official receiving the report will then contact the Director of Facilities, the VicePresident of Academic Affairs, and the President. An investigation will be initiated surrounding the circumstances that lead to the concern to determine the threat level to the involved missing student to include as necessary:

  1. Initiating a search on campus for the missing student to include common areas, residence halls, parking areas for his/her vehicle, or other known areas frequented by him/her.
  2. Attempting to contact the involved missing student directly through cell phones, or email/ social networking venues.
  3. Contacting known associates of the missing student.
  4. Checking the involved missing student’s room for information that might lead to his/her location.
  5. Checking the involved missing student’s campus email, phone, and cyberkey (if applicable) records for recent usage. Class schedules and instructors may also be consulted to determine the latest attendance.
  6. If the threat level determines it to be necessary and/or if the student has been missing for more than 24 hours, the Vice President of Academic Affairs will notify the student’s emergency contact. If the student is under the age of 18 and is not emancipated, the student’s parents/guardians must be notified. The Metro Nashville Police Department will be notified if the student is believed to be in potential danger and/or has been missing for more than 24 hours.

In addition to responding to a call for persons believed to be missing for more than 24 hours, Metro Nashville Police Department may be notified to assist in an investigation when:

  1. The involved missing student is less than 18 years old and is missing from his or her normal and ordinary place of residence and whose whereabouts cannot be determined.
  2. The involved missing student has a history of mental illness, or has a history of attempted suicide or recently expressed suicidal thoughts.
  3. The involved missing student may be the victim of a crime or accident.
  4. The involved missing student is missing under circumstances inconsistent with the persons normal behavior.

WEAPONS

Possession or use of firearms, explosives (including fireworks), dangerous chemicals or other dangerous weapons, or the brandishing of any weapon or any other object in a menacing or threatening manner is strictly prohibited. Weapons may be defined as any object or substance designed to inflict a wound, cause injury, or otherwise cause harm to individuals. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, all firearms, pellet guns, stun guns, paintball guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, switchblade knives, baseball bats and clubs. This includes disassembled weapons and their parts, as well as ammunition, including, but not limited to bullets and arrows. Weapons will be confiscated and the student in possession will be subject to disciplinary action and/or prosecution under state criminal codes.

Possession of or use of firearms or other dangerous weapons of any kind on the property of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film is prohibited. As prescribed by state law, signs are posted at prominent locations at the College stating the criminal penalties for violation of this prohibition. This policy does not apply to authorized law enforcement officers in the actual discharge of official duties. Absolutely no other exceptions are permitted except as authorized in writing by the President of the College.

The possession, ignition, or detonation of any object or article which could cause damage by fire or other means to persons or property, or any substances which could be considered to be and are used as fireworks, explosives, or pyrotechnics is prohibited. Any exceptions must be authorized in writing by the President of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film.

SEXUAL MISCONDUCT and POWERBASED PERSONAL VIOLENCE POLICY

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film strictly prohibits acts of Sexual Misconduct and powerbased personal violence including rape, acquaintance rape, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and other forms of powerbased personal violence.

Prevention, Education, and Training

Watkins provides several programs that address sexual misconduct and instances of powerbased personal violence, including the related issue of drug and alcohol abuse. Watkins requires mandatory online training via StudentSuccess.org for all incoming students. This information intends to educate and prevent situations of rape, acquaintance rape, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and other forms of powerbased personal violence before it occurs. The information details definitions and a clear statement that the college prohibits such acts. The program additionally provides information defining consent, options for bystander intervention, information for risk reduction, and our policies and procedures for responding to these incidents. All students are given a Student Handbook and Planner, which contains the Watkins Sexual Misconduct and Powerbased Personal Violence Policy. The policy is also made readily available on the Watkins website.

Ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns/programming events are offered throughout the year.

Watkins also provides regular and ongoing training to faculty and staff, beginning at the start of their association with the college. This training includes:

  • New staff and faculty orientation includes a discussion of nondiscrimination laws and policies.
  • The Title IX Coordinator, responsible employees, and the Director of Student Life, and others involved in responding to, investigating, or adjudicating sexual misconduct and powerbased personal violence cases receive additional training in these areas from the Sexual Assault Center.
  • Student Resident Advisor training facilitated by the Sexual Assault Center to assist with recognizing and responding to incidents of sexual misconduct or powerbased personal violence.

Immediate Assistance

Any member of the Watkins community who has experienced sexual misconduct or powerbased personal violence may seek immediate assistance from one or more of the following resources. As discussed in the “Reporting an Incident” section below, some of these resources are subject to mandatory reporting requirements. This policy indicates the level of confidentiality offered by each of the listed oncampus resources.

Law Enforcement

Metro Nashville Police Department Headquarters
200 James Robertson Parkway
Nashville, TN 37201
615-862-7400
Emergency – 911
www.police.nashville.gov

The filing of a police report or the pendency of civil or criminal proceedings does not preclude Watkins from proceeding with its investigation and determination. The investigation and determination may be delayed until the police have finished gathering evidence but generally will not wait for the conclusion of any criminal proceeding. Watkins encourages its students, faculty, and staff to report crimes to law enforcement.

NOTE: Civil or criminal proceedings are separate and distinct from internal college proceedings and they may or may not run parallel to one another. However, Watkins may be required by law to provide information in civil or criminal proceedings.

Medical Service Providers

Nashville General Hospital at Meharry Emergency Department*
1818 Albion Street
Nashville, TN 37208
615-341-4000

*In order for a sexual assault forensic examination to be admissible in Davidson County court one must have the procedure completed at Nashville General Hospital.

St. Thomas Midtown Hospital Emergency Department
2000 Church Street
Nashville, TN 37236
615-284-5555

TriStar Centennial Medical Center Emergency Department:
2300 Patterson St.
Nashville, TN 37203
615-342-1000

This list is not exhaustive, merely the nearest medical service providers to Watkins’ campus.

Resources and Support

Sexual Assault Center Hotline: 1-800-879-1999

Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic & Sexual Violence Hotline: 1-800-787-3224

YWCA Crisis and Information Line: 615-242-1199

The law enforcement agency listed above is available for emergency response, facilitating medical transport, investigating incidents of a criminal nature, referrals, and preserving evidence.

The medical service providers listed above are available for treatment of injuries, preventative treatment for sexually transmitted diseases, other health services, and consultations. Medical treatment and a forensic examination may aid in the preservation of relevant evidence. Tennessee law requires all medical personnel to report to law enforcement when a victim seeks treatment for injuries related to a violent crime, including sexual assault. Medical personnel are also required to report to law enforcement and/or Child Protective Services when a minor presents for treatment for any injury or condition that reasonably indicates it was caused by violence or abuse, including physical or sexual abuse. Medical personnel are also required to report to law enforcement and/or Adult Protective Services when certain vulnerable adults present and there is reasonable belief that they are victims of adult abuse, neglect, or exploitation.

Students can request that a Student Life representative or other advocate with whom they feel comfortable to meet them at a medical service provider, law enforcement agent, or other resource for assistance. If a Student Life representative is not on campus, for example if you need assistance outside of business hours, please notify the front desk attendant that you have an emergency and would like to reach the Director of Student Life or another Student Life representative. Students do not need to reveal any details about the emergency to the front desk attendant. they will call the Student Life representative immediately.

