Handmade & Bound, Vol. 4: “Root Hog or Die” screening with John Porcellino

Posted on: August 22nd, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
October 3, 2014 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Where:
Watkins Theater

Root Hog or Die posterOn Friday, October 3, the Handmade & Bound kicks off with the Poetry and Prints exhibition, opening in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m. The gallery show takes its name from a series of community workshops designed to produce handmade books inspired by the art of Wassily Kandinsky, one of the most influential artists of the 20th century and the subject of an upcoming retrospective at the Frist (Sept. 26-Jan. 2, 2015).

Following the gallery reception, Watkins will welcome acclaimed zine author/publisher John Porcellino for the Nashville premiere of “Root Hog or Die,” a 2014 documentary about his life and work. Currently living in South Beloit, Illinois, the Chicago native has been writing, drawing, and publishing minicomics, comics and graphic novels for more than 25 years; his self-published series King-Cat Comics, begun in 1989, has inspired a generation of alternative comics creators.

With equal parts Thoreau and Hüsker Dü, Porcellino’s comics showcase the “moments between moments” which make up the majority of our lives, but which many fail to notice. The title phrase is John Porcellino’s personal motto in regards to creating King-Cat: the saying about self-reliance refers to the colonial practice of releasing hogs into the wild to fend for themselves or starve.

“Root Hog or Die” (90 min., dir. Dan Stafford) will screen at 7 p.m. in the Watkins Theater, followed by a Q&A with Porcellino. [See trailer here.]

WAG’s Sept. show: “Iconophilia”

Posted on: August 22nd, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
August 22, 2014 @ 9:45 am – 10:45 am
Where:
WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery)

Iconophilia Sept2014 WAG evite fWatkins College of Art, Design & Film marks the first anniversary of its downtown gallery WAG during the September 6 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl with Iconophiliafeaturing summer studio work in multiple media from Fine Art majors Heather Barrie, Kevin Deitz and Ashley Dogget.

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

WAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues. For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

 

General Auditions for Fall Productions

Posted on: August 22nd, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
September 13, 2014 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Where:
The Film School at Watkins

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film will hold a general casting call for Fall 2014 student film projects on Saturday, September 13, at the Watkins campus in Metro Center.

Directors of more than 20 productions–from the film programs at Watkins and, for the first time, Belmont University–will be looking for actors of all ages. Student films are being made under the SAG/AFTRA student film agreement and therefore all current union members are allowed to participate. Actors are asked to bring headshots and résumés.

Auditions will consist of cold readings from the script (with on-camera readings at the discretion of each director). Casting breakdowns and proposed shoot dates (usually over a 3-day/Friday–Sunday period) will be posted to this auditions page as they become available and will be distributed on site.

Audition slots will be divided according to gender and age throughout the day (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.); individual appointments are not available.

  • 10 to 11 a.m. – Leading men, age range 19-40
  • 11 a.m. to noon – Leading and character men, age range 40 and up
  • Noon to 1 p.m. – Leading women, age range 19-40
  • 1 to 2 p.m. – Leading and character women, age range 40 and up
  • 3 to 4 p.m. – Children and youth, age range 8-18

Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in Metro Center (across from the Looby). Free parking is available in the campus lot.

All cast members will be invited to a screening of projects at the end of the semester and will have access to an online copy of the film and a quick-time file (without music) to cut into a reel.

 

ABC workshop — “Yours, Mine & Ours: Copyright & Intellectual Property Fundamentals”

Posted on: August 21st, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
August 28, 2014 @ 1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
Where:
Room 804

ABC logoThe Arts & Business Council of Greater Nashville is partnering with Watkins to present a workshop addressing the basics of intellectual property and copyright law on Thursday, August 28, from 1 to 2:15 p.m. in Room 804.

“Yours, Mine & Ours: Copyright & Intellectual Property Fundamentals” will cover copyright laws’ exclusive rights and protections and offer perspective of both the law and the creator in this workshop suitable for all levels and artists of all disciplines. Co-facilitators are Carl Eppler of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP and Tennessee Repertory Playwright-in-Residence Nate Eppler.

Cost is $10 for ABC members, $15 for nonmembers. CLE Credit cost is $35 for ABC member attorneys, $50 for nonmembers.

To register, visit www.abcnashville.org/what-we-do/register/

Room 804 is on the second floor of the Cecy Reed Student Center.

