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Calendar

Jul
12
Sat
HerStory Institute screening: “Reflections Unheard: Black Women in Civil Rights” (2 showings) @ Watkins Theater
Jul 12 @ 3:00 pm – 8:30 pm

In partnership with Watkins Community Education, the HerStory Institute presents a summer cinema series of films highlighting the writing, producing, directing, cinematography, production design and editing in films created by women. The series will screen a range of features, shorts and documentary films including but not limited to independent and foreign films, classics and festival favorites. In addition, the HerStory Institute will deliver monthly panels and/or workshops for film aficionados who desire a deeper understanding of the art and craft of film. HerStory Institute is supported by Her Point of View, an international arts and entertainment festival supporting the creative work of women.

NOTE: Two screenings at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Where do black women activists fit into the epochal struggles for equality and liberation during the 1960s and 70s? The feature-length documentary “Reflections Unheard: Black Women in Civil Rights” unearths the story of black women’s political marginalization—between the male-dominated Black Power movement and second wave feminism, which was largely white and middle class—showing how each failed to recognize black women’s overlapping racial and gender identities. Archival footage and in-depth interviews with former members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), SNCC’s Black Women’s Liberation Committee, the Black Panther Party, Third World Women’s Alliance, and the National Black Women’s Feminist Organization reveal how black women mobilized, fought for recognition, and raised awareness of how sexism and class issues affected women of color within and outside The Black Power Movement and mainstream feminism. Prominently featured activists include Frances Beale, Angela Davis, Kola Boof, Nikki Giovanni, Rosemari Mealy, Judy Richardson, Gwendolyn Simmons, Deborah Singletary, and Eugenia Wiltshire. Required viewing for Women’s Studies, African American Studies, and students of the Civil Rights Movement.

81 min. 2013.

HerStory Institute screening: “Patsy Mink: Ahead of the Majority” @ Watkins Theater
Jul 12 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

In partnership with Watkins Community Education, the HerStory Institute presents a summer cinema series of films highlighting the writing, producing, directing, cinematography, production design and editing in films created by women. The series will screen a range of features, shorts and documentary films including but not limited to independent and foreign films, classics and festival favorites. In addition, the HerStory Institute will deliver monthly panels and/or workshops for film aficionados who desire a deeper understanding of the art and craft of film. HerStory Institute is supported by Her Point of View, an international arts and entertainment festival supporting the creative work of women.

In 1965, Patsy Takemoto Mink became the first woman of color in the United States Congress. Seven years later, she ran for the U.S. presidency and was the driving force behind Title IX, the landmark legislation that transformed women’s opportunities in higher education and athletics.  Mink was an Asian American woman who fought racism and sexism while redefining U.S. politics. Her tumultuous, often lonely political journey reveals what can be at stake for female politicians that defy expectations, push limits and adhere to their principles. Mink encountered sexism within her own party, whose leaders disliked her independent style and openly maneuvered against her. And her liberal views, particularly her vocal opposition to the Vietnam War, engendered intense criticism.  A compelling portrait of an iconoclastic figure that remains seldom spotlighted in history books, “Patsy Mink: Ahead of the Majority” illuminates how Mink’s daring to remain “ahead of the majority” in her beliefs enabled groundbreaking changes for the rights of the disenfranchised. A woman of the people as well as a pioneer, a patriot and an outcast, Patsy Mink’s intriguing story embodies the history, ideals and spirit of America.

56 min. 2008.

Co. H’s ‘Mystic Truths’ reception @ Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery
Jul 12 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Co. H's 'Mystic Truths' reception @ Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery

Mystic Truths, a multi-media exhibition from Watkins College of Art, Design & Film’s student-led collective Co. H, will celebrate its summer run with a reception on Saturday, July 12, from 6 to 9 p.m. Featuring outstanding work in painting, printmaking, sculpture, drawing, photography, video and installation from 15 area artists, the show remains on view through July 18 in the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr. Gallery on campus.

The reception and exhibition are free and open to the public.

Participants in Mystic Truths: A Group Show From Co. H and Friends,are:

  • Caleb Adcock, Fine Art, senior (digital prints)
  • Mika Agari, Fine Art, senior (video)
  • David Anderson, Fine Art, junior (painting)
  • Heather Barrie, Fine Art, senior (printmaking)
  • Kevin Dietz, Fine Art, sophomore (printmaking)
  • Elisha Farahmand, Fine Art, junior (video)
  • Michael Hampton, Fine Art ‘14 (video)
  • Aaron Harper, Fine Art, senior (drawing)
  • Blake Holland, Film, senior (photography)
  • Casey Payne, Fine Art, junior (painting)
  • Zack Rafuls, Fine Art, senior (sculpture)
  • Alexine Rioux, Fine Art, ’14 (printmaking)
  • Kayla Saito, Fine Art, senior (sculpture)
  • Luke Weir, Fine Art, junior (conceptual/installation)
  • Weng Tze Yang, photography, senior (photographic installation)

Mystic Truths collects work from Co. H council members, collaborators and studio mates in order to present a survey of some of the best work from Watkins students. Featuring current students and recent graduates, Mystic Truths showcases work across all disciplines, including drawing, painting, sculpture, video, photography, installation and printmaking. The title of the show is pulled from the Bruce Nauman neon sign piece “The True Artist Helps The World By Revealing Mystic Truths” (1967), referencing the function of the artist in ironic and hopeful lights simultaneously while also directly supplanting the work within a contemporary context and dialogue.