Immediate Priority—Preserving Evidence

To help preserve evidence, it is important for the victim not to change clothes or bedding and not take a shower, douche, or clean up until police have had a chance to gather evidence. If a victim has already changed clothes or cleaned up/showered, evidence may still be collected. Leave any clothes or bedding unfolded and undisturbed, if possible. If clothing or bedding must be moved, try to keep each item separate to prevent transfer of body fluids or other trace evidence. Do not delete or destroy any text messages, emails, voicemails, written notes, or any other documents that may be relevant.

Ongoing Assistance

The following resources are available for ongoing assistance, regardless of whether the victim chooses to make an official report or participate in an investigation or criminal process. As discussed in the “Reporting an Incident” section below, some of these resources are subject to mandatory reporting requirements.

Resources for counseling and advocacy

These resources are at noor lowcost to survivors of sexual assault:

Sexual Assault Center, www.sacenter.org
Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic & Sexual Violence, www.tncoalition.org
AGAPE Counseling, www.agapenashville.org

Interim Measures, Accommodations, and Sanctions

Where appropriate, Watkins will implement interim measures on its own initiative or in response to a request from a complainant (the alleged victim of sexual misconduct or powerbased personal violence) or respondent (the alleged perpetrator of sexual misconduct or powerbased personal violence).

Interim measures for students may include (within reason), but are not limited to:

  • access to counseling services and assistance in setting up an initial appointment.
  • “nocontact directives” (also known as stay away orders or directives to desist) issued by Student Life.
  • rescheduling of exams and assignments.
  • providing alternative course completion options.
  • changing class schedules, including the ability to transfer course sections or withdraw from a course without penalty.
  • changing work schedules, job assignments, or job locations for college employment.
  • changing residence hall assignments.
  • limiting or barring an individual’s or organization’s access to certain Watkinsowned facilities or activities.
  • interim residential expulsion of the respondent.
  • interim suspension of the respondent.
  • studentrequested leaves of absence.

NOTE: Students may also seek orders of protection, restraining orders, or other similar orders issued by a court of law and may be assisted in doing so by representatives from Student Life offices.

Interim measures for faculty and staff may include, but are not limited to:

  • access to counseling services and assistance in setting up an initial appointment.
  • changing work schedules, job assignments, or job locations.
  • limiting or barring an individual’s or organization’s access to certain Watkinsowned facilities or activities. . administrative leave.
  • Watkins-imposed leave or physical separation from individuals or locations.

Offenses and Definitions

Offenses

The following conduct is prohibited:

  • NonConsensual Sexual Intercourse
  • NonConsensual Sexual Contact
  • Sexual Harassment
  • Sexual Harassment – Hostile Environment
  • Sexual Exploitation
  • Actions that fall within the broader range of sexual misconduct, as described in “Other forms of sexual misconduct” below
  • Stalking
  • Dating Violence
  • Domestic Violence
  • Retaliation

Definitions of Specific Offenses

  • NonConsensual Sexual Intercourse is any vaginal and/or anal penetration – however slight – by a penis, object, tongue, or finger, and/or oral copulation (mouth to genital contact), by any person upon another without effective consent.
  • NonConsensual Sexual Contact is any contact of a sexual nature – however slight – with the breasts, buttocks, groin, genitals, mouth, or body part of another, by any person upon another without effective consent. Sexual touching also includes an individual causing someone else to touch him or her with, or on, any of these body parts.
  • Sexual Harassment is unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature, and may include unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or nonverbal conduct of a sexual nature. It may be based on or result from power differentials, the creation of a hostile environment (defined below), or retaliation.
  • Sexual Harassment – Hostile Environment is harassing conduct of a sexual nature that is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent that it interferes with or limits the ability of a member of the community to participate in or to receive benefits, services, or opportunities from WCADF’s programs or activities. One instance that is sufficiently severe, such as a sexual assault or rape, can create a hostile environment.
  • Sexual Exploitation. Nonconsensual abuse or exploitation of another person’s sexuality for the purpose of sexual gratification, financial gain, personal benefit or advantage, or any other improper purpose.
  • Other forms of sexual misconduct include, but are not limited to, the following:
    • Invasion of privacy of a sexual nature.
    • Procuring, offering, or promoting prostitution.
    • Intentional transmission of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) or another sexually transmitted disease.
    • Attempts to commit sexual misconduct. and
    • Facilitating, aiding, encouraging, and/or assisting a violation of this policy.
  • Stalking is engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress. Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates with or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
  • Dating Violence is sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the person against whom the violence is perpetrated. The existence of a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature may be determined by the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, the frequency of the interactions between the persons involved in the relationship, and other relevant contextual factors. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.
  • Domestic Violence is sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse committed by
    • a person who is the current or former spouse or domestic partner of the person against whom the violence is perpetrated.
    • a person who shares a child in common with the person against whom the violence is perpetrated.
    • a person who is cohabitating or has cohabitated as a spouse or in the context of a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the person against whom the violence is perpetrated. or
    • a person who has another type of intimate relationship, including as a parent, guardian, or other status defined by Tennessee law or college policy, with the person against whom the violence is perpetrated.
  • Retaliation against any person who makes a complaint or has participated in the investigation or resolution of a complaint involving a violation of this policy is prohibited. WCADF will take prompt and responsible action to address any reports of retaliation.

Clarifications

Force includes physical force (such as pushing, hitting, pinning down), threats (direct or indirect expressions of intent to inflict harm to self or others), intimidation (implied or indirect threats), and/or other forms of coercion.

To coerce is to attempt to cause another person to act or think in a certain way by use of force, pressure, threats, or intimidation. to compel is to coerce.

Blacking out is an amnesialike state that may be brought on by drugs, heavy drinking, or intoxication. blacking out is not necessarily incompatible with the ability to engage in simple or even complex behavior. Afterwards the person has no recollection of all or part of the events that occurred during the blackout. There is a distinction between passing out (falling asleep or becoming unconscious) due to drug or alcohol use and blacking out in that a person in a blackout remains conscious and operative.

Incapacitation includes the inability to make a rational, reasonable decision. Incapacitation can result from the taking of GHB, Rohypnol, Burundang, Ketamine, or other sedatives or “daterape” drugs, or excessive use of alcohol or other drugs. Evidence of incapacitation may include, but is not limited to, one or more of the following:

  • slurred speech
  • bloodshot eyes
  • the smell of alcohol on the breath
  • shaky equilibrium
  • vomiting
  • outrageous or unusual behavior
  • unconsciousness
  • elevated blood alcohol level
  • blacking out

A person wishing to engage in sexual activity with another must specifically determine the capacity of that potential sexual partner to provide “affirmative Consent,” as explained below.

Intoxication refers to a state of stupefaction, exhilaration or euphoria resulting from the ingestion of alcohol or other chemical substances.

Blacking out, incapacitation, and intoxication do not provide a valid explanation or excuse for violation of this policy.

Effective Consent is consent that is informed and freely and actively given. Effective consent requires mutually understandable words or actions indicating a willingness to engage in mutually agreedupon sexual activity.

  • The person who wishes to engage in sexual activity with another bears the burden of specifically asking/obtaining permission if effective consent is in question or ambiguous.
  • Effective consent must be maintained by both parties throughout the sexual interaction.
  • Effective consent to sexual activity may be revoked at any time, at which point sexual activity must cease immediately.
  • A person who is the object of sexual aggression is not required to physically or otherwise resist a sexual aggressor in order to convey or demonstrate a lack of effective consent.

