Watkins Visiting Artists Series: Jessica Hische, letterer/illustrator

Posted on: November 21st, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
January 22, 2015 @ 6:30 pm – 7:45 pm
Where:
Watkins Theater, Watkins Institute, 2298 Rosa L Parks Boulevard, Nashville, TN 37228, USA

Letterer, illustrator and type designer Jessica Hische – at the age of 31, one of the most influential graphic designers in the world – will launch the 2015 Watkins Visiting Artists Series with a talk on Thursday, January 22, at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film. The presentation will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the Watkins Theater.

The event is free and the public is invited. The Watkins Visiting Artist Series is funded in part by a grant from Humanities Tennessee, an independent affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Jessica Hische color WwebKnown internationally for her award-winning lettering, illustrations and typefaces, Ms. Hische is also an avid “internetter,” with a special interest in the intersection of arts and technology through the lens of web typography (she has the word “Type” tattooed on her left triceps). A native of Charleston, S.C., who grew up in northeastern Pennsylvania, she graduated in 2006 from Tyler School of Art (at Temple University) with a degree in Graphic and Interactive Design, then worked for Headcase Design (Philadelphia) and at Louise Fili Ltd. (New York). In 2009, at the age of 25, she launched her freelance career; her extensive and impressive credits include projects in advertising, books, identity, editorial, marketing/merchandise for The Atlantic, Harper Collins, Target, The New York Times, Wes Anderson, Dave Eggers, Google, American Express, Nike, Samsung, OXFAM America, Speedo, Penguin Books, Neiman Marcus, Papyrus, Starbucks, Victoria’s Secret, MailChimp, Pinterest and Tiffany & Co., among numerous quirky and corporate others. She has been honored as an Art Directors Club “Young Gun” and in Forbes Magazine’s 30 Under 30 (twice).

Jessica Hische Moonrise Kingdom title WwebWhile not primarily a web designer, many of her personal projects are web-centric and she has become as well known for her side projects as for her client work. In her project Daily Drop Cap (2009), she created a new illustrative letter daily, working through the alphabet a total of twelve times; at its peak, the site had more than 100,000 visitors per month. She has also created a number of educational micro-sites including “Mom, This is How Twitter Works,” “Should I Work for Free?” and “Don’t Fear the Internet” (with Russ Maschmeyer, whom she married in 2012), each as entertaining as it is practical. (She even coined the term “procrastiworking” to describe her tendency to procrastinate on client work by working on personal projects.) Many of these sites reflect an engagement with new media and social networks, such as Facebook and Twitter (where she has over 88,000 followers), and they also demonstrate her advocacy for artists’ rights in an era of freelancing and liberal attitudes about intellectual property. Ms. Hische also embodies a new mode of presentation and marketing that rejects age-old distinctions between professional and personal identities. In all these respects, she is a designer whose career addresses the possibilities and predicaments of digital media for artists and creative people working today.

JessicaHische14 Good Plan today WwebMs. Hische works out of Title Case, a by-appointment-only collaborative studio in San Francisco (with fellow letterer and designer Erik Marinovich) as well as the Pencil Factory illustration and design collective in Brooklyn. An engaging, spirited presenter, since 2010 she has spoken at 50+ conferences and seminars all over the world—Auckland, Oslo, Dusseldorf, Dublin, Berlin, Barcelona, Guadalajara, Melbourne, Manila, Vancouver, Copenhagen and Capetown, for starters. She serves on the board of directors of the Type Directors Club, the leading international organization whose purpose is to support excellence in typography, both in print and on screen.

Founded in 1973, Humanities Tennessee is a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to promoting lifelong learning, civil discourse, and an appreciation of history, diversity, and community among Tennesseans. Statewide programs include the annual Southern Festival of Books: A Celebration of the Written Word℠, the Appalachian and Tennessee Young Writers’ Workshops, a variety of History & Culture programs, Grants & Awards for teachers and community organizationsChapter16.org, among many others. To learn more, visit www.humanitiestennessee.org.