Currey Gallery’s summer hours are Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m.  For more information, visit www.watkins.edu.

Watkins is located at 2298 Rosa L. Parks Boulevard in MetroCenter. Free parking is available in the campus lot.

About Co. H
A collective of artists from various disciplines of the visual arts, Co. H provides opportunities for both students and professionals pursuing and/or working in the arts. Founded at Watkins in 2011, Co. H activity includes hosting lecture by artists and art professionals, holding studio critiques and collaborating on multi-disciplinary performances within the community. Visit http://companyh.tumblr.com.

About Bruce Nauman

From PBS.org/art21: Born in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Bruce Nauman has been recognized since the early 1970s as one of the most innovative and provocative of America’s contemporary artists. Nauman finds inspiration in the activities, speech, and materials of everyday life. He graduated with a BFA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1964, and with an MFA from the University of California, Davis, in 1966. Confronted with the question “What to do?” in his studio soon after leaving school, Nauman had the simple but profound realization that “If I was an artist and I was in the studio, then whatever I was doing in the studio must be art. At this point art became more of an activity and less of a product.” Working in the diverse mediums of sculpture, video, film, printmaking, performance, and installation, Nauman concentrates less on the development of a characteristic style and more on the way in which a process or activity can transform or become a work of art. A survey of his diverse output demonstrates the alternately political, prosaic, spiritual, and crass methods by which Nauman examines life in all its gory details, mapping the human arc between life and death. The text from an early neon work proclaims: “The true artist helps the world by revealing mystic truths.” Whether or not we—or even Nauman—agree with this statement, the underlying subtext of the piece emphasizes the way in which the audience, artist, and culture at large are involved in the resonance a work of art will ultimately have. Nauman lives in New Mexico.

Jul
19
Sat
HerStory Institue screening: “Homebound” (2 showings) @ Watkins Theater
Jul 19 @ 5:00 pm – 8:30 pm

In partnership with Watkins Community Education, the HerStory Institute presents a summer cinema series of films highlighting the writing, producing, directing, cinematography, production design and editing in films created by women. The series will screen a range of features, shorts and documentary films including but not limited to independent and foreign films, classics and festival favorites. In addition, the HerStory Institute will deliver monthly panels and/or workshops for film aficionados who desire a deeper understanding of the art and craft of film. HerStory Institute is supported by Her Point of View, an international arts and entertainment festival supporting the creative work of women.

NOTE: Two screenings, at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.

“Homebound” is the story of Richard Lynn, a successful young man who returns to his small hometown, El Campo, Texas. He has to help his father Gilberto, who’s ill with cancer, run the family business, a dilapidated bar. Richard Lynn accidentally falls in love for the first time with Sofia, a Venezuelan immigrant who speaks very little English. As Richard befriends Sofia’s son, and is reminded of the friendships and culture of his hometown, he learns more about his father’s illness, the truth about his mother’s passing and their plans for him when he inherits it all. His secret desire to burn down the bar, which he blames for his mother’s death, surfaces as he questions everything, his past, his future, and his understanding of family.  The film is heartwarming, with inspiring performances, unexpected twists and a passionate ending that will delight audiences around the world.

2013

Jul
26
Sat
HerStory Institute screening: “Redemption Trail” (2 showings) @ Watkins Theater
Jul 26 @ 5:00 pm – 9:00 pm

In partnership with Watkins Community Education, the HerStory Institute presents a summer cinema series of films highlighting the writing, producing, directing, cinematography, production design and editing in films created by women. The series will screen a range of features, shorts and documentary films including but not limited to independent and foreign films, classics and festival favorites. In addition, the HerStory Institute will deliver monthly panels and/or workshops for film aficionados who desire a deeper understanding of the art and craft of film. HerStory Institute is supported by Her Point of View, an international arts and entertainment festival supporting the creative work of women.

NOTE: Two screenings, at 5 p.m and 7 p.m.

“Redemption Trail” is a contemporary Western about two powerful, yet deeply troubled women –  refugees from political and personal trauma — who have both chosen to flee a past that haunts them.  The daughter of a murdered Black Panther revolutionary, Tess (LisaGay Hamilton) lives off the grid on a Sonoma vineyard, fiercely detached from all connections. Her hermetic life cracks when she gives reluctant shelter to a desperate young woman, Anna (Lily Rabe), who has attempted suicide in a nearby woodland.  An unlikely alliance forms between the two, where other close relationships have failed — David, Anna’s  husband (Hamish Linklater), and John, Tess’ employer (Jake Weber), cannot break through their walls. But the very difference between the two women opens them up to a new vision of themselves, as not only survivors, but as heroes capable even of a thrilling shoot-out in the name of outlaw justice. Reclaiming freedom, and life, they plunge forward towards an unknown, transformative horizon. 