This policy is predicated upon the requirement to obtain effective consent (communicating “yes” by word or action) rather than denial (saying “no”). To clarify, this means a lack of a “yes” by word or action should be interpreted as saying “no.” Not saying “no” is not effective consent.

Previous sexual relationships of the complainant and the respondent with others are irrelevant, but a previous and/or current sexual relationship between the complainant and the respondent may or may not be relevant depending on the facts and circumstances, as to whether effective consent was sought or obtained.

  • Effective consent expires.
  • Effective consent lasts for a reasonable time, depending on the circumstances. For example, effective consent on one occasion, whether on the same day or another day, may not carry over to another time.
  • Effective consent cannot be implied by attire, nor can it be inferred from the buying of dinner, the spending of money on a date, being invited or accepting an invitation to a person’s residence, or engaging in kissing or other foreplay.

One who is incapacitated as a result of alcohol or other drug consumption (voluntary and/or involuntary), or who is unconscious, unaware, asleep, or otherwise physically helpless, is incapable of giving effective consent. Because effective consent must be informed, an individual may not engage in sexual activity with another whom the individual knows, or should reasonably know, is incapacitated. Because effective consent can never be provided by an incapacitated person, effective consent is deemed withdrawn when an individual becomes incapacitated at any point during sexual activity.

Agreement or acquiescence obtained through the use of fraud or force (actual or implied), whether that force be physical force, threats, intimidation, or other forms of coercion, is not effective consent.

A person’s age may be a factor in determining the ability to give effective consent.

Agreement or acquiescence is not effective consent when given by the following:

  • individuals with a cognitive disability or other conditions that significantly limit their ability to understand the nature or extent of the action for which effective consent was requested.
  • incapacitated persons. (See “Incapacitation” above.)

Depending on the facts and circumstances, proof of intent may or may not be required to find a violation of this policy. For example, engaging in intercourse without obtaining effective consent constitutes a violation of the policy regardless of intent. On the other hand, intent may be an appropriate consideration in some complaints (such as when one person brushes up against another person in a crowded room).

Reporting An Incident

Watkins takes reports of sexual misconduct and powerbased personal violence seriously. How WCADF responds depends upon a variety of factors, including the wishes of the victim, the facts and circumstances of the specific incident, to whom it was reported, and the school’s obligations under applicable federal and state laws.

This section explains the various reporting and confidential disclosure options available to members of WCADF’s community to enable them to make informed choices about where to turn should they experience sexual misconduct or powerbased personal violence.

Confidential Resources

Some resources are confidential. Confidential resources include licensed professional counselors/mental health providers, such as those at the Sexual Assault Center. pastoral counselors acting in that capacity. and medical professionals, such as those at clinics or hospitals. These resources do not report any information about an incident to the Title IX Coordinator without a victim’s permission. However, these resources may have reporting obligations under state or federal law. For example, healthcare providers and certain other individuals are required to notify law enforcement when a victim seeks treatment for injuries related to a violent crime, including sexual assault. Similarly, all persons are required to notify law enforcement when they receive a report of sexual abuse of a minor.

Responsible Employees for Title IX Reporting

Responsible employees are not confidential resources. A responsible employee is a Watkins employee who has the authority to address sexual misconduct, who has the duty to report incidents of sexual misconduct, or whom a member of the college’s community could reasonably believe has such authority or duty. Generally, with the exception of the confidential resources discussed above, most employees to whom community members might reasonably report an incident of misconduct will be responsible employees. This includes, but is not limited to: senior leadership (e.g., President, Vice President of Institutional Advancement, Vice President of Academic Affairs, including Associates and Assistants), Title IX Coordinator, staff in the Office of Student Life, including Resident Advisers, professional staff in the Office of Academic Affairs, and faculty and staff members (except for guest lecturers and visiting professors).

Responsible employees are required to report possible violations of this policy to the Title IX Coordinator, including all relevant details about the alleged sexual misconduct, so that Watkins can take steps to investigate the matter promptly and resolve it fairly. Conversations with responsible employees are otherwise kept private to the extent possible and are only disclosed to those with a need or right to know.

Before a responsible employee receives any information from a victim, the employee will seek to confirm that the victim understands the employee’s reporting obligations and, if the victim wants to maintain confidentiality, will direct the victim to one of the confidential resources outlined above.

If the victim wants to tell a responsible employee what happened but does not want the complaint investigated or the victim’s name disclosed, the employee will tell the victim that Watkins will consider the request, but cannot guarantee that the school will be able to honor it. In reporting the details of an incident to the Title IX Coordinator, the responsible employee will also inform the Title IX Coordinator of the victim’s request for confidentiality.

Responsible employees will not pressure a victim to request confidentiality or make a full report.

NOTE: All allegations involving the abuse of minors (as explained below) must be reported to law enforcement and Watkins.

Anonymous and ThirdParty Reporting

WCADF encourages victims of sexual misconduct or powerbased personal violence to talk to someone. Watkins encourages third parties to report incidents of sexual misconduct and powerbased personal violence to any responsible employee. The college may not be able to move forward with thirdparty reports if the victim does not wish to cooperate with an investigation. After providing a report, third parties are not entitled to information about WCADF’s investigation and response due to privacy concerns and applicable federal and state laws.

Watkins encourages anyone who witnesses, experiences, or has information about possible sexual harassment and/or sexual misconduct to take reasonable actions to prevent or stop such actions. This may include reporting the behavior (in accordance with the reporting options outlined above), directly intervening when it is safe and reasonable to do so, contacting law enforcement, or other means. A person who has been subjected to sexual harassment and/or sexual misconduct need not confront the other party. the appropriate process to address the conduct is through this policy.

Limited Disciplinary Immunity for Complainants and Witnesses

Individuals with information about sexual misconduct or other powerbased personal violence may hesitate to come forward out of fear that their own violations of policy would be revealed. Students are advised that Watkins does not condone infractions of policy, but considers reporting incidents of sexual misconduct and other powerbased personal violence to be of paramount importance. Therefore, Watkins will generally extend immunity for alcohol or substance abuse violations to victims and potential witnesses in order to facilitate reporting and resolution of sexual misconduct or other powerbased personal violence complaints. Complainants or witnesses may be referred for an alcohol or drug assessment and any recommended counseling.

Public Exhibitions and Artwork

Public exhibitions of artwork or presentations in which students may disclose incidents of sexual violence, are not considered notice to the college of sexual misconduct for purposes of triggering its obligation to investigate any particular incident. Such events may, however, inform the need for campuswide education and prevention efforts, and the college may provide information about students’ Title IX rights at these events.

Protection of Minors on Campus

Watkins is dedicated to the welfare and safety of minors who visit Watkins’s campus, who participate in Watkins’s programs, or who are entrusted to Watkins’s care. Every member of the WCADF community (not limited to individuals who interact with minors) is required by law to report known or suspected instances of the abuse of, neglect of, or inappropriate interactions with minors. Members making a report in good faith are protected from criminal and civil liability for making the report. Everyone is required by Tennessee law to report any type of suspected abuse, neglect, or inadequate care, in addition to suspected child sexual abuse.