WAG’s December show: Luisiana Mera and Jazzmyne Sims

Posted on: November 5th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
December 6, 2014 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Where:
WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery), Arcade Alley, Nashville, TN 37219, USA

WAG Dec 2014 LMera_JSims eviteWatkins presents a double exhibition at its downtown gallery WAG during the December 6 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl, with new work from junior Luisiana Mera and senior Jazzmyne Sims.

Fine Art major Luisiana Mera’s Relevant Distance features delicately rendered charcoal drawings based on images sent to Mera via iPhone from relatives in her native Panama. Through exquisite technique, dramatic lighting and gridded and cropped theatrical spaces, Mera reframes baroque pictorial conventions to deploy a personal and contemporary narrative, creating work that is tactile, velvety and dreamlike. “We experience the world largely through today’s technologies, images that are edited and composed by others on screens and in print. What can be lost is the pre-edited, individual, personal experience,” said Mera. “The sensual quality of the charcoal medium makes it possible to convey an immediate physical experience from these detached images.”

Jazzmyne Sims, studying for a Bachelor of Arts in Art, offers pop up wood sculptures in her show, The Capricious Bend. Tension, mobility and reconstruction play very heavily in these works of Baltic birch, cherry and cedar. “Since the structures of my sculptures are constructed by the tension of the wood being bent, I tend to use little to no hardware, with the exception of clamps,” said Sims. “The installation of my work is also dependent on, and responsive to, the surrounding architecture. With the use of clamps the work is mobile and can easily be reconstructed and turned into some other structure.”Fine Art major Luisiana Mera’s Relevant Distance features delicately rendered charcoal drawings based on images sent to Mera via iPhone from relatives in her native Panama. Through exquisite technique, dramatic lighting and gridded and cropped theatrical spaces, Mera reframes baroque pictorial conventions to deploy a personal and contemporary narrative, creating work that is tactile, velvety and dreamlike. “We experience the world largely through today’s technologies, images that are edited and composed by others on screens and in print. What can be lost is the pre-edited, individual, personal experience,” said Mera. “The sensual quality of the charcoal medium makes it possible to convey an immediate physical experience from these detached images.”

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

About Luisiana Mera
Born and raised in Panama City, Panama, Luisiana Mera moved to Nashville in 2011 to attend Watkins College of Art, Design & Film, where she is a Fine Art major with an emphasis in painting, drawing and figurative studies. Her work has been exhibited extensively on campus and at Cheekwood, Cummins Station and WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery). She has won multiple awards including the Robb Swaney Prize for Excellence in Visual Expression and first place at the Currey Juried Student Exhibition; recently her work was selected for inclusion in INDA 9 (9th International Drawing Annual), a competitive publication of works of contemporary drawing. Visit luisianamera.tumblr.com.

About Jazzmyne Sims
A Tennessee native, Jazzmyne Sims is a senior at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film, pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Art with a concentration in sculpture. She is heavily focused on woodworking, using clamps, tension and, in many sculptures, architecture to create her work, which she describes as “very in the moment and set type based.” She holds several scholarships (including the BA achievement award). She has recently ventured into furniture design where she is incorporating her sculpture style with other mediums.

BFA Thesis Exhibition in Photography: Holden Head

Posted on: October 15th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
December 5, 2014 @ 6:00 pm – December 6, 2014 @ 9:00 pm
Where:
The Packing Plant, 507 Hagan Street, Nashville, TN 37203, USA

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film BFA in Photography candidate Holden Head offers his thesis exhibition, I Is An Other, on Friday and Saturday, December 5-6, from 6 to 9 p.m. at The Packing Plant.

In I Is An Other, Head explores concepts of identity, sexuality, and death in a hospital­-like installation consisting of video, sculpture and photography. Head is interested in “the detachment we have at birth when we are literally severed from our mothers and how that shapes our struggle with selfhood in our attempt to connect with others. Sexuality drives that endeavour, however never fully able to satisfy the separation.” Through scale, proximity, and material, Head brings awareness to our detachment and mortality.

Click to enlarge evite

Click to enlarge evite

The exhibition is free and the public is invited; the December 6 show is part of Nashville’s First Saturday Art Crawl slate. The Packing Plant, curated by Watkins alumna Ann Catherine Carter, is located at 507 Hagan Street in the Wedgewood/Houston Arts District. For more information, visit thepackingplant.net or call 615-383-4848.