2013

Jul
31
Thu
Summer classes end
Jul 31 all-day
Aug
2
Sat
Housing closes
Aug 2 all-day
HerStory Institute screening: “The Milky Way” (2 showings) @ Watkins Theater
Aug 2 @ 5:00 pm – 8:45 pm

In partnership with Watkins Community Education, the HerStory Institute presents a summer cinema series of films highlighting the writing, producing, directing, cinematography, production design and editing in films created by women. The series will screen a range of features, shorts and documentary films including but not limited to independent and foreign films, classics and festival favorites. In addition, the HerStory Institute will deliver monthly panels and/or workshops for film aficionados who desire a deeper understanding of the art and craft of film. HerStory Institute is supported by Her Point of View, an international arts and entertainment festival supporting the creative work of women.

NOTE: Two screenings, at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.

The breastfeeding documentary that will change the face of American motherhood: “The Milky Way” is a documentary exposé about breastfeeding in the United States.  We show how women can reclaim their birthright and restore the nursing mother archetype. More than a breastfeeding promotion film, this is a film by, for, and about women. It is about the knowledge that inherently resides in every woman, how to access that knowledge and how to trust what we already know. It is a film that inspires women to say, “I can do that!” “I want to do that!”  Mission: Restore the phenomenon of the breastfeeding mother.  Core Values: Mother and baby are a symbiotic, synergistic, holistic entity; Profound trust in women’s bodies and babies capabilities; Mother is the baby’s home, habitat; Nursing is a normal, ordinary yet extraordinary, experience.  Goals:  Empower mothers through a film designed to elicit each mother’s own embodied wisdom; Validate women’s lived experience of mothering, birthing and breastfeeding; Inspire each woman to trust her body, trust her baby, and trust herself during her journey through motherhood; Reveal a newborn’s innate abilities; Unveil the extraordinary inner workings of nursing; Transform the way America views baby’s first food; Dismantle beliefs and practices that compromise a woman’s ability to nurse a baby; Expose the many ways culture undermines nursing.

93 min. 2014

WAG’s August show: “A Field Guide to Getting Lost” from Jenna Maurice & John Whitten @ WAG (Watkins Arcade Gallery)
Aug 2 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Watkins College of Art, Design & Film presents A Field Guide to Getting Lostfeaturing video work by alumni Jenna Maurice and John Whitten, at its downtown gallery WAG during the August 2 edition of the First Saturday Art Crawl.

Jenna Maurice Lowest Point

“Lowest Point”

Taken from the title of the 2006 book by Rebecca Solnit, A Field Guide to Getting Lost is a video-based exhibition about Maurice and Whitten’s relationships with nature, the unknown, and their search for the unfamiliar. These artists champion being lost. It is a goal for which they strive. Their research happens deep in secluded areas where isolation and solitude are desirable characteristics. Having relocated from Nashville to geographic regions offering some of the United States’ most diverse landscapes (Maurice to Colorado and Whitten to Oregon), their work deals with the subtleties of communication amid isolation, and their interpretation of the natural world. Fueled by a desire to discover a deeper level of connectedness to their environment, the two artists employ a range of tactics from subtle, poetic gestures of mimicry to spectacular displays of signals designed to attract help. In this work, both artists question their sense of place in the natural world, what it means to make one’s way through life, and what it means to be a lost soul.

WAG–an acronym for Watkins Arcade Gallery–is located in suite 77 upstairs in the historic Arcade and is open the first Saturday evening of the month during each Art Crawl (from 6-9 p.m.), and by appointment.

Art Crawl logoWAG joins approximately 20 participating Art Crawl galleries along Fifth Avenue of the Arts and upstairs in the Historic Arcade. Admission is free, and the Nashville Downtown Partnership provides two free shuttles traveling among the venues. For more information on the First Saturday Art Crawl, visit nashvilledowntown.com/play/first-saturday-art-crawl.

Aug
9
Sat
HerStory Institute screening: “It Felt Like Love” (2 showings)
Aug 9 @ 5:00 pm – 8:30 pm

In partnership with Watkins Community Education, the HerStory Institute presents a summer cinema series of films highlighting the writing, producing, directing, cinematography, production design and editing in films created by women. The series will screen a range of features, shorts and documentary films including but not limited to independent and foreign films, classics and festival favorites. In addition, the HerStory Institute will deliver monthly panels and/or workshops for film aficionados who desire a deeper understanding of the art and craft of film. HerStory Institute is supported by Her Point of View, an international arts and entertainment festival supporting the creative work of women.

NOTE: Two screenings, at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Eliza Hittman’s powerful debut feature “It Felt Like Love” tells the story of Lila (Gina Piersanti, in a stunning debut), a 14-year-old spending a hot summer in a blue-collar Brooklyn neighborhood far removed from the bustling city. Awkward, lonely, and often playing the third wheel, Lila is determined to emulate the sexual exploits of her more experienced best friend. She fixates on Sammy, a tough older guy, when she hears that “he’ll sleep with anyone.” Deluded in her romantic pursuit, Lila tries desperately to insert herself into Sammy’s gritty world, but in doing so she puts herself into a dangerously vulnerable situation.

82 min. 2013