Two reports, one external and one internal, must be made:

External Report—Tennessee law requires every person who suspects sexual or physical abuse or neglect of a minor to report it. Failure to report is a Class A misdemeanor. The required report may be made to the State of Tennessee Child Abuse Hotline at 8772370004, online at https://reportabuse.state.tn.us/ or to a Tennessee sheriff’s office or police department. If the situation is a lifethreatening emergency, contact 911.

Internal Report—Every member of the WCADF community has a further obligation to immediately report to Watkins known or suspected abuse or neglect of a minor on campus or in a Watkins program. Reports should be filed with the Title IX Coordinator as soon as possible.

Investigations

Watkins recommends that complaints of sexual misconduct or powerbased personal violence be made to Student Life, but if a person chooses to make an initial complaint to any other responsible employee of the college, that person will refer the matter to the Title IX Coordinator. The Title IX Coordinator has responsibility for investigating reports pertaining to alleged sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, and powerbased personal violence. The Title IX Coordinator is trained annually and on an ongoing basis on issues related to sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, and other powerbased personal violence, and in conducting investigations in a manner that protects the wellbeing and safety of the complainant and the Watkins community. Retaliation against any person who files a complaint, participates in an investigation, encourages the filing of a complaint, or opposes sexual misconduct and powerbased personal violence is prohibited.

Complaints may be filed at any time, but the college encourages community members to report violations as soon as possible after the incident.

To file a complaint pertaining to this policy, please contact the Title IX Coordinator at 6152777411 or visit the office located in the front of the building, room 103. Anonymous complaints and crime reports may also be filed from any campus computer or computer on campus wifi at report.watkins.edu.

Complainants who contact the Title IX Coordinator should provide as much of the following information as possible: what happened, where, and when. names of all parties involved, including witnesses (if any). supporting documentation (if any). and contact information. Everyone is encouraged to report sexual misconduct or powerbased personal violence even if some or all information is unavailable or cannot be provided.

Requests for Confidentiality

All requests for confidentiality will be evaluated by the Title IX Coordinator. In doing so, the Title IX Coordinator will consider the interests of the complainant and the college’s commitment to a safe and nondiscriminatory environment for all members of the WCADF community. In weighing a request that a complainant’s name not be disclosed to the respondent or that no investigatory or disciplinary action be taken, the Title IX Coordinator will consider a variety of factors, including, but not limited to, the complainant’s desire for confidentiality, the circumstances surrounding the alleged misconduct, information concerning any previous allegations involving the respondent, the likelihood of repeated offenses, evidence that the alleged misconduct is part of a pattern of misconduct, and the college’s ability to ensure that the alleged misconduct does not contribute to the creation of a hostile environment for any students.

If a complainant’s request for confidentiality is granted, Watkins’s ability to investigate the incident may be limited. In such situations, the school may, to the extent possible, take steps to mitigate the effects of the alleged sexual misconduct and prevent its recurrence without initiating formal action against the alleged offender or revealing the identity of the complainant. Such actions include, but are not limited to, increased monitoring, supervision, or security at locations or activities where the alleged misconduct occurred. providing training and education for students and employees. revising and publicizing the college’s policies on sexual misconduct, and conducting climate surveys regarding sexual misconduct.

If Watkins determines that it must proceed with a formal investigation, it will inform the complainant prior to notifying the respondent of the investigation. the college will also implement interim measures, as necessary, to protect the complainant and ensure the safety of the Watkins community. In the event the complainant requests that the college inform the respondent that the complainant asked WCADF not to investigate or seek discipline, WCADF will honor this request and inform the respondent that the college made the decision to go forward.

A complainant who initially requests confidentiality is not precluded from later requesting that a full investigation be conducted.

Intake, Charging, and the Investigative Process

A responsible staff person will assess the nature of the complaint through an intake process. The staff person will submit the complaint to the Title IX Coordinator or refer the complainant to the appropriate department if the allegations do not involve a violation of this policy or other antidiscrimination/ retaliation policies.

Responsible staff will first ask the complainant for information about the incident. Supporting documents, such as emails, photos, or text messages, and any other evidence should be preserved. If witnesses were present or have relevant knowledge, it is important to identify them, state what they may know, and inform staff of how they can be contacted. If the complainant chooses not to participate, the Title IX Coordinator will determine whether to conduct an investigation.

In no circumstances will mediation be used to resolve cases of sexual assault or powerbased personal violence.

The Title IX Coordinator will determine any appropriate interim measures.

NOTE: If the Title IX Coordinator determines that an investigation should be conducted and the complainant chooses not to participate, the Coordinator will move forward and make its determination based upon the information available to it.

Upon a determination by the Title IX Coordinator that an investigation will be conducted with a student respondent, the responsible staff will normally provide a copy of the complaint, any additional statements or information provided by the complainant, and any other information gathered during the course of the filing of an incident or police report to the Director of Student Life (or designee), who will determine the charge(s) to be brought, if any, and present the charge(s) to the respondent. After the presentation of the charge(s), the respondent will have the opportunity to agree or disagree with the charge(s). The matter will be referred to the Title IX Coordinator for further investigation and a determination.

Investigative Committee

After the Title IX Coordinator has determined a complaint requires investigation a four person committee will be formed to analyze evidence, hear testimony and determine guilt. The committee with consist of the Title IX Coordinator, one faculty member, one staff member and one resident advisor. Committee members will undergo training by the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic & Sexual Violence and membership will rotate every two years. In cases where conflict of interests exist substitutions may occur.

Investigative Process

The Title IX Coordinator will inform the respondent of the allegations, the initiation of an investigation, and the possibility of sanctions, and will provide the respondent with an opportunity to ask questions, provide information, and offer names of witnesses or other people with relevant information. The investigative committee will interview the respondent and other individuals who may have pertinent knowledge. Supporting documentation and information may be collected from the complainant, respondent, and witnesses. Investigators may request access to premises, records, and documents it deems relevant to the complaint. As the investigation progresses, the committee may seek clarification from any person participating in the investigation regarding the incident or their statement. If the complainant learns or remembers any additional information, the complainant should notify the Title IX Coordinator immediately.

Retaliation

Retaliation against a person who files a complaint, participates in an investigation, encourages one to file, or opposes discrimination is prohibited. In addition, respondents must not interfere with an investigation.

Advisers

Both the complainant and the respondent will be permitted to ask an adviser of their choosing to be present during all relevant meetings related to alleged violations of this policy. The adviser may accompany the complainant or respondent and may confer privately with them, but the adviser may not speak on behalf of the complainant or respondent or otherwise participate in any meeting. An adviser’s failure to comply with these guidelines may result in the termination of the meeting or the adviser no longer being permitted to be present.

Recordings and Evidence

The audio and/or video recording of any meeting conducted as part of an investigation under this policy is prohibited. In addition, given the nature of the college’s process, the testimony of, and information derived from, experts, such as reports of handwriting experts, will not be considered, except in rare circumstances. In those rare cases, determinations as to the appropriateness of testimony of or information derived from an expert will be made in the sole discretion of the Title IX Coordinator.

Past Relationships and Conduct

Previous sexual relationships of the complainant and respondent with others are irrelevant. A past sexual relationship between the parties may or may not be deemed relevant the investigating committee. For example, past sexual encounters between the parties may provide insight on communication patterns for purposes of determining if effective consent was granted. However, other allegations of sexual misconduct may be considered only if determined relevant by the Title IX Coordinator based on all relevant facts and circumstances.