An alumnus of Brentwood Academy, Head claimed first prize in Watkins’ 2014 Currey Juried Student Show for his photograph “Astronomy” and was a finalist in the Nashville Scene’s 2013 Photography contest, with two of his images recognized. His work has been exhibited locally at Chromatics and at Track One.

To see more of his work, visit holden-head.squarespace.com

Lecture by filmmaker/designer Prashant Bhargava

Posted on: October 13th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
November 8, 2014 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Where:
Watkins Theater, 2298 Rosa L Parks Boulevard, Watkins Institute, Nashville, TN 37228, USA

The Film School at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film and OZ Arts Nashville will present a special screening and presentation by Prashant Bhargava, an award-winning filmmaker and designer known for his intricately layered and lush visuals, November 7 & 8 in the Watkins Theater.

On Friday, November 7 at 7:30 p.m., Watkins will screen Bhargava’s 2012 feature debut Patang (The Kite, 95 minutes). Weaving the stories of six people during India’s largest kite festival, Patang, which premiered at the Berlin Film Festival, earned a four-star review from Roger Ebert and was named a New York Times Critics Pick.

On Saturday, November 8 at 11 a.m., Bhargava will speak about his career, which includes pioneering work as a commercial director and motion designer as well as a filmmaker with narrative, documentary and experimental credits. Richard Gershman, chair of the Film School at Watkins, will introduce him and facilitate the Q&A session.

The screening and lecture are free, but reservations are encouraged: reservations@watkins.edu.

Bhargava’s visit to Watkins is in conjunction with OZ Arts Nashville’s presentation of Vijay Iyer: Music of Transformation, within which a new film by Bhargava is included. In collaboration with composer/pianist Iyer (a 2013 MacArthur Fellow), Bhargava’s film Radhe Radhe: Rites of Holi, will be screened simultaneously to Iyer’s orchestral music, performed live by the International Contemporary Ensemble and conducted by David Fulmer. Based on Igor Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, Radhe Radhe is a journey of desire and devotion during the colorful and chaotic celebrations of Holi in Mathura, India. Music of Transformation plays two performances at OZ: November 8 at 8 p.m. and November 9 at 2 p.m. Tickets can be purchased via OZNashville.com

About Prashant Bhargava

Described by producer Anthony Bregman as “visionary and soulful” and “masterful” by Roger Ebert, Prashant Bhargava is a director and designer whose work is recognized worldwide for its original storytelling and honest craft. Born and raised on the South Side of Chicago, Bhargava is one of the first South Asians to emerge from the hip-hop movement as a graffiti artist. His filmmaking (his first film, the short Sangam, debuted at Sundance) builds from his pioneering work as a commercial director and motion designer.

Known for his intricately layered and lush visuals, Bhargava spearheaded over 100 campaigns for HBO (including The Wire, Def Poetry Jam, Rome and OZ) and films such as Born into Brothels, John Frankenhiemer’s Path to War, Mira Nair’s Hysterical Blindness, Raoul Peck’s Lumumba, and Denzel Washington’s Antwone Fisher. Bhargava designed effects sequences for Alex Rivera’s feature Sleep Dealer and directed music videos and promos for musical acts Cornershop, Talib Kweli and Missy Elliot. Notable clients include Accenture, NBC, Woolrich, PBS, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Volvo and OMango and collaborations include design and production studios such as R/GA, Click 3x and Edgeworx.

Following Sangam – which received awards at the Clermont Ferrand Film Festival, Nashville Film Festival and Short Shorts Asia – he directed Ammaji, a documentary portrait of his grandmother, Backwaters, an experimental Super 8 short, and Kashmir, a film and live music performance with electronic band Dawn of Midi.