Reception for ‘Vignelli Canon’

Posted on: August 21st, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
August 21, 2014 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Where:
Currrey Gallery

Hatch Vignelli-evite-fWatkins College of Art, Design & Film will host a reception for “The Vignelli Canon,” an exhibit celebrating the words of legendary designer Massimo Vignelli through posters designed by Watkins Graphic Design students and produced at Hatch Show Print, on Thursday, August 21, from 5 to 7 pm.

The show, which runs through August 29 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus, is the result of a continuing collaboration between Watkins and Hatch Show Print, one of the oldest working letterpress print shops in America.

In a one-day summer workshop, Watkins students were challenged to use Hatch’s landmark collection of typefaces, along with traditional letterpress methods, to create posters that expressed the ethos of influential Italian-born designer Massimo Vignelli.

Opening reception for faculty show: Mary Addison Hackett, Ariel Lavery, Robin Paris & Tom Williams

Posted on: July 14th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
September 4, 2014 @ 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Where:
Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery

Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 1 to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m

Watkins_2014FacultyShow_9.4_26 eviteWatkins College of Art, Design & Film presents “Monuments, Hotel Soap and Linear Progressions,” a multiple media exhibition featuring recent work by faculty artists Mary Addison HackettAriel Lavery, Robin Paris and Tom Williams, from September 4–26 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

Mary Addison Hackett, adujunct instructor in painting, Department of Fine Art

Ariel Lavery, assistant professor of sculpture, Department of Fine Art

Robin Paris, associate professor and chair, Department of Photography

Tom Williams, assistant professor in art history, Department of Art

 

 

Faculty Show: “Monuments, Hotel Soap and Linear Progressions”

Posted on: July 14th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
September 5, 2014 @ 10:00 am – September 26, 2014 @ 8:00 pm
Where:
Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery

Watkins_2014FacultyShow_9.4_26 evite Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents “Monuments, Hotel Soap and Linear Progressions,” a multiple media exhibition featuring recent work by faculty artists Mary Addison HackettAriel Lavery, Robin Paris and Tom Williams, from September 4–26 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

WAG’s August show: “A Field Guide to Getting Lost” from Jenna Maurice & John Whitten

Posted on: July 9th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
August 2, 2014 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Where:
WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery)

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents A Field Guide to Getting Lostfeaturing video work by alumni Jenna Maurice and John Whitten, at its downtown gallery WAG during the August 2 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl.

Jenna Maurice Lowest Point

“Lowest Point”

Taken from the title of the 2006 book by Rebecca Solnit, A Field Guide to Getting Lost is a video-based exhibition about Maurice and Whitten’s relationships with nature, the unknown, and their search for the unfamiliar. These artists champion being lost. It is a goal for which they strive. Their research happens deep in secluded areas where isolation and solitude are desirable characteristics. Having relocated from Nashville to geographic regions offering some of the United States’ most diverse landscapes (Maurice to Colorado and Whitten to Oregon), their work deals with the subtleties of communication amid isolation, and their interpretation of the natural world. Fueled by a desire to discover a deeper level of connectedness to their environment, the two artists employ a range of tactics from subtle, poetic gestures of mimicry to spectacular displays of signals designed to attract help. In this work, both artists question their sense of place in the natural world, what it means to make one’s way through life, and what it means to be a lost soul.

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

Art Crawl logoWAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues. For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

Co. H’s ‘Mystic Truths’ reception

Posted on: June 30th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
July 12, 2014 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Where:
Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery, 2298 Rosa L. Parks Blvd.

Mystic Truths, a multi-media exhibition from Watkins College of Art, Design & Film’s student-led collective Co. H, will celebrate its summer run with a reception on Saturday, July 12, from 6 to 9 p.m. Featuring outstanding work in painting, printmaking, sculpture, drawing, photography, video and installation from 15 area artists, the show remains on view through July 18 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

The reception and exhibition are free and open to the public.

Participants in Mystic Truths: A Group Show From Co. H and Friends,are:

  • Caleb Adcock, Fine Art, senior (digital prints)
  • Mika Agari, Fine Art, senior (video)
  • David Anderson, Fine Art, junior (painting)
  • Heather Barrie, Fine Art, senior (printmaking)
  • Kevin Dietz, Fine Art, sophomore (printmaking)
  • Elisha Farahmand, Fine Art, junior (video)
  • Michael Hampton, Fine Art ‘14 (video)
  • Aaron Harper, Fine Art, senior (drawing)
  • Blake Holland, Film, senior (photography)
  • Casey Payne, Fine Art, junior (painting)
  • Zack Rafuls, Fine Art, senior (sculpture)
  • Alexine Rioux, Fine Art, ’14 (printmaking)
  • Kayla Saito, Fine Art, senior (sculpture)
  • Luke Weir, Fine Art, junior (conceptual/installation)
  • Weng Tze Yang, photography, senior (photographic installation)