Determinations and Sanctioning

At the conclusion of the investigation, the Title IX Coordinator will determine, based on the preponderance of the evidence, whether the alleged acts occurred and violated the Sexual Misconduct and PowerBased Personal Violence policy. The investigative committee will provide its determination, including the basis for the determination, in writing to the complainant and the respondent simultaneously. When the respondent is not determined to have violated the policy, the matter will be closed with no action taken. When the respondent is determined to have violated the policy, the determination will also be forwarded to the appropriate designee for sanctioning, referral, or followup (Director of Student Life for students, Vice President of Academic Affairs for faculty, appropriate supervisor/manager for staff, etc…).

The designee will review the investigative report. If is determined this policy has been violated by the respondent, the designee will render an appropriate sanction. If, upon reviewing the materials, the designee requires clarification or additional information from the investigative committee before rendering a decision as to sanction, they may request such clarification or additional information. The designee will notify the complainant and the respondent simultaneously and in writing of the sanction imposed. The Director of Student Life is trained on an ongoing basis on issues related to sexual misconduct and other powerbased personal violence.

Procedures for Students

The guidelines for sanctions in sexual misconduct and powerbased personal violence cases are set forth below. The Director of Student Life may deviate from the range of recommended sanctions when appropriate based on all the facts and circumstances.

  • The minimum sanction for any student found responsible for NonConsensual Sexual Intercourse is suspension. a student found responsible for this offense may be expelled, depending on all of the relevant facts and circumstances, including any previous conduct infractions.
  • Any student found responsible for NonConsensual Sexual Contact, Sexual Harassment, Sexual Harassment – Hostile Environment, Sexual Exploitation, Stalking, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Retaliation, or the other delineated forms of sexual misconduct, may face a sanction ranging from disciplinary probation to expulsion, depending on all relevant facts and circumstances.
  • Inappropriate behavior that does not create a hostile environment may be addressed through other corrective action, or remediation, consistent with the Student Handbook, depending on all relevant facts and circumstances.
  • In some cases of misconduct, participation in an evaluation and/or treatment program by an approved counseling service may be required as a part of a corrective action plan or sanction. Such treatment may also be a condition of readmission to WCADF or a condition for remaining in the College. In addition to this condition, in cases of suspension, the Director of Student Life may set other conditions for readmission to Watkins.

Procedures for Faculty

If, after receiving information from or consulting with the Title IX Coordinator, the Vice President of Academic Affairs determines that the disciplinary process should be initiated, they will follow the process for violations of the faculty standards of conduct set out in the Faculty Manual.

Procedures for Staff

If, after receiving information from or consulting with the Title IX Coordinator, the staff member’s department head determines that the disciplinary process should be initiated, the process for violations of staff policies will be followed.

Appeals

The complainant and respondent have the right to appeal the determination by the investigative committee and the sanction (if any) rendered by the Director of Student Life. The complainant and respondent will be notified of this right and the procedures for appeal simultaneously in writing.

Off-Campus Events

Collegesanctioned offcampus events are coordinated by a designated faculty or staff member, who bears responsibility for reporting any criminal activity back to a campus security official via the incident reporting system.

CRIME DEFINITIONS

Statistics

On-Campus Housing Fire Statistics

Hawkins Hall 2012 2013 2014 2015
Number of Fires 0 0 0 1
Cause of Fire 0 0 0 0
Number of Injuries 0 0 0 0
Property Damage $0 $0 $0 0
Turner Hall 2012 2013 2014 2015
Number of Fires 0 0 0 0
Cause of Fire 0 0 0 0
Number of Injuries 0 0 0 0
Property Damage $0 $0 $0 $0

Residence Halls parking lot

2015 – 1.Fire was cooking related, no deaths, no injuries. The fire extinguisher was used.

Crime Statistics

The Daytime Facilities Manager acquires annual crime statistics from the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department North Precinct which is responsible for the Watkins Campus and surrounding areas. This information is combined with our own crime log and included in the submitted to the online campus crime survey. The Daytime Facilities Manager reports these crime statistics to the Department of Education Annually, via the Department of Education Web site.

As required by the Clery Act, the most recent three years of data are presented below, arranged by type of offense and calendar (not academic) year.

2013

Offense Watkins Campus Total Residence Halls Non-campus building or property Public Property Total
Murder/nonnegligent 0 0 0 0 0
Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Sex Offense, Forcible 0 0 0 0 0
Sex Offense, nonforcible 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0
Hate Crimes
Race 0 0 0 0 0
Gender 0 0 0 0 0
Religion 0 0 0 0 0
Sexual Orientation 0 0 0 0 0
Ethnicity 0 0 0 0 0
Disability 0 0 0 0 0
Stalking N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dating Violence N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Domestic Violence N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Liquor Law Violation Arrest 0 0 0 0 0
Liquor Law Violation Referral 2 2 0 0 2
Drug Law Violation Arrest 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Law Violation Referral 7 7 0 0 7
Illegal Weapon Violation Arrest 0 0 0 0 0
Illegal Weapon Violation Referral 0 0 0 0 0

2014

Offense Watkins Campus Total Residence Halls Non-campus building or property Public Property Total
Murder/nonnegligent 0 0 0 0 0
Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Sex Offense, Forcible 1 1 0 0 1
Sex Offense, nonforcible 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0
Hate Crimes
Race 0 0 0 0 0
Gender 0 0 0 0 0
Religion 0 0 0 0 0
Sexual Orientation 0 0 0 0 0
Ethnicity 0 0 0 0 0
Disability 0 0 0 0 0
Stalking N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dating Violence N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Domestic Violence N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Liquor Law Violation Arrest 0 0 0 0 0
Liquor Law Violation Referral 4 4 0 0 4
Drug Law Violation Arrest 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Law Violation Referral 2 2 0 0 2
Illegal Weapon Violation Arrest 0 0 0 0 0
Illegal Weapon Violation Referral 1 1 0 0 1

2015

Offense Watkins Campus Total Residence Halls Non-campus building or property Public Property Total
Murder/nonnegligent 0 0 0 0 0
Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0
Sex Offense, Forcible 0 0 0 0 0
Sex Offense, nonforcible 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0
Hate Crimes
Race 0 0 0 0 0
Gender 0 0 0 0 0
Religion 0 0 0 0 0
Sexual Orientation 0 0 0 0 0
Ethnicity 0 0 0 0 0
Disability 0 0 0 0 0
Stalking N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Dating Violence N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Domestic Violence N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Liquor Law Violation Arrest 0 0 0 0 0
Liquor Law Violation Referral 3 3 0 0 3
Drug Law Violation Arrest 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Law Violation Referral 3 3 0 0 3
Illegal Weapon Violation Arrest 0 0 0 0 0
Illegal Weapon Violation Referral 0 0 0 0 0

*Crimes counted as “oncampus” in any given year include the crimes counted in residence halls for that same year.
** If a crime is determined to be biasrelated, a “hate crime,” that crime is reported in this category instead of above.
*** Students may be in violation of College policy without actually violating a law. Disciplinary actions reported here include only those violations that were, in addition to a violation of College policy, a violation of local, state, and/or federal law.