Bhargava’s feature length directorial debut, Patang (The Kite) received rave reviews, including four stars from Roger Ebert who named it one of 2012’s best. An anthem to the old city of Ahmedabad, it weaves the stories of six people during India’s largest kit festival. Patang, which premiered at the Berlin Film Festival and ran in the main competition at the Tribeca Film Festival, won Best Feature Narrative at the Hawaii Film Festival, Best World Narrative at the Indy Film Festival, a Special Jury Award at the Osians Film Festival in New Delhi, Best Feature Narrative at the DC APA Film Festival, and Best Film at the SAIFF’s Rising Star Film Awards; Bhargava was also named Best Director. Defying convention in its process and cinematic language, Patang united a community torn apart by religious conflict and natural disaster, starring two of India’s finest actors, Seema Biswas and Nawazuddin Siddiqui.

His latest work, Radhe Radhe: Rites of Holi, is a journey of desire and devotion during the colorful and choatic celebrations of Holi in Mathura, India. Created in collaboration with celebrated composer and pianist Vijay Iyer, the performance is presented as a film projected in conjunction with a live orchestra, and was described by NPR as “one of the most brilliant and exciting commemorations of the 100th anniversary of Igor Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring.”

Bhargava studied computer science at Cornell University and theatrical directing at the Barrow Group and at the Actors Studio (MFA program). He has lectured at New York University, Cornell University, Amherst College, UNC Chapel Hill, Stonybrook, Indiana University, University of Chicago and CEDIM. Bhargava was a Copeland Fellow at Amherst College and a New York Foundation of the Arts Fellow in both 1997 and 2012.

 

Screening of Prashant Bhargava’s “Patang”

Posted on: October 13th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
November 7, 2014 @ 7:30 pm – 9:15 pm
Where:
Watkins Theater, 2298 Rosa L Parks Boulevard, Watkins Institute, Nashville, TN 37228, USA

Patang-PrashantBhargava eviteThe Film School at Watkins and OZ Arts Nashville will present a special screening and presentation by Prashant Bhargava, an award-winning filmmaker and designer known for his intricately layered and lush visuals, November 7 & 8 in the Watkins Theater.

On Friday, November 7 at 7:30 p.m., Watkins will screen Bhargava’s 2012 feature debut Patang (The Kite, 95 minutes). Weaving the stories of six people during India’s largest kite festival, Patang, which premiered at the Berlin Film Festival, earned a four-star review from Roger Ebert and was named a New York Times Critics Pick.

On Saturday, November 8 at 11 a.m., Bhargava will speak about his career, which includes pioneering work as a commercial director and motion designer as well as a filmmaker with narrative, documentary and experimental credits. Richard Gershman, chair of the Film School, will introduce him and facilitate the Q&A session.

The screening and lecture are free, but reservations are encouraged: reservations@watkins.edu.

Bhargava’s visit to Watkins is in conjunction with OZ Arts Nashville’s presentation of Vijay Iyer: Music of Transformation, within which a new film by Bhargava is included. In collaboration with composer/pianist Iyer (a 2013 MacArthur Fellow), Bhargava’s film Radhe Radhe: Rites of Holi, will be screened simultaneously to Iyer’s orchestral music, performed live by the International Contemporary Ensemble and conducted by David Fulmer. Based on Igor Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, Radhe Radhe is a journey of desire and devotion during the colorful and chaotic celebrations of Holi in Mathura, India. Music of Transformation plays two performances at OZ: November 8 at 8 p.m. and November 9 at 2 p.m. Tickets can be purchased via OZNashville.com

About Prashant Bhargava

Described by producer Anthony Bregman as “visionary and soulful” and “masterful” by Roger Ebert, Prashant Bhargava is a director and designer whose work is recognized worldwide for its original storytelling and honest craft. Born and raised on the South Side of Chicago, Bhargava is one of the first South Asians to emerge from the hip-hop movement as a graffiti artist. His filmmaking (his first film, the short Sangam, debuted at Sundance) builds from his pioneering work as a commercial director and motion designer.

Known for his intricately layered and lush visuals, Bhargava spearheaded over 100 campaigns for HBO (including The Wire, Def Poetry Jam, Rome and OZ) and films such as Born into Brothels, John Frankenhiemer’s Path to War, Mira Nair’s Hysterical Blindness, Raoul Peck’s Lumumba, and Denzel Washington’s Antwone Fisher. Bhargava designed effects sequences for Alex Rivera’s feature Sleep Dealer and directed music videos and promos for musical acts Cornershop, Talib Kweli and Missy Elliot. Notable clients include Accenture, NBC, Woolrich, PBS, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Volvo and OMango and collaborations include design and production studios such as R/GA, Click 3x and Edgeworx.