Mystic Truths collects work from Co. H council members, collaborators and studio mates in order to present a survey of some of the best work from Watkins students. Featuring current students and recent graduates, Mystic Truths showcases work across all disciplines, including drawing, painting, sculpture, video, photography, installation and printmaking. The title of the show is pulled from the Bruce Nauman neon sign piece “The True Artist Helps The World By Revealing Mystic Truths” (1967), referencing the function of the artist in ironic and hopeful lights simultaneously while also directly supplanting the work within a contemporary context and dialogue.

Currey Gallery’s summer hours are Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.  For more information, visit www.watkins.edu.

Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter. Free parking is available in the campus lot.

About Co. H
A collective of artists from various disciplines of the visual arts, Co. H provides opportunities for both students and professionals pursuing and/or working in the arts. Founded at Watkins in 2011, Co. H activity includes hosting lecture by artists and art professionals, holding studio critiques and collaborating on multi-disciplinary performances within the community. Visit http://companyh.tumblr.com.

About Bruce Nauman

From PBS.org/art21: Born in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Bruce Nauman has been recognized since the early 1970s as one of the most innovative and provocative of America’s contemporary artists. Nauman finds inspiration in the activities, speech, and materials of everyday life. He graduated with a BFA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1964, and with an MFA from the University of California, Davis, in 1966. Confronted with the question “What to do?” in his studio soon after leaving school, Nauman had the simple but profound realization that “If I was an artist and I was in the studio, then whatever I was doing in the studio must be art. At this point art became more of an activity and less of a product.” Working in the diverse mediums of sculpture, video, film, printmaking, performance, and installation, Nauman concentrates less on the development of a characteristic style and more on the way in which a process or activity can transform or become a work of art. A survey of his diverse output demonstrates the alternately political, prosaic, spiritual, and crass methods by which Nauman examines life in all its gory details, mapping the human arc between life and death. The text from an early neon work proclaims: “The true artist helps the world by revealing mystic truths.” Whether or not we—or even Nauman—agree with this statement, the underlying subtext of the piece emphasizes the way in which the audience, artist, and culture at large are involved in the resonance a work of art will ultimately have. Nauman lives in New Mexico.

HerStory Institute screening: “Pushing the Elephant”

Posted on: June 13th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
August 23, 2014 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Where:
Watkins Theater

In partnership with Watkins Community Education, the HerStory Institute presents a summer cinema series of films highlighting the writing, producing, directing, cinematography, production design and editing in films created by women. The series will screen a range of features, shorts and documentary films including but not limited to independent and foreign films, classics and festival favorites. In addition, the HerStory Institute will deliver monthly panels and/or workshops for film aficionados who desire a deeper understanding of the art and craft of film. HerStory Institute is supported by Her Point of View, an international arts and entertainment festival supporting the creative work of women.

In the late 1990s, Rose Mapendo lost her family and home to the violence that engulfed the Democratic Republic of Congo. She emerged advocating forgiveness and reconciliation. In a country where ethnic violence has created seemingly irreparable rifts among Tutsis, Hutus and other Congolese, this remarkable woman is a vital voice in her beleaguered nation’s search for peace.  When war came to Rose’s village, she was separated from her five-year-old daughter, Nangabire. Rose managed to escape with nine of her ten children and was eventually resettled in Phoenix, Arizona. Over a decade later, mother and daughter are reunited in the US where they must face the past and build a new future. As mother and daughter get to know one another, they must come to terms with a painful past, and define what it means to be a survivor, a woman, a refugee and an American.  Through this intimate family portrait unfolding against the wider drama of war, we explore the long-term and often hidden effects of war on women and families, particularly those in traditional societies—financial despair, increased susceptibility to rape, and social ostracism. “Pushing the Elephant” captures one of the most important stories of our age, a time when genocidal violence is challenged by the moral fortitude and grace of one woman’s mission for peace.  This is a powerful first-person portrait of an indomitable woman dedicated to peace and the healing power of forgiveness. A moving, joyful and hopeful chronicle of refugee experience and acculturation in the U.S. today, “Pushing the Elephant” is also an insightful portrait of the changing face of immigration in our increasingly diverse society.

83 min. 2010