Definitions of crimes are available, with supporting examples, in Chapter 3 of The Handbook for Campus Crime Reporting, made available in 2005 from the U.S. Department of Education Office of Postsecondary Education and available at http://www2.ed.gov/admins/lead/safety/handbook.pdf

President

Posted on: April 7th, 2016 by Steve Wilkison

DR. J. KLINE, Ph.D.
President, Watkins College of Art, Design & Film

 

In becoming the 16th president in Watkins’ century-plus history, Joseph (J.) Kline, Ph.D., brings two decades of higher education administrative experience to the position, with expertise in student recruitment, interdisciplinary programming, fundraising and strategic partnerships. His career is noted for expertise in a variety of arts disciplines and includes distinguished work as a teacher, writer and performing artist.

Watkins J. Kline PhD president lakeside 8.2015 Wweb

President J. Kline

Dr. Kline came to Watkins from Eastern New Mexico University (ENMU), where was Dean of the College of Fine Arts and Professor of Theatre (2009-2015). In that role he guided the major programs in art, theatre, music, music education, digital filmmaking and communication, responsible for curriculum and assessment, budgets, artist activities, recruiting, galleries and capital projects. Among his accomplishments were oversight of a $7.5 million renovation of the art building (fine art, film and graphic design) and a $9 million renovation of the music building. He served on ENMU technology, strategic planning and reaccreditation committees and was host of a weekly show on the university’s NPR-affiliated radio station.

From 2005-2009, Dr. Kline was Professor and Chair, Performing Arts Department, and Producing Artistic Director, School of Performing Arts, at the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD), where he had oversight of curriculum, faculty and staff, budgets and artistic performance of the school of performing arts. He also served as Chair of the Departments of Production Design and of Dramatic Writing (the latter major was developed and launched under his guidance).

Highlights of his SCAD tenure were major program revisions to Performing Arts and Production Design (both BFA and MFA) and substantial increase in student recruitment and production activities (mainstage, studio, lab, singing ensembles). He also established a partnership with the Tony Award-winning Alliance Theatre as a component of performing arts graduate studies, for which he devised the curriculum.

Previously, he was Associate Professor and Chair, Performing and Fine Arts Department, at DeSales University (Center Valley, PA), with executive supervision of majors in TV/Film, theatre and dance and oversight of the university’s fine art and music offerings. While serving as chair, student enrollment in the department increased by more than 100%, making performing and fine arts the largest department in the university.

He was on the artistic staff, as associate/line producer and actor and director, at Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival, the official Shakespeare Festival of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

An effective classroom and studio educator, Dr. Kline’s teaching experience includes acting, directing, arts management, production, theatre history, dramatic literature, criticism, dramaturgy, playwriting and aesthetics.

A member of the Dramatists Guild, Actors’ Equity Association, and SAG-AFTRA, Dr. Kline has directed and/or performed at Pennsylvania Shakespeare, Barter Theatre, Maryland Shakespeare Festival, Folger Theatre, Denver Center Theatre Company, as well as appearing in feature films, network TV series and national commercials. A playwright with more than 10 premier productions to his credit, including original plays, adaptations and dance and multi-media works, he served as playwright-in-residence at the Barter Theatre (the State Theatre of Virginia, in Abingdon).

Dr. Kline holds a Bachelor of Arts in Performing Arts (theatre) from Colorado State University, a Master of Fine Arts in Drama (acting) from the Catholic University of America, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Fine Arts (playwriting/arts management) from Texas Tech University.

 

Watkins Opens Spring BFA Thesis Exhibition Series: Michael Cribbs, Michael Hampton & Sarah McDonald

Posted on: March 4th, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents BFA Thesis Exhibitions 2014, a five-part series of work by 13 graduating students in the Departments of Fine Art and Photography. First up is a triple exhibition from Michael Taylor Cribbs, Michael Hampton and Sarah McDonald, opening Thursday, March 27, with a reception from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Their work will be on display in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus through April 6.

Ralphy and Vuppé 1 - Michael Cribbs“Ralphy and Vuppé” by Michael Cribbs

Cribbs, a candidate for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Fine Art, seeks to transport the audience to a different world through digital painting, music, and installation with his show Ralphy and Vuppé, depicting a story that explores the ideas of imagination, freedom and adventure.

Hampton, also a BFA in Fine Art degree candidate, focuses on graphite drawings, video work, performance and soft sculpture in his show Golden Disappointment. His work follows the playful yet thoughtful mode of jokes, applying cartoons and outlandish performances to darker subtleties of common life. The exhibition also includes two short films inspired by classic cartoons,

Michael Hampton film still

from Michael Hampton’s “dumbhounded”

“dumbhounded” (16 min.) and “Fraidy Cat” (16 min.), screening in a double feature in the Watkins Theater at 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. “dumbhounded is a humorous appropriation and representation of Droopy Dog’s debut cartoon, with editing that heightens the underlying oddities within the narrative while making a new experience as a whole. Similarly, “Fraidy Cat” (from a Tom and Jerry episode) focuses on the bizarre shift of the typical cat-chases-mouse format. The episode poses a rather vulnerable Tom Cat, the usual antagonist, as victim to the haunting whims of Jerry Mouse. The amusing turns to grave as the footage is prolonged and extended, repeated and stuttered, playing with the original purposes of the episode while stretching the limits of the joke.

McDonald, a candidate for the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Photography, presents Actual Instances, a series of photographs taken on short walks and long drives throughout her home state of Tennessee. The collection of giclée prints combines ambiguous scenarios and familiar typologies to investigate how still images often romanticize the subject.

The exhibitions and reception are free and the public is invited. Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter; free parking is available in the campus lot.  For more information, visit Watkins.edu or call 615.383.4848.

RalphyandVuppé 2 by Michael Cribbs

from “Ralphy and Vuppé”

Michael Taylor Cribbs, Franklin, TNmichaelcribbs.blogspot.com
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Ralphy and Vuppé (illustration, digital painting, installation)

Michael Taylor Cribbs is an illustrator specializing in children’s book illustrations and narrative based work through a digital medium. He explores these narrative fantasies by using historical ideas within different categories of art, which include romanticism, concepts of the sublime, aspects of cinematography, surrealism, installation, and the incorporation of music within art.

Michael Hampton, Nashville michaelhamptonart.tumblr.com
BFA in Fine Art
Show title: Golden Disappointment (graphite on paper, video, polyester toy fabric, ink on balloons)

Michael Hampton is a fine artist focused on graphite drawings, video work, performance, and soft sculpture.

Michael Hampton  graphite drawing 2

Michael Hampton (graphite on paper)

He has exhibited in various shows throughout the city including Staying the Course (2014) and Abstractions Imaginative Fictions (2013) at WAG, Pink Lemonade (2013) at Ground Floor Gallery, and Projections (2013), at Platetone Print. He is also an active council member of the Co. H artist collective at Watkins and has performed stand-up comedy at Zanies, Mercy Lounge, the High Watt, East Room and Cult Fiction Underground.

Hampton’s work explores the tropes of jokes and humor and their malleability within a critical frame. He is interested in the darker subtleties and rich actualities that can be surfaced through humorous means. Cartoon imagery lends itself to the hands of thoughtful comedy and appropriated play, offering at once something simple while also speaking to something far more complex. In his thesis exhibition Golden Disappointment, Hampton pulls at these underlying narratives through processes of stacking, stuttering, isolating and amplifying. The works also bring into question the limit of a joke and champion an acceptable futility that teaches us how to lose.