Bhargava studied computer science at Cornell University and theatrical directing at the Barrow Group and at the Actors Studio (MFA program). He has lectured at New York University, Cornell University, Amherst College, UNC Chapel Hill, Stonybrook, Indiana University, University of Chicago and CEDIM. Bhargava was a Copeland Fellow at Amherst College and a New York Foundation of the Arts Fellow in both 1997 and 2012. For more information, visit www.prashant.tv.

Pushpamala N artist lecture: ‘The Pseudo-Archive’

Posted on: October 8th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
October 27, 2014 @ 6:30 pm – 7:45 pm
Where:
Watkins Theater , 2298 Rosa L Parks Boulevard, Watkins Institute, Nashville, TN 37228, USA

Pushpamala N image Wweb

Bangalore-based Pushpamala N, a photo- and video-performance artist who uses elements of popular culture to explore place, gender and history, will speak at Watkins College of Art, Design & Film on Monday, October 27. Her lecture, entitled “The Pseudo-Archive,” will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the Watkins Theater, and is free and open to the public.

In her first visit to Nashville, Pushpamala will present her recent work, talking about using different sources and materials, mixing up genres and archives, and questioning classifications. Christine Rogers, assistant professor of photography at Watkins, will introduce her and facilitate Q&A in the Watkins Theater.

They first met in 2013 in Bangalore, when Rogers was on a Fulbright-Nehru Fellowship completing research for her project, Photographing Imagined Landscapes: The Switzerland of India. “I was immediately interested in the theatricality of Pushpamala’s work as well as her mining of various photographic histories as a way of understanding the construction of the self and, perhaps more broadly, a construction of national identity,” said Rogers. “She is a charismatic presence on both sides of the lens, and Watkins is very pleased to welcome such an innovative and challenging artist.”

Pushpamala will be in the United States for the opening of Prospect New Orleans, the largest biennial of international contemporary art in the country (Oct. 25-Jan. 25, 2015), where she and collaborator Clare Arni will present work from their project Native Women of South India: Manners & Customs (2000-2004).

As subject of her own compositions, Pushpamala adopts various popular personas and ironic roles in theatrical compositions, leading her work to be described as performance photography. She has exhibited nationally and internationally, receiving acclaim for “The Ethnographic Series” (part of the Native Women of South India project), which explores photography as a tool of ethnographic documentation and humorously challenges the authenticity of the photographic image.

Other projects have mined the genres of cinema, popular culture, mythology and historical references, often using humor and wit as a method of exposing cultural and gender stereotyping while exploring the complex terrain of contemporary urban life in India.

Born in Bangalore and formally trained as a sculptor (BFA and MFA from the Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, India), Pushpamala eventually shifted to photography to explore her interest in narrative figuration. Since 1983, her work has been seen in nearly 100 exhibitions, with solo shows in Mumbai, New Delhi, New York, Milan, Paris, Salzburg and Gyor, Hungary.

WAG’s November show: “Desire Trap/pings”

Posted on: October 8th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
November 1, 2014 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Where:
WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery), Arcade Alley, Nashville, TN 37219, USA
"Loose Gate"

“Loose Gate”

Hybrid forms and processes locate desire between the cool, fetishized ironies of glam culture and sincere ritual; between consumer aesthetic and human touch; between cereal box and retablo (altarpiece).

David Anderson’s installation, Desire Trap/pings combines hyper color, invented graphic forms, and grungy, tactile, shimmering surfaces to suggest a space analogous to a near future church of Philip K. Dick’s (and David Anderson’s) imagination.

‘Split & Twisted’ annual juried Graphic Design show

Posted on: October 8th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
October 24, 2014 @ 9:00 am – November 14, 2014 @ 2:00 pm
Where:
Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents Split & Twisted, the school’s annual juried graphic design student exhibition, from October 23–November 14 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

All Watkins Graphic Design majors are eligible to submit projects (created since September 2013) in 10 categories: Advertising, Books & Jackets, Identity, Illustration, Illustration Series, Package Design, Poster/Design, Publication Design, Multimedia, and Miscellaneous/Design.