Sarah McDonald, Nashville • sarahmcdonald.net
BFA in Photography
Show title: Actual Instances (medium format photography, giclée prints)

SarahMcDonald_Hermitage

“Hermitage,” Sarah McDonald

Sarah McDonald is interested in everyday moments that make up a larger unknown narrative. Actual Instances presents a collection of images taken on short walks and long drives throughout her home state of Tennessee. McDonald combines ambiguous scenarios and familiar typologies to investigate how still images often romanticize the subject. She is thinking about repetition, desire, disillusionment and repetition.

McDonald won first place in the 2013 Currey Juried Student Show at Watkins and was a finalist in the Nashville Scene’s 2011 Photography Contest; her photography is currently on view in the annual Community Arts Program Student Exhibit in Cummins Station. Her work often focuses on travel, place and the passage of time. In addition to photography, her creative pursuits include bookbinding, sewing and collage.

Watkins BFA 3.27.14 Cribbs_Hampton_McDonald evite large

Click image for larger version

The Spring 2014 Watkins BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions will continue in the Currey Gallery April 10–20 with Crystal Petrina and Alexine Rioux; April 24–May 4 with Christopher Creasy, Jordan Martin and Hannah Taylor; and May 8–18 with Amy Clutter, Samantha Carlson and Michelle Graham. Ray Palumbo and Chelsea Wright will present their show April 18 in an offsite space.

Regular Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Admission and parking are free.

Watkins closed Feb. 18

Posted on: March 3rd, 2014 by Caroline Davis

Because of inclement weather, Watkins is again closed on Wednesday, February 18. Tonight’s screening of the documentary Corrections and Ashley Hunt’s visiting artist lecture scheduled for February 19 have been postponed; future dates TBD.

Careers

Posted on: February 18th, 2014 by Steve Wilkison

October 2014: Watkins recently completed a 12-year survey of alumni employment (2003-2014). Although we were not able to track every alumnus/a who graduated since 2003, the following is a breakdown of current career status of those traced.

Film (BFA Degree):
Working in film or film-related career or currently in graduate school – 85%
Employed but not in film related position – 13%

Fine Art (BFA Degree):
Working as an artist or art-related career or currently in graduate school – 77%
Employed but not in an art-related position – 16%

Graphic Design (BFA Degree):
Working as a graphic designer or design-related career or currently in graduate school – 91%
Employed but not in a graphic design related field – 8%

Interior Design (BFA Degree):
Working as an interior designer or design-related career or currently in graduate school – 94%
Employed but not in a interior design related field – 5%

Photography (BFA):
Working as a photographer or in a photography-related or currently in graduate school – 91%
Employed but not in a photography-related field – 9%

What can you do with a degree in the visual arts? Below is a partial list of some of the positions currently held by our alumni.  For additional information on how visual arts graduates are generally succeeding in the workforce, check out the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP), developed and distributed by Indiana University.

Film

Directors
Creative Executive
Producers
Senior Editors
Digital Media Engineer
Production Co. Owner
TV Art Director
Multimedia Producer and Educator
Production Coordinator
Screenwriters
Owner – Photography Studio
Film Equipment Manager
Cinematographers
Museum Art Preparator
Production Assistant
Interactive Developer
Media Specialist
Director of Technology
Camera Operators
Sound Effects Editor
Exhibiting Video Artist
Sports Director
Special Effects Supervisor
Scenic Artist
Script Supervisor
Media Buyer
Production Assistant
Videographer
Location Sound Specialist
Owner – film catering business
Assistant Director
Founder of WOFADMAP

Fine Art

Exhibiting Artists
Costume and Fantasy Art Designer
High School Art Teachers
College Art Teachers
Portrait Painter
Director of Design
Gallery Owners
Owner – Film Production Company
Senior Designer for Major Retailer
Visual Coordinator
Museum Curator
Exhibition Designer
Performance Artist
Display Designer
Jewelry Designer
Magazine founder
Non-Profit Director
Non-Profit Coordinator
Ceramics Instructor
Visual Merchandiser
Muralist
Tee Shirt Designer
Floral Designer
Film Production Art Director

Graphic Design

Graphic Designers
Illustrators
Poster Designer
Web Developers
Senior Designers for Multi-media/Record Label
High School Art Teacher
Art Directors
Project Managers
Creative Directors
Magazine Creative Designer
User Interface Designers
Lead Designer for Apparel Design Company
Book Designers
Design Company Owners
UX/UI Developers
Marketing Communications Manager
Production Artist
MAC Pro Specialists
Interactive Designer
Communications Consultants
Instructional Designer
Principal Designer
Owner – Museum Display Company

Interior Design

Residential Designers
Commercial Designers
Directors of Design
Cakes Decorating Company Owner
Senior Clinical Consultant
Procedural Manager
Cabinet Design Representative
Paint Color Specialist
Non-Profit Director
Fung Shui Specialist
Kitchen & Bath Designers
Purchasing Specialist
Revit Designers
Construction Coordinator
Film Production Designer
Project Managers
Architects
CAD Designers
SketchUp Renderers
Museum Designer
Facilities Planning Specialist

Photography

Exhibiting Photographers
Commercial Photographer
Wedding Photography Company Owner
Studio Assistants
Creative Artist Agency Assistant
Director of Creative Services
Magazine Photographers
High School Art Teacher
College Photography Instructors
College Digital Art Instructor
Catalog Photographer
U.S. Department of Defense Photographer
Car Dealer In-House Photographer
Studio Owners
Non-Profit Project Coordinator
Book Bindery Studio Owner

About Map

Posted on: February 6th, 2014 by Steve Wilkison

View Nashville by Watkins College of Art, Design & Film in a larger map

WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery)

Posted on: February 2nd, 2014 by Steve Wilkison

wag1

The Watkins Arcade Gallery – WAG – is a public exhibition space of Watkins College of Art, Design & Film committed to serving the College community and the community at large through exhibitions and programs that enhance curriculum as well as engage a greater audience in the visual arts. WAG is dedicated to supporting the educational and cultural mission of the College by encouraging students to think independently and creatively about their art practice and role as critical thinkers within the cultural landscape.

Located in suite 77 of the historic downtown Arcade, in the 5th Avenue of the Arts district, WAG is open from 6 to 9 pm during the monthly First Saturday Art Crawl and by appointment

Currey Gallery

Posted on: February 2nd, 2014 by Steve Wilkison

gallery-header

The Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery is the primary exhibiting space on the Watkins campus and presents two- and three-dimensional artwork, as well as multi-media installations including sound, video and performance. Students are provided an opportunity to exhibit every year in our annual juried student show, in departmental exhibitions, and at the conclusion of their degree program with a senior thesis exhibition. In addition, faculty and guest artists are invited to exhibit in the space.

brownley galleryGallery Hours:

Monday – Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Saturday – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday – 2 to 4 p.m.

Free admission, with ample, free parking in the campus lot.

Exhibition Schedule

JANUARY 8-22, 2016

19th Annual Interior Design Student Exhibit
a juried show featuring works by Bachelor of Fine Art in Interior Design degree candidates

Reception & awards presentation: Friday, January 22, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

FEBRUARY 4 through March 10, 2016

Currey Juried Student Show, featuring outstanding work in fine art, film, graphic design, interior design and photography, created since Fall 2015

Awards Reception: Thursday, February 4, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Presentations will begin at 6 p.m.

MARCH 24 through MAY 15, 2016
Spring 2015 series of BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions in Fine Art and Photography

March 24 – April 3
Mackenzie Maroney, BFA in Photography: Today I Saw A Butterfly
Cassi Wright, BFA in Fine Art: The Hallowed Woods

Opening reception: Thursday, March 24, 5:30 to 8 p.m.

April 7
Joseph Newsome, BFA in Photography: Cope
(in the lighting studio)

One night only: 5:30 to 8 p.m.

April 7 – 17
David Anderson, BFA in Fine Art: What’s in My Soup?
Andrew Cox, BFA in Photography: Looking Glass
Christopher Strachan, BFA in Fine Art: Through Milk and Oil

Opening reception: Thursday, April 7, 5:30 to 8 p.m.

April 21 – May 1
Lily Adcock, BFA in Fine Art: Inhabit
Upreyl Mitchell, BFA in Photography: ‘cuz they ain’t make ‘em like you
Sophia Alana Stevenson, BFA in Fine Art: high-gloss

Opening reception: Thursday, Apri 21, 5:30 to 8 p.m.

May 5 – 15
Mali Hamilton, BFA in Fine Art: Domestic Oblivion
Aaron Harper, BFA in Fine Art: Garden Relay
Rebecca Lindley, BFA in Photography: Hiraeth

Opening reception: Thursday, May 5, 5:30 to 8 p.m.

MAY 26 through JULY 21, 2016

Summer student show from Co. H: Don’t Drink the Milk, featuring work by Stevie Bailey, Kevin Dietz, Holden Head, Tristan Higginbotham, Corrina Joyner, Kay Kennedy, Micah Mathewson, Carly Piccione and Rafer White

Closing reception: Thursday, July 21, 6 to 8 p.m.

JULY 29, 2016

One Night Only! Department of Community Education presents Pre-College Program Exhibition featuring work by Pre-College Program students, in drawing & painting, film and graphic design tracks

Reception: Friday, July 29, 5 to 7 p.m.

AUGUST 4 – 25, 2016

Hatch Show Print & Department of Graphic Design present posters from their summer workshop
Closing reception: Thursday, August 25, 5 to 7:30 p.m

SEPTEMBER 1 – 23, 2016

Faculty exhibition with work by
Brady Haston, assistant professor, Department of Fine Art
Angelique Rabus, visiting assistant professor, Department of Photography
Steve Wilkison, associate professor, Department of Graphic Design

SEPTEMBER 30 through OCTOBER 14, 2016

Exhibition in conjunction with sixth annual of Handmade & Bound book arts festival (October 1), presented by the Watkins Library and the Community Education department

Opening reception: Friday, September 30, 5 to 7 p.m.

OCTOBER 20 through NOVEMBER 3, 2016

Annual Graphic Design department juried show Split & Twisted
Student projects in Advertising, Books & Jackets, Identity, Illustration, Illustration Series, Package Design, Poster/Design, Publication Design, Multimedia, and Miscellaneous/Design

Opening reception: Thursday, October 20, 5:30 to 8 p.m.

NOVEMBER 10 through DECEMBER 15

Fall 2016 series of BFA Senior Thesis Exhibitions in Fine Art and Photography

Governance

Posted on: January 15th, 2014 by Steve Wilkison

Board of Trustees

Officers

Samuel E. Stumpf, Jr. (Chair)

Ken McDonald (Vice-Chair)

Taylor H. Henry (Secretary/Treasurer)

Commissioners/Trustees

Watkins Commissioners_2014

Commissioners Walter Knestrick, Susan Basham and Brownlee O. Currey, Jr.

Susan A. Basham

Brownlee O. Currey, Jr.

Walter Knestrick

Trustees

Beth Scott Clayton Amos

Emme Nelson Baxter

Lynn Bennett

David H. Berryman

James H. Clayton III

Stephanie Conner

Dee Doochin

Donna Glassford

Robert M. Hebert, Jr.

Reggie Hill

Anna Jaap

James R. Kelley

Carol L. McCoy

Eileen N. McGinn

Debbye W. Oliver

Cano A. Ozgener

Laurence M. (Larry) Papel

Samantha Saturn

Walter F. Schatz

Steve Sirls

John M. Steele

Tarun Surti

Pam Thomas

Laura Turner

William (Bill) Warfield

Waddell H. Wright

Trustees Emeriti

Ward DeWitt, Jr.

Ralph T. Glassford

Lee Ann Hawkins

Lucille Nabors

Paulette Whitworth

Ex Officio

J. Kline, Ph. D., President, Watkins College of Art, Design & Film

Bill Haslam, Governor, State of Tennessee

Herbert H. Slatery III, Attorney General, State of Tennessee

 

Commissioners’ photo by Jeremy Ryan

 

Visiting Artists Archive

Posted on: January 15th, 2014 by Steve Wilkison

Watkins hosts many artists, designers, and filmmakers to come and speak directly to the students and also to the public at large.  Below is a list of just some of these talented people who, in recent years,  have shared their time, their stories, and their advice.

-A-

Natalia Almada – Filmmaker

Gail Anderson – Creative Director of Design at SpotCo. NYC

Joel Anderson – Anderson Design Group

-B-

Ann Beatts – Screenwriter

David Bennett – CMT Lead Animator

Gina Binkley – Alter Ego Design, Illustration and Photography

John Henry Blatter – Media and Sound Artist

Wayne Brezinka – Design and Illustration

Shawn Brown – Photographer

-C-

David Carson – Author, Typographer, Designer

Keith Carter – Photographer

Barry Cook – Disney Animator

Aisha Cousins – Visual Artist

-D-

Jessica Davis – Interior Designer

Bob Delevante – Designer and Photographer

Mike Delevante – Owner, Delevante Creative

Dean Dixon – Photographer

-E-

Susan Eaddy –Children’s Author and Illustrator

Vern Evans – Photographer

-F-

Harrell Fletcher – Social Practice Artist

Phil Foster – Illustrator

Travis Foster – Illustrator

-G-

Marcelle Guilbeau – Interior Designer

-H-

Beth Haley – Interior Designer

Helen Hannah – Interior Designer

David Hilliard – Photographer

Rocky Horton – Visual Artist

-I, J-

Nancy Inman – Designer

Terri Jones – Visual Artist

-K-

Rainey Kirk – Illustrator

Miwon Kwon – Art Historian & Critic

-L-

Liz Magic Laser – Video and Performance Artist

Deborah Luster – Photographer

-M-

David Macauley – Author, Illustrator

Laray Mayfield – Film Casting Director

David McClister – Photographer/Director

Bryce McCloud – Illustrator and Designer

Kim Michaud – Interior Designer

Greg Miller – Photographer

-N,O,P-Q-

Zach Provonchee – Architect

R. H. Quaytman – Painter

-R-

Dan Read – Hollywood Makeup Artist

Lucie Rice – Illustrator

Artemio Rodriguez – Printmaker & Illustrator

Bethany Rooney – Television Director

Bill Ross – Children’s Author and Illustrator

Rebecca Ruegger – Painter and Illustrator

Michael Rutherford – Photographer

-S-

Chris Sickels – Animator and Children’s Book Illustrator

Jeff Silva – Visual Artist

Julie Sola – Printmaker and Designer

T. L. Solein – Painter

Alec Soth – Photographer

Robert Stone – Film Producer

Jock Sturges – Photographer

-T-

Sheila Turner – Photographer

-U,V,W,X,Y,Z-

Wayne White – Painter and Sculpture

Elizabeth Williams – Art Director