Department of Graphic Design chair Dan Brawner, recognized as a “top instructor” by the international visual communications journal Graphis, will announce the category winners as well as best in show and faculty choice awards.

Split&Twisted 2014 bannerWatkins Graphic Design students and alumni are consistently among the most honored in the country through their submissions to regional, national and international advertising design competitions, particularly in the student and professional categories of the ADDY Awards (hosted by the American Advertising Federation). At the 2014 Nashville Student ADDYs, Watkins won more top-level awards than any other school competing (just as they did in 2012 and 2013), claiming nine Golds, eight Silvers and three of four Judge’s Choice Award.

Watkins students continue to blanket Nashville and the region with their intelligence, visual wit and creativity through unique opportunities with several beloved Nashville community events. In the past few years, their talents have been chosen to promote signature happenings such as the American Artisan Festival, the Tin Pan South Songwriters Festival, Music City Hot Chicken Festival, Nashville Sister Cities Program, Nashville Symphony and Nashville Opera performances, and Murfreesboro’s JazzFest, as well as the Nashville Scene’s “Best of Nashville” cover art.

Opening reception for ‘Split & Twisted’

Posted on: October 8th, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
October 23, 2014 @ 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Where:
Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery

Split&Twisted 2014 bannerWatkins College of Art, Design & Film presents Split & Twisted, the school’s annual juried graphic design student exhibition, from October 23–November 14 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

Split & Twisted’s opening night reception, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, October 23, is free and the public is invited.

All Watkins Graphic Design majors are eligible to submit projects (created since September 2013) in 10 categories: Advertising, Books & Jackets, Identity, Illustration, Illustration Series, Package Design, Poster/Design, Publication Design, Multimedia, and Miscellaneous/Design.

Department of Graphic Design chair Dan Brawner, recognized as a “top instructor” by the international visual communications journal Graphis, will announce the category winners as well as best in show and faculty choice awards.

Watkins Graphic Design students and alumni are consistently among the most honored in the country through their submissions to regional, national and international advertising design competitions, particularly in the student and professional categories of the ADDY Awards (hosted by the American Advertising Federation). At the 2014 Nashville Student ADDYs, Watkins won more top-level awards than any other school competing (just as they did in 2012 and 2013), claiming nine Golds, eight Silvers and three of four Judge’s Choice Award.

Watkins students continue to blanket Nashville and the region with their intelligence, visual wit and creativity through unique opportunities with several beloved Nashville community events. In the past few years, their talents have been chosen to promote signature happenings such as the American Artisan Festival, the Tin Pan South Songwriters Festival, Music City Hot Chicken Festival, Nashville Sister Cities Program, Nashville Symphony and Nashville Opera performances, and Murfreesboro’s JazzFest, as well as the Nashville Scene’s “Best of Nashville” cover art.

Currey Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.

Graphic Design Senior Portfolio & Exhibition: “Bottoms Up”

Posted on: October 1st, 2014 by Caroline Davis No Comments
When:
December 4, 2014 @ 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Where:
Deavor, 305 Jefferson Street #125, Nashville, TN 37208, USA

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents the Senior Graphic Design Exhibition “Bottoms Up,” featuring work by Bachelor of Arts in Graphic Design degree candidates Ryan Arauza, Zie Campbell, Ross Denton, Matthew Erwin and Jessica Yohn, on Thursday, December 4, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Deavor in East Nashville.

The one-night-only portfolio showcase, which is free and open to the public, will introduce to the community “five local designers brewed to perfection.” On display will be print and multimedia projects in advertising, packaging, web design, branding, digital publishing and illustration.

Each graduating class of graphic designers at Watkins chooses a presentation theme for their group BFA show, and this year’s “Bottoms Up” concept was inspired by a conversation about the growing number of micro breweries in town Prompted by Ross Denton, they each described what kind of brew they would be.

For more information, visit show website BotttomsUpDesign.com or www.Watkins.edu.